Change in farm size, 2002–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3834
48
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The area of farms involved in agricultural activities, and how this is changing, is important because agricultural activities can affect soil health and water.

Agricultural activities include beef and sheep, dairy, arable, horticulture, deer, pigs, and other livestock.

Table ID 95342
Data type Table
Row count 584
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Change in farm numbers, 2002–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3966
45
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The number of farms involved in agricultural activities, and how they are changing, is important because agricultural activities can affect soil health and water.

Agricultural activities include beef and sheep, dairy, arable, horticulture, deer, pigs, and other livestock.

Table ID 95340
Data type Table
Row count 560
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of indigenous land species, 2010–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4338
40
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

New Zealand has unique indigenous plants and animals that are our national taonga (treasures). Because most are endemic (found nowhere else in the world) New Zealand makes an important contribution to global biodiversity. Biodiversity is important for ecosystem processes, te ao Māori including mahinga kai (customary food gathering), and culture and recreation.

The conservation status of our biodiversity represents their risk of extinction. This data covers the conservation status, and most-recent change in status, of native and resident taxa for which we had sufficient information on abundance and distribution. This includes bats, birds, earthworms, lichens, plants, reptiles and frogs, snails, spiders, and insects.

We also include the number of species that have had a genuine change in conservation status between assessment periods.Where conservation status changed, this measure also looked at the NCTCS listings done in 2012 for birds (Robertson et al, 2017); 2012 for reptiles (Hitchmough et al, 2015); and 2010 for Orthoptera (Trewick et al, 2012). A change in a species’ conservation status reflects a change in its risk of extinction.

For more information on the Department of Conservation’s Threat Classification System (NZTCS) please refer to: www.doc.govt.nz/nztcs

Table ID 95341
Data type Table
Row count 8679
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bird species on public conservation land, estimated abundance 2013–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4049
25
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The status of our bird communities is an important indicator of the condition of our ecosystems. Many indigenous birds play key ecological roles, including dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers. In some situations, exotic bird species (not indigenous to New Zealand) can partially fulfil these roles. A reduction in the distribution and/or decline in numbers for common and widespread species can equate to large losses of individuals and ecosystem integrity. By measuring the composition of bird communities across public conservation land (forest and non-forest sites) we can monitor how they change over time.

This measure reports on the estimated abundance of seven common bird species on public conservation land, 2013–2016.Common species are species having occupancy over half of public conservation land.

Table ID 95337
Data type Table
Row count 56
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bird species on public conservation land, estimated diversity 2013–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3800
19
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The status of our bird communities is an important indicator of the condition of our ecosystems. Many indigenous birds play key ecological roles, including dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers. In some situations, exotic bird species (not indigenous to New Zealand) can partially fulfil these roles. A reduction in the distribution and/or decline in numbers for common and widespread species can equate to large losses of individuals and ecosystem integrity. By measuring the composition of bird communities across public conservation land (forest and non–forest sites) we can monitor how they change over time.

This measure reports on the predicted richness (diversity) of bird species on public conservation land, by monitoring site, 2013–2016.

Table ID 95338
Data type Table
Row count 1056
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bird species on public conservation land, estimated occupancy 2013–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3741
10
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The status of our bird communities is an important indicator of the condition of our ecosystems. Many indigenous birds play key ecological roles, including dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers. In some situations, exotic bird species (not indigenous to New Zealand) can partially fulfill these roles. A reduction in the distribution and/or decline in numbers for common and widespread species can equate to large losses of individuals and ecosystem integrity. By measuring the composition of bird communities across public conservation land (forest and non-forest sites) we can monitor how they change over time.

This measure reports on the occupancy of indigenous and exotic bird species on public conservation land, by wood cover, averaged over surveys from 2013 to 2016.

Table ID 95339
Data type Table
Row count 156
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Use of Maori land, livestock, 2006–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3999
20
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Land (whenua) is taonga tuku iho (cultural property, heritage) and of special importance to Māori. As the whakapūmautanga (legacy for the future), whenua provides for cultivation and storage of traditional foods and plants – for customary use and mahinga kai, and helps sustain each generation.

We report only on the available data we have, which cover a subset of Māori land used for primary production activities. We report on the number of livestock on maori-owned farms for main livestock types (eg farmed beef and dairy cattle, sheep, and deer) for the years 2006-16.

Table ID 95352
Data type Table
Row count 792
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Use of Māori land, land use, 2006–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4252
22
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Land (whenua) is taonga tuku iho (cultural property, heritage) and of special importance to Māori. As the whakapūmautanga (legacy for the future), whenua provides for cultivation and storage of traditional foods and plants – for customary use and mahinga kai, and helps sustain each generation.

We report only on the available data we have, which cover a subset of Māori land used for primary production activities. The main land use types covered are grassland, forest plantation, bush and scrub, and horticulture.

Table ID 95351
Data type Table
Row count 990
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Land cover change, 1996–2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3972
30
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Land cover describes the extent of vegetation, water bodies, built environments, and bare natural surfaces (eg gravel and rock) across New Zealand. Measuring the composition of and changes in land cover can help us understand the pressures that different land uses are placing on the biodiversity and functioning of ecosystems.

This measure reports on land cover by class, regional council area, and change over time in hectares and percentage.

For more information on the Landcover Database please refer to: lris.scinfo.org.nz/layer/48423-lcdb-v41-land-cover...

Table ID 95350
Data type Table
Row count 4145
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Use of public conservation land, concessions, 2012–17

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3963
20
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

One third of our land area is held as public conservation land and managed by the Department of Conservation (DOC) to protect natural and cultural heritage, retain areas of wilderness and enable recreation opportunities. Although the use of public conservation land makes an important socio-economic contribution at the local, regional and national level, increasing human activities on our protected areas can put pressure on these environments and degrade their cultural and aesthetic value.

This measure reports on the number of active recreation and non-recreation concessions by activity in each financial year, and the number of active concession operators (concessionaires) by activity in each financial year.

Table ID 95349
Data type Table
Row count 432
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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