Annual growing degree days

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4317
82
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Growing degree days (GDD) is the measure of how much warmth is available for plant and insect growth during a growing season. GDD information helps horticulturists and farmers predict plant growth and stock development. The GDD value changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño. Long-term changes in GDD are a measure of changing climate conditions.
Further information can be found in:
Tait, A, Macara, G, & Paul, V. (2014) Preparation of climate datasets for the 2015 Environmental Synthesis Report: Temperature, Rainfall, Wind, Sunshine and Soil Moisture. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Fwn9AL on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Growing degree days" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52574
Data type Table
Row count 12168
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand's greenhouse gas emissions (1990–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4184
63
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Our greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are small compared with those of other developed nations, but we have committed to being part of the global response to climate change. New Zealand's greenhouse gas inventory is an annual report on all of the country’s human-induced GHG emissions and removals of GHG emissions. The inventory is produced as part of our obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol.
Some GHG emissions are removed, primarily by forests. Net emissions represent the total amount of gas contributed to the atmosphere but gross emmissions are also provided for New Zealand.
This dataset relates to the "New Zealand's greenhouse gas emissions" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52565
Data type Table
Row count 24
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual average Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation Index (1871–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3510
63
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) describes the long-term oscillation of the Pacific Ocean. The Pacific climate oscillation causes climate fluctuations that can influence New Zealand’s climate. For example, it can affect the strength and frequency of El Niño and La Niña events. In New Zealand, the positive phase of the IPO is linked to stronger west to southwest winds and more rain to the west. Such climate phases can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities.
The IPO is similar, and nearly equivalent, to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The PDO is a predictor of the impact of the climate oscillation in the northern Pacific.
This dataset relates to the "Inter-decadal Pacific oscillation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52591
Data type Table
Row count 143
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Influenza hospital discharges (2000–13)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3226
38
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Influenza is a potentially life-threatening virus that spreads quickly from person to person. It is a significant public health issue in this country, with 10–20 percent of New Zealanders infected every year. While influenza outbreaks can occur all year round, rates peak in winter and spring. This is because the virus can survive longer outside the body in periods of colder weather and low absolute humidity (dry conditions).
This dataset relates to the "Influenza" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52553
Data type Table
Row count 28
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual maximum three-day rainfall totals (1950–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3155
50
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

A three-day rainfall measurement covers a single sustained rain event or a series of shorter events over a three-day period. Such measurements help us understand and prepare for flooding or rain-induced slips that could cause damage.
Further information can be found in:
Tait, A, Macara, G, & Paul, V. (2014) Preparation of climate datasets for the 2015 Environmental Synthesis Report: Temperature, Rainfall, Wind, Sunshine and Soil Moisture. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Fwn9AL on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Annual maximum three-day rainfall" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52580
Data type Table
Row count 1920
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Monthly El Niño Southern Oscillation Index, 1986–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3045
50
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the movement of warm equatorial water across the Pacific Ocean and the atmospheric response. It occurs every 2–7 years, typically lasting 6–18 months. ENSO has three phases: neutral, El Niño and La Niña. In New Zealand an El Niño phase in summer can bring increased westerly winds, more rain in the west, and drought in the east; in winter it can lead to more cool southerly winds. During a La Niña phase we may experience more north-easterly winds, wetter conditions in the north and east, and higher sea levels.
This dataset relates to monthly ENSO values.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89381
Data type Table
Row count 372
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Rainfall, 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2769
125
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Daily rainfall values for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89401
Data type Table
Row count 617808
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions sub-sector summary data, 1990 and 2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2808
36
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions data for 1990 and 2015. Data are sourced from the 1990–2015 New Zealand Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory. Emissions are provided by sector (Energy, Indistrail processes and product use, Agriculture, Land–use, land–use change and Forestry; and Waste) and sector subcategory. IPCC 2004 global warming potential values were used during conversion to CO2 equivalents. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster. Reducing emissions of CH4 and N2O will decrease concentrations in the atmosphere more quickly.Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89431
Data type Table
Row count 96
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily peak, noon, and SED UV (UVM dataset)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2695
35
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause skin cancer. Ozone absorbs some UV radiation, and UV levels can vary in relation to changes in atmospheric ozone. Monitoring UV levels can help us understand current skin cancer risk.
The most reliable data on solar UV irradiance in New Zealand are from spectroradiometers developed and operated by NIWA at Lauder since summer 1989/90. The dataset supplied begins in 1993, and measurements includee daily peak, noon-time mean, and total daily dose of erythemal (skin-reddening) UV.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "UV intensity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52583
Data type Table
Row count 7530
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Carbon dioxide concentrations at Baring Head (1972–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2698
15
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Greenhouse gases (GHGS) in the atmosphere absorb heat radiating from Earth, warming the atmosphere. Emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases. Increases in these gases increase ocean acidity and are extremely likely to contribute to increased global temperatures, sea levels, and glacier melt. Monitoring GHG concentrations allows us to infer long-term impacts on ocean acidity, temperature, sea level, and glaciers.
Greenhouse gases are generally well mixed around the globe. We use ‘clean air’ observations from Baring Head, near Wellington, to estimate global concentrations of the greenhouse gases – carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). These observations are made only when the air’s trajectory is from the south and away from any likely local sources of gas emissions. This gives an estimate representative of the concentrations over the Southern Ocean.
The observations tell us how the global atmosphere responds to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, and are an internationally representative measure of global concentrations. However, the Southern Hemisphere has slightly less greenhouse gas concentrations than the Northern Hemisphere, as well as a smaller seasonal variation.
Further information can be found in:
Mikaloff Fletcher, SE, & Nichol, S (2014) Measurements of Trace Gases in Well-mixed Air at Baring Head: Trends in carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/cZzREp on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Greenhouse gas concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52568
Data type Table
Row count 493
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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