Lake water quality trends 2008–2017 1998–2017 and 1990–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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922
9
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

This dataset contains ten lake water quality variables based on measurements made at monitored lake sites: chlorophyll-a, nitrate-nitrogen, total nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, total phosphorus, Escherichia coli, water clarity, and lake trophic level index (TLI3 and TLI4). This dataset includes: - Median values for the period 2013 to 2017 - For selected indicators, how these values compare to the National Objectives Framework (NOF) (MfE, 2017) bands related to ecosystem health When nitrogen and phosphorus accumulate above certain concentrations in lakes (referred to as ‘nutrient enrichment’), they can stimulate excessive growth of algae and cyanobacteria. Chlorophyll-a is a measure of the phytoplankton (algae) biomass. The lake trophic level index (TLI) indicates the health of a lake based on concentrations of three variables:
· total nitrogen
· total phosphorus
· chlorophyll-a.

Water clarity is a measure of underwater visibility. Lakes with poor clarity and TLI are poor habitats for some species of animals and plants, and they may not be suitable for recreation. Ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to aquatic life if concentrations are high enough.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at: www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/fresh-water/water-qua...

Table ID 99873
Data type Table
Row count 609
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Heavy metals in coastal and estuarine sediment 2009 and 2012–2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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895
6
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

This indicator measures the concentrations of four heavy metals (lead, copper, zinc and cadmium) against the Australian & New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) guideline values for toxic substances in estuarine sediment.

Heavy metals occur naturally in estuaries, but high concentrations suggest contamination from another source. The metals can be transported along waterways from urban environments (and, for cadmium, from farmland) and accumulate in estuarine and coastal sediments. Heavy metals are toxic although some such as copper and zinc are classed as micro-nutrients at very low concentrations. They accumulate in sediment, where they can be taken up by organisms, and are harmful to species and habitats. They also bio-accumulate (are found in higher concentrations in species further up the food chain).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99880
Data type Table
Row count 4852
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Livestock numbers 1971–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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886
11
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

This data measures the numbers of farmed livestock (dairy and beef cattle, deer, and sheep) over time across New Zealand.

Livestock farming is a widespread land use in New Zealand and is a large contributor to our economy. High livestock numbers and the distribution of livestock across land environments can affect indigenous biodiversity and soil health (eg through erosion, habitat loss, compaction, and nutrient concentration). Water quality can also be adversely affected, as nutrients, sediment, and bacteria from urine and faeces can leach or run off the land into rivers, lakes, and groundwaters. This can affect the health of the aquatic ecosystem, as well as recreation and cultural values associated with rivers and lakes.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99879
Data type Table
Row count 4240
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrogen and phosphorus in fertilisers APS 2002 2007 2012 and 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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884
5
Added
15 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Apr 2019.

The data shows tonnes of nitrogen applied calculated from the application of urea, diammonium phosphate (DAP), and ammonium sulphate (SOA) in New Zealand.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99863
Data type Table
Row count 1044
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Irrigated land 2002 and 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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885
7
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

This dataset shows the total irrigated agricultural land area across New Zealand for 2002 and 2017. Agricultural land irrigated in 2017 is broken down by types of irrigation systems and farm type.

Although it enables and improves farming, irrigation can also have adverse consequences relating to recreation, and can increase pollution and leaching of contaminants into waterways. Irrigation can affect the natural form and character of land (eg dry land to greener and wetter land), fishing, cultivation and food production, animal drinking water, water supply, commercial and industrial water use, and hydro-electric power generation. More irrigated land, and more water abstraction, can place increased pressure on river flows, as well as indirectly increasing pressure on land and fresh water by enabling increased agricultural intensity.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99878
Data type Table
Row count 36
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Acidity (pH) of subantarctic waters east of New Zealand (1998–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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841
25
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Ocean acidification, measured by the reduction in sea water pH, is mainly caused by oceans absorbing and storing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Ocean acidification affects marine species in various ways. The growth and survival rates of some shell-building species are affected because they struggle to build their shells. The behaviour and physiology of some fish is also affected. This could influence marine ecosystems and commercial, customary, and recreational fishing or harvesting.
This dataset relates to the "Ocean acidification" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52522
Data type Table
Row count 588
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater pesticides survey, 2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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854
13
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Pesticides, which include insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and plant growth regulators, are commonly used in New Zealand to control insects, diseases and weeds in primary industries such as agricultural farming, forestry and horticulture. Once applied to land or crops, pesticides can make their way through soil and enter groundwater systems.

File contains whether a pesticide was detected at monitored wells, and if so, what the concentration is. File also includes surrounding land use, well use, well diameter, well depth, and screen depth, where available.

Table ID 53605
Data type Table
Row count 153
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrogen phosphorus and potassium in fertilisers Fertiliser Association 1990–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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859
3
Added
15 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Apr 2019.

Industry estimates of fertiliser nutrient consumption in New Zealand 1990–2015.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99866
Data type Table
Row count 78
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Commercial catch for sharks and rays

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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772
27
Added
24 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Oct 2016.

New Zealand waters have at least 117 species of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, and other cartilaginous fish species). They are particularly vulnerable to overfishing because they are long-lived, mature slowly, and have a low reproductive rate. Chondrichthyans are important for healthy ocean ecosystems, and reporting their commercial catch and bycatch helps us understand the sustainability of our fisheries.

Table ID 53508
Data type Table
Row count 453
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality trends 2005–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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768
9
Added
15 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Apr 2019.

This dataset measures groundwater quality in New Zealand’s aquifers based on measurements made at monitored sites. Many factors influence the quality of our groundwater. Nitrogen, which occurs naturally in groundwater, can increase in concentrations due to agricultural and urban land use, and infrastructure such as waste treatment plants. High concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes that receive inflows from groundwater. Ammoniacal nitrogen can cause an undesirable smell that may make groundwater unsuitable for drinking water. Natural processes in groundwater can convert nitrate-nitrogen into ammoniacal nitrogen or other forms under some chemical conditions. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. Too much nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E. coli in groundwater is measured in colony forming units (cfu) and can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99856
Data type Table
Row count 448
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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