Trends in groundwater quality, 2005–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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979
12
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Groundwater quality indicators include E.coli, nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Also included is data on pesticides, iron, manganese, electrical conductivity, and total dissolved solids. Information on sampling protocol, equipment, and method is provided.

Nitrogen occurs naturally in groundwater, but usually at very low concentrations. Agricultural and urban land use can add more nitrate-nitrogen to groundwater. If used for drinking water, high levels of nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes. Ammoniacal nitrogen is undesirable if groundwater is used for drinking, and elevated levels of nitrate and ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other animals. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. It can also be present naturally from interactions between groundwater and rocks. Too much phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E.coli in fresh water can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

This dataset relates to trends in four groundwater quality indicators: nitrate nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, and E.coli. throughout New Zealand over the 10-year period 2005–2014.

Table ID 53604
Data type Table
Row count 1683
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater pesticides survey, 2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

701
5
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Pesticides, which include insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and plant growth regulators, are commonly used in New Zealand to control insects, diseases and weeds in primary industries such as agricultural farming, forestry and horticulture. Once applied to land or crops, pesticides can make their way through soil and enter groundwater systems.

File contains whether a pesticide was detected at monitored wells, and if so, what the concentration is. File also includes surrounding land use, well use, well diameter, well depth, and screen depth, where available.

Table ID 53605
Data type Table
Row count 153
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality, 1964–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

594
13
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

Groundwater quality indicators include E.coli, nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Also included is data on pesticides, iron, manganese, electrical conductivity, and total dissolved solids. Information on sampling protocol, equipment, and method is provided.

Nitrogen occurs naturally in groundwater, but usually at very low concentrations. Agricultural and urban land use can add more nitrate-nitrogen to groundwater. If used for drinking water, high levels of nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes. Ammoniacal nitrogen is undesirable if groundwater is used for drinking, and elevated levels of nitrate and ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other animals. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. It can also be present naturally from interactions between groundwater and rocks. Too much phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E.coli in fresh water can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

The file contains the raw data for all groundwater quality indicators. This dataset was used to calculate the percent exceedances of the drinking water standards for E.coli and nitrate-nitrogen over the period 2012–14.

Table ID 53602
Data type Table
Row count 111035
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality state 2010–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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0
0
Added
14 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Apr 2019.

This dataset measures groundwater quality in New Zealand’s aquifers based on measurements made at monitored lake sites. Many factors influence the quality of our groundwater. Nitrogen, which occurs naturally in groundwater, can increase in concentrations due to agricultural and urban land use, and infrastructure such as waste treatment plants. High concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes that receive inflows from groundwater. Ammoniacal nitrogen can cause an undesirable smell that may make groundwater unsuitable for drinking water. Natural processes in groundwater can convert nitrate-nitrogen into ammoniacal nitrogen or other forms under some chemical conditions. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. Too much nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E. coli in groundwater is measured in colony forming units (cfu) and can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99855
Data type Table
Row count 741
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality trends 2005–2014

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

0
0
Added
15 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Apr 2019.

This dataset measures groundwater quality in New Zealand’s aquifers based on measurements made at monitored lake sites. Many factors influence the quality of our groundwater. Nitrogen, which occurs naturally in groundwater, can increase in concentrations due to agricultural and urban land use, and infrastructure such as waste treatment plants. High concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes that receive inflows from groundwater. Ammoniacal nitrogen can cause an undesirable smell that may make groundwater unsuitable for drinking water. Natural processes in groundwater can convert nitrate-nitrogen into ammoniacal nitrogen or other forms under some chemical conditions. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. Too much nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E. coli in groundwater is measured in colony forming units (cfu) and can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99856
Data type Table
Row count 448
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed