Mean fish index of biotic integrity (IBI) scores for all river sites, by decade, 1970-2007

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4259
32
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Freshwater fish are an important component of freshwater ecosystems and a valued resource for Māori and recreational fishers. The community of fish species found at a site can be affected by changes in catchment land cover and land use, in-stream habitat, fish passages (routes for moving up and down waterways), pests, and contaminants. The fish index of biotic integrity (IBI) is a measure of the condition of fish communities at sites across the country.

This dataset relates to the "Freshwater fish communities" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52545
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Vehicle Kilometres Travelled

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4278
15
Added
01 Dec 2014

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Dec 2014.

Source: Ministry of Transport

Table ID 52128
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in peak UV index value, 1981–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4290
5
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Trends in daily peak UV index values at Invercargill, Lauder (Otago region), Christchurch, Paraparaumu (Wellington region), and Leigh (Auckland region). The strength of UV light is expressed as a solar UV index, starting from 0 (no UV) to 11+ (extreme).
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light helps our bodies make vitamin D, which we need for healthy bones and muscles. However, too much exposure to UV light can cause skin cancer. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, and monitoring UV levels helps us understand the occurrence of skin cancer.
Ozone in the upper atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s UV light, protecting us from harmful levels. The amount of UV radiation reaching the ground varies in relation to changes in the atmospheric ozone concentrations. The Antarctic ozone hole lies well to the south of New Zealand and does not have a large effect on New Zealand’s ozone concentrations.
The trend was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89469
Data type Table
Row count 5
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Growing degree days monthly data by site, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4250
34
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Growing degree days (GDD) measures the amount of warmth available for plant and insect growth and can be used to predict when flowers will bloom and crops and insects will mature. GDD counts the total number of degrees Celsius each day is above a threshold temperature. In this report we used 10 degrees Celsius. Increased GDD means that plants and insects reach maturity faster, provided that other conditions necessary for growth are favourable, such as sufficient moisture and nutrients. As a measure of temperature, GDD experiences short-term changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño, and in the longer-term is affected by our warming climate.
This dataset gives the number of GDD per month and calendar year for all 30 sites.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89392
Data type Table
Row count 1290
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

On-road Transport Emissions by Pollutant

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4243
39
Added
01 Dec 2014

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Dec 2014.

Source: National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research

Table ID 52127
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in groundwater quality, 2005–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4255
26
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Groundwater quality indicators include E.coli, nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Also included is data on pesticides, iron, manganese, electrical conductivity, and total dissolved solids. Information on sampling protocol, equipment, and method is provided.

Nitrogen occurs naturally in groundwater, but usually at very low concentrations. Agricultural and urban land use can add more nitrate-nitrogen to groundwater. If used for drinking water, high levels of nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes. Ammoniacal nitrogen is undesirable if groundwater is used for drinking, and elevated levels of nitrate and ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other animals. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. It can also be present naturally from interactions between groundwater and rocks. Too much phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E.coli in fresh water can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

This dataset relates to trends in four groundwater quality indicators: nitrate nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, and E.coli. throughout New Zealand over the 10-year period 2005–2014.

Table ID 53604
Data type Table
Row count 1683
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrogen dioxide concentrations and exceedances

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4225
40
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gas. It can be emitted directly into the air but is most often formed when nitric oxide (NO) emissions react with other chemicals in the air. Nationally, road motor vehicles are the main human-made source of nitrogen oxides (NOx, the collective term for NO2 and NO). NO2 may cause respiratory infections and reduced lung development and functioning.

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitric oxide (NO) (collectively known as nitrogen oxides, NOx) are emitted from the combustion of fossil fuels and from natural sources such as volcanoes. The four main human-made sources of key pollutants in New Zealand are burning wood or coal for home heating, road motor vehicle use, industry, and household outdoor burning.

Column units:
- Disp_graph column: 1= displayed on graph; 0 = not displayed on graph
- Variable column: mg_m3 = micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Regional council and unitary authority monitoring of nitrogen dioxide" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52457
Data type Table
Row count 594
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Autumn rainfall trends, 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4253
12
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Autumn rainfall trends for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89402
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual Average PM10 Concentration - Cities

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4196
45
Updated
01 Dec 2014

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 01 Dec 2014.

Greater than 100,000 people.

Average is population weighted average of monitoring sites in cities.

Note: PM10 concentrations are given in micrograms per cubic metre of air, or µg/m3.

Source: Regional councils of Waikato, Wellington, Canterbury, Otago; Auckland Council

Table ID 52133
Data type Table
Row count 24
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of extreme weather events identified by ICNZ (1975–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4190
49
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Extreme weather events are weather events that are rare or even statistically unlikely. In New Zealand, such events can be dangerous and costly, both socially and monetarily. They can cause damage that affects productivity and leads to millions of dollars in insurance claims.
This dataset relates to the "Insurance losses for extreme weather events" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52586
Data type Table
Row count 129
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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