Trends in groundwater quality, 2005–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7014
26
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Groundwater quality indicators include E.coli, nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Also included is data on pesticides, iron, manganese, electrical conductivity, and total dissolved solids. Information on sampling protocol, equipment, and method is provided.

Nitrogen occurs naturally in groundwater, but usually at very low concentrations. Agricultural and urban land use can add more nitrate-nitrogen to groundwater. If used for drinking water, high levels of nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes. Ammoniacal nitrogen is undesirable if groundwater is used for drinking, and elevated levels of nitrate and ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other animals. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. It can also be present naturally from interactions between groundwater and rocks. Too much phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E.coli in fresh water can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

This dataset relates to trends in four groundwater quality indicators: nitrate nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, and E.coli. throughout New Zealand over the 10-year period 2005–2014.

Table ID 53604
Data type Table
Row count 1683
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Autumn rainfall trends, 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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7019
18
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Autumn rainfall trends for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89402
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Soil health and land use - Soil sites within target range for all indicators, by land use 2009-2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7017
17
Added
20 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 20 Apr 2017.

NEW FILE 21/04/2017
(See "Land domain updates" page for details; www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/environment/env...)

Different land uses put pressure on the land environment and can result in changes to soil health. Healthy soil supports the productivity of agriculture and forestry, and filters water to help prevent waterways becoming contaminated. Soils are considered healthy if they fall within the target ranges for the indicators of acidity, fertility, organic reserves, and physical status.

This dataset relates to the "Soil health and land use" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

For raw data see "2015 land aotearoa soil health data for release.xlsx" at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LTBnRL

Table ID 53595
Data type Table
Row count 4
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lightning by region

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7009
23
Added
11 Nov 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Nov 2016.

Lightning is the discharge of electricity from thunderstorms. Ground strikes can cause significant damage to property and infrastructure, and injure or kill people and livestock. Lightning is often associated with other severe weather events, such as strong wind gusts. Thunderstorms may increase in frequency and intensity with climate change.
This dataset relates to the "Lightning" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 53515
Data type Table
Row count 621924
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

El Niño Southern Oscillation Index (1909–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6938
91
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is an important predictor of how tropical oceans and climate might influence New Zealand’s climate. Being able to predict the timing and intensity of an El Niño or La Niña climate phase is important in predicting and preparing for extreme climatic conditions, such as strong winds, heavy rain, or drought. Such extreme conditions can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities. ENSO is commonly measured using the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI).
In New Zealand, an El Niño phase can cause colder winters. In summer it can result in more rain in the west and drought in the east. A La Niña phase can cause warmer temperatures, more rain in the north-east, and less rain in the south and south-west.
This dataset relates to the "El Niño Southern Oscillation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52589
Data type Table
Row count 1729
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual maximum three-day rainfall totals (1950–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6955
66
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

A three-day rainfall measurement covers a single sustained rain event or a series of shorter events over a three-day period. Such measurements help us understand and prepare for flooding or rain-induced slips that could cause damage.
Further information can be found in:
Tait, A, Macara, G, & Paul, V. (2014) Preparation of climate datasets for the 2015 Environmental Synthesis Report: Temperature, Rainfall, Wind, Sunshine and Soil Moisture. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Fwn9AL on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Annual maximum three-day rainfall" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52580
Data type Table
Row count 1920
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual rainfall trends, 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6951
65
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Annual rainfall trends for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89400
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Primary use and source of consented freshwater takes, 2013–14

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6904
111
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Regional councils issue resource consents for the taking of fresh water for various purposes, including irrigation, drinking, hydroelectricity, and industry. Water can be taken from surface water or groundwater.

The file provides the primary source and primary use of the water take for each consented take.

Table ID 53613
Data type Table
Row count 16154
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Emissions from burning wood or coal for home heating 2006 and 2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6987
31
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

In 2013, 37 percent of homes burned wood and 4 percent burned coal for heating. Burning wood or coal for home heating emits a range of air pollutants. It is the main human-made source of particulate matter and a significant contributor of carbon monoxide. Exposure to these pollutants can damage health, with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer.

The proportions of homes using wood or coal for heating vary around the country. Generally, the use of wood and coal for home heating is greater in the South Island than in the North Island. The West Coast has the highest proportion (72 percent use wood, 56 percent use coal), while in contrast Auckland has lower usage (23 percent use wood and 2 percent use coal). Burning wood or coal for home heating continues to be associated with air quality issues, including high levels of PM10, PM2.5, arsenic, and benzo(a)pyrene at some locations.

This dataset relates to the "Home-heating emissions" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52451
Data type Table
Row count 20
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Mean annual sea-surface temperatures (1993–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6961
43
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Sea surface temperature changes with climate drivers such as El Niño, and will change with climate change. The sea surface temperature anomaly provides an indication of the heat change in the ocean.
Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.
The oceanic sea surface temperature data comes from the NIWA Sea surface temperature Archive (NSA). There are 2 datasets, NSA Annual Means and NSA Annual Anomolies ,covering the Tasman, subtropical (STW) and Southern Antarctic (SAW) area and the total area. The data is available from 1993 to 2013 and the unit of measure is degrees Celsius .
For more information please see:
Uddstrom, MJ (2015) Sea Surface Temperature Data and Analysis for the 2015 Synthesis Report. For Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/hRbGUJ on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz).
Trend results can be found in the excel file "Sea surface temperature trend statistics" found at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/DGXFS6.
This dataset relates to the "Sea surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52581
Data type Table
Row count 84
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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