Asset value of water resources used for hydroelectric generation, 2007–15

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4491
7
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Water is an important source of energy that contributes to New Zealand’s energy supply and the economy. As the main source of renewable energy in New Zealand, the use of water supports the production of the electricity industry. Tracking the value of this water as a natural resource – along with land form, slope, and elevation, which all help to generate hydroelectricity – shows the economic benefits derived from water use for current and future generations. Changes in flow regimes and climate can affect these values.

We report on the value of water resources used to generate hydroelectricity. This value includes both the returns received from current use (resource rent), and expected benefits from future use (the asset value).

Table ID 53615
Data type Table
Row count 54
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily peak UV index values, Invercargill, Leigh, Lauder, Paraparaumu and Christchurch (1981–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4456
22
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause skin cancer. Ozone absorbs some UV radiation, and UV levels can vary in relation to changes in atmospheric ozone. Monitoring UV levels can help us understand current skin cancer risk.
The Lauder spectroradiometer (UVM dataset) data are used to assure the reliability of broad-band erythermal UV (RB dataset) from five sites. Measurements supplied are daily peak, noon-time mean, and total daily dose of erythemal (skin-reddening) UV.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "UV intensity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52584
Data type Table
Row count 60760
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Urban water quality - all data - 1985–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4433
52
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Urban water quality indicators include heavy metals, nutrients, and E.coli. The concentrations of these indicators are compared to the proportion of urban land cover in catchments.

Heavy metals have the ability to accumulate in sediments, shellfish, and other aquatic organisms. Metals can reach toxic levels in organisms making them unsafe to consume and can be toxic to aquatic life. Nutrients can cause excessive algal growth and E.coli has the ability to make people sick while they are swimming if concentrations are high enough. Rivers with poor water quality are rarely suitable for recreation and provide poor habitats for aquatic species.

File contains data related to each sampling occasion by site for each water quality indicator in Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch over the period 1985–15.

Table ID 53600
Data type Table
Row count 58661
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lake water quality state percentiles, by monitoring site, 2009-2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4383
59
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

When nutrients accumulate in lakes (referred to as ‘nutrient enrichment’) above certain levels, they can make the lakes murky and green with algae, and lower oxygen levels. Lakes with extremely poor water quality are rarely suitable for recreation and provide poor habitats for aquatic species.

Percentile calculations for the following parameters are provided:
Trophic Level Index 3 (TLI)
Chlorophyll-a (CHLA)
Bottom-water dissolved oxygen (DObottom)
Ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4N)
Oxidised nitrogen (NO3N)
Total nitrogen (unfiltered) (TN)
Dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP)
Total phosphorus (unfiltered) (TP)

For more information please see:
Larned, S, Snelder, T, Unwin, M, McBride, G, Verburg, P, McMillan, H (2015).Analysis of Water Quality in New Zealand lakes and Rivers: data sources, data sets, assumptions, limitations, methods and results. NIWA Client Report no. CHC2015-033. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/DDui3u from the Ministry for the Environment dataservice.

This dataset relates to the "Lake water quality: Trophic Level Index" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52537
Data type Table
Row count 5632
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal water quality_all results by site

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4418
18
Added
28 Jun 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Jun 2017.

Table ID 53632
Data type Table
Row count 371
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM10 concentrations in towns and cities 2006–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4355
61
Added
02 Dec 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 02 Dec 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main human-made source of PM10.

PM10 is of particular concern because it is found in high concentrations in some areas and can damage health. It is associated with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Annual average PM10 concentrations in towns and cities" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52625
Data type Table
Row count 648
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily peak UV index value, 1981–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4376
26
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Daily peak UV index values at Invercargill, Lauder (Otago region), Christchurch, Paraparaumu (Wellington region), and Leigh (Auckland region). The strength of UV light is expressed as a solar UV index, starting from 0 (no UV) to 11+ (extreme).
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light helps our bodies make vitamin D, which we need for healthy bones and muscles. However, too much exposure to UV light can cause skin cancer. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, and monitoring UV levels helps us understand the occurrence of skin cancer.
Ozone in the upper atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s UV light, protecting us from harmful levels. The amount of UV radiation reaching the ground varies in relation to changes in the atmospheric ozone concentrations. The Antarctic ozone hole lies well to the south of New Zealand and does not have a large effect on New Zealand’s ozone concentrations.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89468
Data type Table
Row count 38993
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions summary data, 1990–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4353
45
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions source and sink summary data by sector and gas for 1990-2015. Data are sourced from the 1990-2015 New Zealand Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89429
Data type Table
Row count 26
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lightning strikes, 2001–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4247
137
Added
16 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2017.

Lightning is the discharge of electricity from thunderstorms and can occur within a cloud, between clouds, or between a cloud and the ground. By international standards, lightning does not occur frequently around New Zealand. However, ground strikes can injure or kill people and livestock, damage property and infrastructure, and, although rarely in New Zealand, spark forest fires. Thunderstorms are often associated with other severe weather events, such as strong wind gusts and hail. Thunderstorms may increase in frequency and intensity with climate change.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89470
Data type Table
Row count 2903389
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Carbon dioxide concentrations at Baring Head (1972–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4356
18
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Greenhouse gases (GHGS) in the atmosphere absorb heat radiating from Earth, warming the atmosphere. Emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases. Increases in these gases increase ocean acidity and are extremely likely to contribute to increased global temperatures, sea levels, and glacier melt. Monitoring GHG concentrations allows us to infer long-term impacts on ocean acidity, temperature, sea level, and glaciers.
Greenhouse gases are generally well mixed around the globe. We use ‘clean air’ observations from Baring Head, near Wellington, to estimate global concentrations of the greenhouse gases – carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). These observations are made only when the air’s trajectory is from the south and away from any likely local sources of gas emissions. This gives an estimate representative of the concentrations over the Southern Ocean.
The observations tell us how the global atmosphere responds to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, and are an internationally representative measure of global concentrations. However, the Southern Hemisphere has slightly less greenhouse gas concentrations than the Northern Hemisphere, as well as a smaller seasonal variation.
Further information can be found in:
Mikaloff Fletcher, SE, & Nichol, S (2014) Measurements of Trace Gases in Well-mixed Air at Baring Head: Trends in carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/cZzREp on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Greenhouse gas concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52568
Data type Table
Row count 493
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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