Estimated fish and invertebrate bycatch in deep-water fisheries by year (1991–2012)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2808
51
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

The unintended catch of marine species other than the target species puts pressure on the populations of marine species by removing individuals or potentially modifying ecosystems.
This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of fish and invertebrates" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52500
Data type Table
Row count 176
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated fur seal captures in trawl and longline fisheries by fishery type (1999–2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3056
8
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

Sea lions and fur seals are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters, along with seabirds and dolphins. Trawling poses a risk to both species. Fur seals can also be captured by other fishing gear, including long lines. Estimating the bycatch of sea lions and fur seals indicates the pressures they face from current fishing practices.
The New Zealand fur seal Arctocephalus forsteri is classified as not threatened with extinction and its population appears to be increasing and extending back into its historical range (where they were commonly found) (Baker et al, 2010). They have a wide distribution, but are more common in the southern parts of New Zealand.
The Fisheries Act 1996 designates the New Zealand fur seal as protected and requires mitigation measures to reduce bycatch (Ministry for Primary Industries, 2014).

Table ID 53470
Data type Table
Row count 32
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated fur seal captures in trawl and longline fisheries by fishery type (2003–13)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2569
13
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Sea lions and fur seals are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters, along with seabirds and dolphins. Estimating the bycatch of sea lions and fur seals indicates the pressures they face from current fishing practices.
The New Zealand fur seal Arctocephalus forsteri is classified as not threatened. Its population appears to be increasing and extending back into its historical range (where they were commonly found) (Baker et al, 2010).
The Fisheries Act 1996 designates this species as protected and requires mitigation measures to reduce bycatch (Ministry for Primary Industries, 2014).
This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: sea lion and fur seal" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52497
Data type Table
Row count 44
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated sea lion captures in all trawl fisheries (1996–2014)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3029
11
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

Sea lions and fur seals are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters, along with seabirds and dolphins. Trawling poses a risk to both species. Fur seals can also be captured by other fishing gear, including long lines. Estimating the bycatch of sea lions and fur seals indicates the pressures they face from current fishing practices.
The New Zealand sea lion Phocarctos hookeri is threatened with extinction and is classified as nationally critical. Its population is steadily falling at some breeding locations (Baker et al, 2010). Fisheries are one of the pressures on the species.
The Fisheries Act 1996 designates this species as protected and requires mitigation measures to reduce bycatch (Ministry for Primary Industries, 2014).

Table ID 53471
Data type Table
Row count 19
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Sea lions and fur seals are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters, along with seabirds and dolphins. Estimating the bycatch of sea lions and fur seals indicates the pressures they face from current fishing practices.
The New Zealand sea lion Phocarctos hookeri is threatened with extinction and is classified as nationally critical. Its population is steadily falling at some breeding locations. Fisheries are one of the pressures on the species.
The Fisheries Act 1996 designates this species as protected and requires mitigation measures to reduce bycatch (Ministry for Primary Industries, 2014).This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: sea lion and fur seal" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52496
Data type Table
Row count 25
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Fishing effort (number of dredge tows) by year (1990–2014)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2698
38
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Seabed trawling is the practice of towing fishing nets near or along the ocean floor. The towing process can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed. This creates sediment plumes that change light conditions. This can affect marine species (for example by limiting their capacity to generate energy through photosynthesis) and smother sensitive species.
This dataset relates to the "Commercial seabed trawling and dredging" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52505
Data type Table
Row count 50
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Fishing effort (number of trawl tows) by year (1990–2014)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3510
77
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Seabed trawling is the practice of towing fishing nets near or along the ocean floor. The towing process can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed, creating sediment plumes that can smother sensitive species and change light conditions. This can affect marine species (eg by limiting their ability to generate energy through photosynthesis).
This dataset relates to the "Commercial seabed trawling and dredging" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52504
Data type Table
Row count 75
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Heavy metal exceedances in estuarine and coastal sediment (2010–14)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2875
40
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Heavy metals occur naturally in estuaries, but high concentrations suggest contamination from another source. The metals can be transported along waterways from urban environments (and, for cadmium, from farmland) and accumulate in estuarine and coastal sediments. They are toxic and accumulate in fish and shellfish. We focus on four heavy metals: lead, copper, zinc, and cadmium.
This dataset relates to the "Heavy metal load in sediment" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52509
Data type Table
Row count 375
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Heavy metals in coastal and estuarine sediment 2009 and 2012–2018

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1537
6
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

This indicator measures the concentrations of four heavy metals (lead, copper, zinc and cadmium) against the Australian & New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) guideline values for toxic substances in estuarine sediment.

Heavy metals occur naturally in estuaries, but high concentrations suggest contamination from another source. The metals can be transported along waterways from urban environments (and, for cadmium, from farmland) and accumulate in estuarine and coastal sediments. Heavy metals are toxic although some such as copper and zinc are classed as micro-nutrients at very low concentrations. They accumulate in sediment, where they can be taken up by organisms, and are harmful to species and habitats. They also bio-accumulate (are found in higher concentrations in species further up the food chain).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99880
Data type Table
Row count 4852
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths (1921–2015)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3184
36
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

The Hector’s and Māui dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. These coastal dolphins are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). Māui dolphins are found on the west coast of the North Island, most often between Maunganui Bluff, north of Dargaville, and New Plymouth. Hector’s dolphins are mostly found around the South Island. Both subspecies are threatened with extinction. The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui dolphin is nationally critical. Dolphins can become entangled in fishing gear used by both commercial and recreational fishers, with set nets posing a particularly high risk. Reporting the bycatch of protected species helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
We report on two aspects of Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths based on data extracted from the Department of Conservation (DOC) Incident Database for 1921–2015: the number of dolphin deaths by cause of death, including a comparison of deaths over 1996–2015; and the number of dolphin deaths from entanglement by type of fishing gear.

Table ID 53475
Data type Table
Row count 561
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
Results 31 to 40 of 76