PM2.5 concentrations, 2008–17

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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665
17
Added
15 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2018.

PM2.5 is made up of solid and liquid particles in the air with a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometres. In New Zealand, most PM2.5 in the air results from combustion (burning wood for home heating, motor-vehicle exhaust), and to a lesser extent, particles formed from reactions in the atmosphere (secondary PM) and naturally occurring sea salt.
Short- and long-term exposure to PM2.5, even at low levels, is linked to respiratory and cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of premature death, especially in vulnerable people (the young, the elderly, and people with respiratory illness). Emerging evidence points to possible links with cognitive function, neuro-development, and diabetes.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98413
Data type Table
Row count 33750
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Seasonality of PM2.5 exceedances

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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1890
12
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

PM2.5 are particles 2.5 micrometres or less in diameter. PM2.5 is emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (eg from vehicles). Natural sources have less influence on PM2.5 concentrations than PM10 concentrations. This means PM2.5 comes mainly from human activities. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main source of PM2.5.

PM2.5 is a component of PM10 and is associated with similar health effects, ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. However, the smaller PM2.5 particles are more closely associated with severe health problems.

This dataset relates to the "Seasonality of PM2.5 exceedances" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52435
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM2.5 exceedances 2008–13

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1654
17
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

PM2.5 are particles 2.5 micrometres or less in diameter. PM2.5 is emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (eg from vehicles). Natural sources have less influence on PM2.5 concentrations than PM10 concentrations. This means PM2.5 comes mainly from human activities. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main source of PM2.5.

PM2.5 is a component of PM10 and is associated with similar health effects, ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. However, the smaller PM2.5 particles are more closely associated with severe health problems.

Column headings:
- No_exceed - Number of exceedances
- Disp_graph - Displayed on graph (1= yes, 0 = no)

This dataset relates to the "PM2.5 concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52439
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM2.5 concentrations 2008–13

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

761
46
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

PM2.5 are particles 2.5 micrometres or less in diameter. PM2.5 is emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (eg from vehicles). Natural sources have less influence on PM2.5 concentrations than PM10 concentrations. This means PM2.5 comes mainly from human activities. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main source of PM2.5.

PM2.5 is a component of PM10 and is associated with similar health effects, ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. However, the smaller PM2.5 particles are more closely associated with severe health problems.

This dataset relates to the "PM2.5 concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52438
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed