Black carbon concentrations, 2002–17

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1405
9
Added
15 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2018.

Black carbon is a particle, often in the PM2.5 or ultra-fine size range, which is emitted from combustion sources and is commonly known as soot. In New Zealand most black carbon is emitted from vehicles (especially diesel vehicles), burning wood and coal for home heating, and outdoor burning. Both long and short-term exposure to black carbon is linked to serious health effects, such as respiratory and cardiovascular disease, cancer, and premature death (World Health Organization (WHO), 2013).
Black carbon warms the climate globally and regionally because it is efficient at absorbing energy from sunlight. Black carbon also increases ice and snow melt when deposited on these surfaces, darkening them and lowering albedo (proportion of light that is reflected) so they absorb more solar energy (Ramanathan & Carmichael, 2008).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98417
Data type Table
Row count 19077
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Heavy metal concentrations, 2002–17

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1400
11
Added
15 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2018.

Inhaling particulate matter (PM) containing heavy metals can cause serious health effects (World Health Organization (WHO), 2013). Airborne arsenic is linked to lung cancers (WHO, 2013), and heart, liver, kidney, and nerve damage (Caussy, 2003). Nickel and vanadium are linked to lung and nasal sinus cancers. Lead can impair cognitive function in children and affect an adult’s cardiovascular system, even at low blood levels (WHO, 2013).
Heavy metals are also toxic to other organisms, and can bioaccumulate in animals, especially in aquatic ecosystems (Rahman, Hasegawa, & Lim, 2012). We don’t know how much airborne heavy metal is deposited in New Zealand.
We report on the concentrations of arsenic, lead, and vanadium in PM10 (PM 10 micrometres or less in diameter) from 2007-16 at Henderson – Auckland which were measured using a method directly comparable to relevant guidelines. We also report on arsenic, nickel, lead, and vanadium concentrations at 5 Auckland sites from 2005–16 that were measured using a method which cannot be directly compared to relevant guidelines but provides information on concentrations.
Arsenic is emitted when burning wood treated with copper chromium arsenic preservative (eg building project offcuts). A 2012 Auckland study showed that 17 percent of households may burn such wood (Stones-Havas, 2014).
Lead is emitted from burning wood coated with lead-based paint, by removing lead-based paint from buildings without proper safety precautions, and from industrial discharges (eg at metal smelters). In New Zealand, airborne nickel and vanadium concentrations are highest near ports and are associated with combustion exhaust from ships (Davy & Trompetter, 2018). Monitoring for lead has been limited since the fall in ambient lead concentrations after New Zealand’s petrol became lead free in 1996.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98416
Data type Table
Row count 19077
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Carbon monoxide concentrations, 1996–17

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1427
20
Added
15 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2018.

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas formed by the incomplete combustion of fuels, particularly from motor vehicles, from burning wood and coal, and using unflued gas heaters for home heating. It also occurs naturally; for example, from wild fires.
Carbon monoxide can affect human health by interfering with the blood’s ability to carry oxygen and by aggravating heart conditions. It has a relatively long life in the atmosphere – about three months. This is due to the slow rate at which carbon monoxide oxidises, forming carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). Carbon monoxide also has an important role in forming smog.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98415
Data type Table
Row count 2922098
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Total suspended particulate matter concentrations at Penrose, Auckland, 1965–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1341
2
Added
16 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2018.

Total suspended particulate matter (TSP) consists of solid and liquid airborne particles that are smaller than 100 micrometres in diameter. Although, by weight, it is dominated by the larger particles it does also include the PM10 and PM2.5 sub-fractions that are responsible for most health effects, such as respiratory and cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. TSP can be emitted from earthworks, construction and roadworks, and the combustion of fuels such as wood and coal (eg, from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles).
Natural TSP sources include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash.
TSP consists of airborne particles up to 100 micrometres (μm) in diameter (PM100). TSP is small enough to be inhaled; however, larger particles (10–100μm) are filtered out in the nasal cavity and are often relatively harmless.
TSP can be emitted from earthworks, construction, and roadworks, and from combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg, home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of TSP include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. TSP also forms from reactions in the atmosphere between gases or between gases and other particles.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98422
Data type Table
Row count 2658
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Benzene concentrations in Hamilton, 2003–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1325
2
Added
15 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2018.

Benzene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is common in the air. Motor vehicles are benzene’s primary emission source (Guerreiro, Foltescu, & de Leeuw, 2014; Weisel, 2010) although burning wood or coal for home heating, volcanoes, and forest fires also emit benzene.
Benzene is a human carcinogen (World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe Copenhagen, 2000) that has been shown to cause leukaemia (Smith, 2010), and is associated with developmental, immune, neurological, reproductive, and respiratory problems (Bahadar, Mostafalou, & Abdollahi, 2014). Acute exposure can affect the liver and respiration (Bahadar et al, 2014).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98412
Data type Table
Row count 71
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater pesticides survey, 2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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862
13
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Pesticides, which include insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and plant growth regulators, are commonly used in New Zealand to control insects, diseases and weeds in primary industries such as agricultural farming, forestry and horticulture. Once applied to land or crops, pesticides can make their way through soil and enter groundwater systems.

File contains whether a pesticide was detected at monitored wells, and if so, what the concentration is. File also includes surrounding land use, well use, well diameter, well depth, and screen depth, where available.

Table ID 53605
Data type Table
Row count 153
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Land cover change, 1996–2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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786
19
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Land cover describes the extent of vegetation, water bodies, built environments, and bare natural surfaces (eg gravel and rock) across New Zealand. Measuring the composition of and changes in land cover can help us understand the pressures that different land uses are placing on the biodiversity and functioning of ecosystems.

This measure reports on land cover by class, regional council area, and change over time in hectares and percentage.

For more information on the Landcover Database please refer to: lris.scinfo.org.nz/layer/48423-lcdb-v41-land-cover...

Table ID 95350
Data type Table
Row count 4145
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality, 1964–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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759
48
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Groundwater quality indicators include E.coli, nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Also included is data on pesticides, iron, manganese, electrical conductivity, and total dissolved solids. Information on sampling protocol, equipment, and method is provided.

Nitrogen occurs naturally in groundwater, but usually at very low concentrations. Agricultural and urban land use can add more nitrate-nitrogen to groundwater. If used for drinking water, high levels of nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes. Ammoniacal nitrogen is undesirable if groundwater is used for drinking, and elevated levels of nitrate and ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other animals. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. It can also be present naturally from interactions between groundwater and rocks. Too much phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E.coli in fresh water can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

The file contains the raw data for all groundwater quality indicators. This dataset was used to calculate the percent exceedances of the drinking water standards for E.coli and nitrate-nitrogen over the period 2012–14.

Table ID 53602
Data type Table
Row count 111035
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Accumulated freshwater takes, 2013–14

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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760
46
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Flow is the volume of water passing a point over a certain time, and provides information about the availability of water for people and the environment. Overall, this affects how much water is available for irrigation, drinking water, hydroelectricity generation, and recreational activities. River flows also influence a waterway’s physical form, habitat, and ecological processes like migration, spawning, and food supply for aquatic life.

The file provides the estimated impact of upstream consents on the modelled median flow of a particular reach in the digital river network. This is calculated by upstream total consented takes by median flow.

Table ID 53614
Data type Table
Row count 692989
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Commercial catch for sharks and rays

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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777
27
Added
24 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Oct 2016.

New Zealand waters have at least 117 species of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, and other cartilaginous fish species). They are particularly vulnerable to overfishing because they are long-lived, mature slowly, and have a low reproductive rate. Chondrichthyans are important for healthy ocean ecosystems, and reporting their commercial catch and bycatch helps us understand the sustainability of our fisheries.

Table ID 53508
Data type Table
Row count 453
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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