Annual mean sea level (relative to land) (1900–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2021
104
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Sea-level rise is a consequence of climate change. Increases in global temperature cause ocean waters to expand, and glaciers and ice sheets to melt into oceans. Sea-level rise affects estuaries, coastal wetlands, and intertidal and sub-tidal habitats and species. The increased likelihood of coastal erosion from sea-level rise presents a risk for seaside communities and their infrastructure, and for the marine environment itself, from increased suspended sediments.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal sea-level rise" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52523
Data type Table
Row count 575
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Water quality parameters in coastal and estuarine environments (2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand

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1416
57
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Coastal and estuarine ecosystems are affected by changes in the levels of nutrients, oxygen, and light. An overload of nutrients can be toxic or lead to algal blooms. These blooms can kill marine life by depleting oxygen levels. Suspended sediment can smother habitats or reduce light levels, affecting photosynthesis. We report on five measures of water quality: turbidity (murkiness), dissolved oxygen, and the dissolved nutrients nitrate- and nitrite-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and total phosphorus.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal and estuarine water quality" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52508
Data type Table
Row count 1623
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal sea level rise, 1891–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1038
21
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Sea-level rise is a consequence of climate change. Increased global temperatures lead to rising sea-levels because warmer waters take up more space and glaciers and polar ice sheets melt into the ocean. Sea-level varies naturally from place to place due to local ocean circulation and temperatures and the movement of the land relative to the sea. For example, earthquakes can lift or drop the land.
Linear trends were provided by NIWA and Emeritus Professor John Hannah (previously University of Otago). Ideally, linear trends in sea level would be reported if there are at least 50 years of data to account for climate variability from climate oscillations such as the 20–30 year Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) and the shorter ENSO cycle. Such climate variability can be seen in the increase in annual mean sea level in 1999–2000, when the IPO across the entire Pacific Ocean changed to a negative phase. While the Moturiki data cover 43 years, it was considered appropriate to apply a linear trend to further extend the number of reported sites. Further detail on the data processing (including adjustments for historic datum changes) and methods used for the trend analysis can be found in Hannah (1990), Hannah (2004), and Hannah and Bell (2012).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89454
Data type Table
Row count 533
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin deaths (1921–2008)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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966
17
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

The Hector’s and Māui’s dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. They are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui’s dolphin is nationally critical. Reporting incidental dolphin deaths from fishing helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52498
Data type Table
Row count 65
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine reserves (2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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942
25
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand’s four million km2 marine environment is diverse, with a range of coastal habitats and offshore seabed environments. We also have many marine species found only in New Zealand. Marine protected areas conserve or manage some of these unique habitats and species, while a range of other tools also provide marine protection. We report on the area covered by marine reserves as an indirect measure to understand the state of the marine environment.

Table ID 52518
Data type Table
Row count 28
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Time series for two coastal sea surface temperature monitoring stations (1953–2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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933
26
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Coastal sea-surface temperature is influenced by solar heating and cooling, latitude, and local geography. It is hard for some marine species to survive when the sea temperature changes. This can affect marine ecosystems and processes. It can also affect fish-farming industries based in our coastal areas.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52525
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of seabird species and subspecies (2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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820
18
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand has 92 seabird and 14 shorebird species and subspecies (taxa). We have the highest number of endemic seabirds (found only in a particular area) in the world. Nearly 25 percent of the world’s seabird species breed in the New Zealand region, and almost 10 percent only breed here. Seabirds and shorebirds tend to be at or near the top of the food chain, and thrive only if the marine ecosystem is healthy. Decreasing bird populations can signal that the ecosystem is degrading.
This dataset relates to the "Conservation status of seabirds and shorebirds" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52511
Data type Table
Row count 92
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine pests in ports (2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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801
16
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Marine exotic species arrive in New Zealand waters on the hulls of international vessels (biofouling) or in discharged ballast waters. Some have little impact or cannot survive in New Zealand waters. Others are pests that can out-compete indigenous species and alter ecosystems. Marine pests could threaten our cultural and natural heritage, as well as economic activities such as commercial and recreational fishing, shellfish harvesting, and aquaculture.
This dataset relates to the "Marine pests" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52521
Data type Table
Row count 11
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ocean acidification, 1998–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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778
14
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

The pH of New Zealand subantarctic waters is calculated from pCO2 (dissolved carbon dioxide) and alkalinity measurements using refitted Mehrbach constants (see Mehrbach et al, 1973; Dickson & Millero, 1987), and in-situ temperature taken from the Munida time-series transect off the Otago coast. Measurements of pCO2 are taken every two months.
The Munida transect, in the subantarctic waters off Otago, is the Southern Hemisphere’s longest-running record of pH measurements (NIWA, 2015).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89461
Data type Table
Row count 660
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Mean, maximum and minimum coastal sea surface temperature (1953–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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694
36
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Coastal sea-surface temperature is influenced by solar heating and cooling, latitude, and local geography. It is hard for some marine species to survive when the sea temperature changes. This can affect marine ecosystems and processes. It can also affect fish-farming industries based in our coastal areas.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52524
Data type Table
Row count 33
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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