Melanoma registration trends, 1996–2013

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2858
4
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

New Zealand and Australia have the world’s highest rates of melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer. Melanoma is mainly caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, usually from the sun. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, especially during summer.
The risk of developing melanoma is affected by factors such as skin colour and type, family history, and the amount of sun exposure. Melanoma can affect people at any age, but the chance of developing a melanoma increases with age. We report on age-standardised rates of melanoma to account for the increasing proportion of older people in our population.
Our data on melanoma registrations come from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and the Ministry of Health's Mortality Collection. The passing of the Cancer Registry Act 1993 and Cancer Registry Regulations 1994 led to significant improvements in data quality and coverage (Ministry of Health, 2013). A sharp increase in registrations after 1993 is likely to have been related to these legislative and regulatory changes; for this reason we have only analysed data from 1996.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89460
Data type Table
Row count 57
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Days with wind gusts greater than gale force (1975–13)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2817
36
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Strong wind events can cause significant damage, for example, to trees and buildings. They can occur with frontal weather systems and around strong convection events, such as thunderstorms. Global climate change may change the frequency of damaging wind events in almost all areas in New Zealand in winter and decrease the frequency in summer. Monitoring can help us gauge the potential of, and prepare for, such events.
Further information can be found in:
Tait, A, Macara, G, & Paul, V. (2014) Preparation of climate datasets for the 2015 Environmental Synthesis Report: Temperature, Rainfall, Wind, Sunshine and Soil Moisture. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Fwn9AL on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Occurrence of potentially damaging wind" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52585
Data type Table
Row count 8203
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern annular mode (1887–2014)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2822
28
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is an index that describes climate variation around the South Pole and Antarctica, as far north as New Zealand. It indicates short-term climate variations that can influence New Zealand’s climate. Such climate variations can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities.
The variation is caused by the movement of a low-pressure belt that generates westerly winds. During a negative phase, the low pressure belt moves north, towards the equator. In New Zealand, this can cause increased westerly winds, unsettled weather, and storm activity over most of the country. Over the southern oceans, there are relatively less westerly winds and less storm activity.
During a positive phase, the low pressure belt moves south towards Antarctica. In New Zealand, this can cause relatively light winds and more settled weather. Over the southern oceans, there is increased westerly winds and storm activity.
This dataset relates to the "Southern annular mode" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52592
Data type Table
Row count 128
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Water physical stocks for selected measures (1995–2014)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2817
24
Added
15 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2015.

New Zealand is a water-rich country. Water is found in a network of waterways and lakes, as ground water, in glaciers, and in the soil and plants. Changes in temperature and precipitation patterns affect our water stocks, for example leading to low flows or floods. Water physical stocks show how climate changes can impact on our environment, its ecosystems, and ultimately our lifestyles.
Further information can be found in:
Collins, D, Zammit, C, Willsman, A & Henderson, R (2015) Surface water components of New Zealand’s National WaterAccounts, 1995-2014. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment May 2015. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Tebsax on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Water physical stocks: precipitation and evapotranspiration" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.
Variables: Abstraction for Hydrogeneration, Change in Ice, Change in Lakes, Change in Snow, Change in Soil Moisture, Discharge by Hydrogeneration, Evapotranspiration, Inflow from other regions, Outflow to other regions, Outflow to sea, Precipitation, Total.

Table ID 52596
Data type Table
Row count 240
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Rainfall Intensity, 1960–2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2768
44
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Two measures of rainfall intensity - percent of annual precipitation in the 95th percentile (r95ptot) and annual maximum one-day rainfall (rx1day).
Intense rainfall can result in flash floods or land slips that damage homes and property, disrupt transportation, and endanger lives. It can also interfere with recreation and increase erosion. Changes to the frequency of intense rainfall events can alter biodiversity.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89435
Data type Table
Row count 1710
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

The annual SOI compared with New Zealand's detrended temperature series (1909–2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2793
20
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is an important predictor of how tropical oceans and climate might influence New Zealand’s climate. Being able to predict the timing and intensity of an El Niño or La Niña climate phase is important in predicting and preparing for extreme climatic conditions, such as strong winds, heavy rain, or drought. Such extreme conditions can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities. ENSO is commonly measured using the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI).
In New Zealand, an El Niño phase can cause colder winters. In summer it can result in more rain in the west and drought in the east. A La Niña phase can cause warmer temperatures, more rain in the north-east, and less rain in the south and south-west.
This dataset relates to the "El Niño Southern Oscillation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52590
Data type Table
Row count 105
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Melanoma registration rates, 1948–2015

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2779
10
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

New Zealand and Australia have the world’s highest rates of melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer. Melanoma is mainly caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, usually from the sun. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, especially during summer.
The risk of developing melanoma is affected by factors such as skin colour and type, family history, and the amount of sun exposure. Melanoma can affect people at any age, but the chance of developing a melanoma increases with age. We report on age-standardised rates of melanoma to account for the increasing proportion of older people in our population.
Our data on melanoma registrations come from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and the Ministry of Health's Mortality Collection. The passing of the Cancer Registry Act 1993 and Cancer Registry Regulations 1994 led to significant improvements in data quality and coverage (Ministry of Health, 2013). A sharp increase in registrations after 1993 is likely to have been related to these legislative and regulatory changes; for this reason we have only analysed data from 1996.
2014–15 data are provisional and subject to change.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89458
Data type Table
Row count 204
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated global production of major ozone-depleting substances (1986–2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2770
12
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone in the stratosphere is destroyed in a catalytic reaction with a range of chemical species (mainly CFCs) that are emitted through human activities. The emission of these ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) is closely related to the amount of the chemicals that are produced. The ozone layer absorbs most of the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Monitoring global ODS production helps us track how much pressure these substances put on the atmosphere.
In accordance with article 7 of the Montreal Protocol – Parties are required to report data on the production, import and export of specified ozone depleting substances covered in the original protocol and the amendments ratified by that Party. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Ozone Secretariat data centre is the source of the information reported.
This dataset relates to the "global emissions of ozone-depleting substances" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52566
Data type Table
Row count 4428
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual glacier ice volumes (1978–2014)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2726
30
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

A glacier is a body of slow-moving ice, at least one hectare in area that has persisted for two decades or longer. Glacier volume is strongly influenced by climate factors, such as temperature and precipitation. Changes in glacier ice volumes give some indication of changing climate conditions in New Zealand.
This dataset relates to the "Change in glacier ice volume" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52579
Data type Table
Row count 37
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual ground and sea lightning strikes (2001–14)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2735
16
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Lightning is the discharge of electricity from thunderstorms. Ground strikes can cause significant damage to property and infrastructure, and injure or kill people and livestock. Lightning is often associated with other severe weather events, such as strong wind gusts. Thunderstorms may increase in frequency and intensity with climate change.
This dataset relates to the "Lightning" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52587
Data type Table
Row count 15
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
Results 71 to 80 of 106