Trends in groundwater quality, 2005–2014

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2306
21
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Groundwater quality indicators include E.coli, nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Also included is data on pesticides, iron, manganese, electrical conductivity, and total dissolved solids. Information on sampling protocol, equipment, and method is provided.

Nitrogen occurs naturally in groundwater, but usually at very low concentrations. Agricultural and urban land use can add more nitrate-nitrogen to groundwater. If used for drinking water, high levels of nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes. Ammoniacal nitrogen is undesirable if groundwater is used for drinking, and elevated levels of nitrate and ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other animals. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. It can also be present naturally from interactions between groundwater and rocks. Too much phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E.coli in fresh water can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

This dataset relates to trends in four groundwater quality indicators: nitrate nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, and E.coli. throughout New Zealand over the 10-year period 2005–2014.

Table ID 53604
Data type Table
Row count 1683
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Predicted E.coli concentrations in rivers, 1990–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2204
22
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

River water quality is valued for many reasons including recreational value.
Escherichia coli (E.coli) can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces, which can cause illness.

File contains the model outputs for E.coli concentrations as four different statistics for each river segment in New Zealand’s digital river network.

Table ID 53603
Data type Table
Row count 570577
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality, 1964–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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808
49
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Groundwater quality indicators include E.coli, nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Also included is data on pesticides, iron, manganese, electrical conductivity, and total dissolved solids. Information on sampling protocol, equipment, and method is provided.

Nitrogen occurs naturally in groundwater, but usually at very low concentrations. Agricultural and urban land use can add more nitrate-nitrogen to groundwater. If used for drinking water, high levels of nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes. Ammoniacal nitrogen is undesirable if groundwater is used for drinking, and elevated levels of nitrate and ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other animals. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. It can also be present naturally from interactions between groundwater and rocks. Too much phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E.coli in fresh water can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

The file contains the raw data for all groundwater quality indicators. This dataset was used to calculate the percent exceedances of the drinking water standards for E.coli and nitrate-nitrogen over the period 2012–14.

Table ID 53602
Data type Table
Row count 111035
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Predicted river water quality, 2009–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2631
120
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

River water quality is valued for many reasons including ecological function and habitat, recreational value, its role in supporting people and industry, and its cultural significance. Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus are essential for plant growth, however too much in rivers can lead to excessive growth of river algae, which can degrade habitat.

High concentrations of nitrogen in the form of ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other aquatic animals, and nitrate-nitrogen can be toxic to humans. Water clarity is a measure of underwater visibility, and affects habitat of aquatic life such as fish and birds, and can also impact on aesthetic values and recreational use of rivers and streams. Escherichia coli (E.coli) can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces, which can cause illness.

File contains the model outputs for river water quality indicators as medians for each river segment in New Zealand’s digital river network.

Table ID 53601
Data type Table
Row count 593444
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Urban water quality - all data - 1985–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2305
38
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Urban water quality indicators include heavy metals, nutrients, and E.coli. The concentrations of these indicators are compared to the proportion of urban land cover in catchments.

Heavy metals have the ability to accumulate in sediments, shellfish, and other aquatic organisms. Metals can reach toxic levels in organisms making them unsafe to consume and can be toxic to aquatic life. Nutrients can cause excessive algal growth and E.coli has the ability to make people sick while they are swimming if concentrations are high enough. Rivers with poor water quality are rarely suitable for recreation and provide poor habitats for aquatic species.

File contains data related to each sampling occasion by site for each water quality indicator in Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch over the period 1985–15.

Table ID 53600
Data type Table
Row count 58661
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Freshwater fish observational data, 1977-2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3501
72
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Freshwater fish are an important component of freshwater ecosystems, have intrinsic biodiversity values and are a valued resource for Māori, recreational and commercial fishers. The presence or absence of a fish species can be affected by changes in catchment land cover and land use, in-stream habitat, fish passages (routes for moving up and down waterways), pests, and contaminants.

The file contains the information associated with each record in the New Zealand Freshwater Fish Database used in the report, and the associated River Environment Classification information of the location of the observation.

Table ID 53599
Data type Table
Row count 26915
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Urban stream water quality - trends - 2008–15

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2225
22
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Urban water quality indicators include heavy metals, nutrients, and E.coli. The concentrations of these indicators are compared to the proportion of urban land cover in catchments.

Zinc and copper are heavy metals that can accumulate in sediments, shellfish, and other aquatic organisms. Metals can reach toxic levels in organisms making them unsafe to eat and can be toxic to aquatic life. Nitrogen and phosphorus are nutrients that can cause excessive algal growth. Ammonical nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen can be toxic to aquatic life if concentrations in streams are high enough. E.coli is an indicator of disease-causing organisms, which may affect human health and recreational values in streams.

File contains trend analyses by site for water quality indicators in Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch over the period 2008–15.

Table ID 53598
Data type Table
Row count 217
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Urban water quality - state - 2013–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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279
21
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Urban water quality indicators include heavy metals, nutrients, and E.coli. The concentrations of these indicators are compared to the proportion of urban land cover in catchments.

Heavy metals have the ability to accumulate in sediments, shellfish, and other aquatic organisms. Metals can reach toxic levels in organisms making them unsafe to consume and can be toxic to aquatic life. Nutrients can cause excessive algal growth and E.coli has the ability to make people sick while they are swimming if concentrations are high enough. Rivers with poor water quality are rarely suitable for recreation and provide poor habitats for aquatic species.

File contains data analysis of medians and percentiles by site for water quality indicators, and includes the proportion of urban land cover in catchments in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch over the period 2013–2015.

Table ID 53597
Data type Table
Row count 379
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated annual seabird captures in trawl and longline fisheries by fishery type (2003–14)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2227
12
Added
25 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Oct 2016.

Along with sea lions, fur seals, and dolphins, seabirds are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters (exclusive economic zone and territorial sea). Estimating seabird deaths from bycatch in commercial fishing is one way of assessing the pressure some seabird species face from current fishing practices. About one-third of our 92 resident seabird species and subspecies are considered to be threatened with extinction. We report on the risk of death from commercial fishing for 70 seabird species and subspecies.
This data has been significantly revised since that reported in Environment Aotearoa 2015, with the estimated total bycatch of seabirds increasing by nearly 1400 birds (30 %) on average across the comparable years 2002/3 – 2012/13. This revision is due to an updated and more unified modelling approach being applied by the data providers. For further information about this revision please see our Marine domain 2016 webpage or Abraham and Richard (unpublished).

Table ID 53511
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Area of coastal seabed trawled by depth class (2008–12)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2119
7
Added
25 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging, when fishing nets or dredges are towed near and along the seabed, can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed, shading (in shallow waters) or smothering marine species. This measure focuses on coastal areas (waters shallower than 250m). Focusing on coastal benthic habitats is important as these face multiple threats (for example from land-based activities) in addition to fishing.

Table ID 53510
Data type Table
Row count 3
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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