Rainfall, 1960 - 2019

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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637
36
Added
14 Oct 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2020.

DATA SOURCE: National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)
[Technical report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti...]

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Greenhouse gas concentrations" indicator [available at www.stats.govtnz/indicators/greenhouse-gas-concent...]

This lowest aggregation dataset, was used to develop two ‘Our Atmosphere and Climate’ indicators. See Statistics New Zealand indicator links for specific methodologies and state/trend datasets (see ‘Shiny App’ downloads).
1) Rainfall (www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/rainfall)
2) Extreme rainfall (a. www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/extreme-rainfall

This dataset shows daily rainfall at 30 sites across New Zealand from 1960 to 2019.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 105055
Data type Table
Row count 657450
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Rainfall, 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7023
276
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Daily rainfall values for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89401
Data type Table
Row count 617808
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ski field operating days (2003–14)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4827
27
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The climate can affect ski-field operations. Warm temperatures can result in less snow or shorter ski seasons. Extreme weather events such as storms can close fields. Monitoring the season length of ski fields and the percentage of days they are closed may indicate the extent of any effects of climate change. We assessed the season length and percentage of days closed for three South Island ski fields from 2003 to 2014.
This dataset relates to the "Ski-field operating days" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52571
Data type Table
Row count 180
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern annular mode (1887–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6084
31
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is an index that describes climate variation around the South Pole and Antarctica, as far north as New Zealand. It indicates short-term climate variations that can influence New Zealand’s climate. Such climate variations can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities.
The variation is caused by the movement of a low-pressure belt that generates westerly winds. During a negative phase, the low pressure belt moves north, towards the equator. In New Zealand, this can cause increased westerly winds, unsettled weather, and storm activity over most of the country. Over the southern oceans, there are relatively less westerly winds and less storm activity.
During a positive phase, the low pressure belt moves south towards Antarctica. In New Zealand, this can cause relatively light winds and more settled weather. Over the southern oceans, there is increased westerly winds and storm activity.
This dataset relates to the "Southern annular mode" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52592
Data type Table
Row count 128
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode annual values, 1887–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5770
33
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89383
Data type Table
Row count 168
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode monthly values, January 1979–December 2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5983
23
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89384
Data type Table
Row count 456
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode trend assessment, 1860–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6243
12
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89385
Data type Table
Row count 7
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Spring rainfall trends, 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4771
10
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Spring rainfall trends for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89403
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Summer rainfall trends, 1960–2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4891
14
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Summer rainfall trends for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89404
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

The annual SOI compared with New Zealand's detrended temperature series (1909–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4733
22
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is an important predictor of how tropical oceans and climate might influence New Zealand’s climate. Being able to predict the timing and intensity of an El Niño or La Niña climate phase is important in predicting and preparing for extreme climatic conditions, such as strong winds, heavy rain, or drought. Such extreme conditions can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities. ENSO is commonly measured using the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI).
In New Zealand, an El Niño phase can cause colder winters. In summer it can result in more rain in the west and drought in the east. A La Niña phase can cause warmer temperatures, more rain in the north-east, and less rain in the south and south-west.
This dataset relates to the "El Niño Southern Oscillation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52590
Data type Table
Row count 105
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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