Contribution of industry to key pollutants

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2461
16
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16 Sep 2015

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Industrial activities emit a range of pollutants that affect our air quality. The health effects associated with exposure to these pollutants range from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. Nationally, industrial activities are the main human-made source of sulphur dioxide emissions.

This dataset relates to the "Industrial emissions" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Further information can be found in Environet and Golders Associates (2015). Home heating emission inventory and other sources evaluation. Wellington: Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/a5FAw6 on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice.

Table ID 52452
Data type Table
Row count 20
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Absolute contribution of key sources

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2448
20
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16 Sep 2015

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Burning wood and coal for home heating, road motor vehicle use, industrial activities, and household outdoor burning are the key human-made sources of air pollutants in New Zealand. These pollutants have a range of health effects.
Measuring the contribution of each source helps us understand their pressures on our air quality. It also provides context for changes in emissions from individual sources. For example, from 2006 to 2013, PM10 emissions from road motor vehicles decreased 25 percent. However, this source contributed only 9 percent of the total national PM10 emissions from the four key sources. Therefore, this decrease in PM10 emissions from road motor vehicles likely had only a minor effect on total PM10 emissions.

Daily winter emissions and annual average emissions are presented as there is strong seasonality in emissions. Daily winter contributions were also assessed because this is the timeframe used by WHO and in national standards and winter months is when concentrations in excess of the standards most frequently occur.

This dataset relates to the "Relative contribution of key human-made emission sources" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Further information can be found in Environet and Golders Associates (2015). Home heating emission inventory and other sources evaluation. Wellington: Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/a5FAw6 on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice.

Table ID 52446
Data type Table
Row count 40
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Air pollutant emissions

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2423
34
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16 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2018.

An emissions inventory provides information on the amount of key air pollutants that are released into the atmosphere for a given location over a given time period. This enables us to identify sources of pollutants. By understanding the amounts that different sources contribute, air quality can be better managed and modelled.
We evaluated emissions for five key pollutants for 2015, the most-recent year that data were readily available: particulate matter (PM) less than 10 micrometres in diameter (PM10), PM less than 2.5 micrometres in diameter (PM2.5), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and sulphur dioxide (SO2), because they are the most important pollutants in New Zealand.
The grouped sources include: energy-related activities, construction dust, road dust, industrial process emissions (non-combustion), agriculture (emissions from animal housing), vegetation fires (burning agricultural residue and biomass burning), and incinerating of hazardous waste.
Only human-generated emissions were included in this emission inventory. No updated data for residential wood burning were available and was assumed to be the same as the 2013 national inventory.

Table ID 98424
Data type Table
Row count 26
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM10 concentrations in OECD urban areas

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2422
17
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16 Sep 2015

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Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) is an air pollutant that causes health problems ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer. Reporting on the annual PM10 concentrations in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries helps us understand the scale of PM10 pollution in New Zealand and how we rank internationally. The OECD consists of 34 countries with similar levels of economic development.

PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. PM10 also forms from reactions between gases or between gases and other particles.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Annual average PM10 concentrations in OECD countries (urban areas)" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52458
Data type Table
Row count 34
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Relative contribution of other sources

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2416
7
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16 Sep 2015

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Other human-made sources – such as aviation, forestry, and non-combustion industrial activities (eg grinding and crushing) – generally emit relatively small amounts of key air pollutants. Comparing their contribution to air pollution helps us understand the pressures they place on our air quality.

Other human-made sources of air pollution include but are not limited to:
- transport emissions from aviation, off-road motor vehicles, rail, and shipping transport activities
- non-combustion emissions from industry, such as process emissions (eg milk driers) and activities that involve abrasive and mechanical processes (eg grinding and crushing)
- agricultural and forestry activities, such as logging activities and agricultural burning.

This dataset relates to the "Relative contribution of other human-made emissions" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52436
Data type Table
Row count 20
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Health effects from PM10 2006 and 2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2376
10
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15 Oct 2015

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Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 is of particular concern because of high concentrations in some areas. It can also damage health, with associated effects ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer. This indicator considers PM10 from human-made sources, such as burning wood or coal for home heating or road motor vehicle emissions.

We report on the estimated number of premature deaths, hospitalisations, and restricted activity days for the New Zealand population from exposure to PM10 from human activities.

• Premature deaths are deaths, often preventable, that occur before a person reaches the age they were expected to live to.
• Hospitalisations relate to hospitalisations for respiratory and cardiac illnesses (not including cases leading to premature death).
• Restricted activity days occur when symptoms are sufficient to limit usual activities such as work or study.

This dataset relates to the "Health effects from exposure to PM10" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52598
Data type Table
Row count 18
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Natural and human made PM10

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2368
11
Added
16 Sep 2015

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We measure the annual concentrations and proportions of natural and anthropogenic particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10). PM10 in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources.

PM10 occurs naturally, for example, as sea salt, dust (airborne soil), or pollen. Airborne soil particles, although natural, are also produced by human-made processes such as construction and industrial activities. Natural particulates can make up a large portion of PM10 in some areas.

Research on the health effects of natural particulate matter is inconclusive, and the World Health Organization (WHO) considers all particulate matter of a certain size to be of equal toxicity. Natural particulates are generally in the PM2.5 to PM10 size range, which typically has less harmful health effects than smaller particles.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Natural particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10)" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52443
Data type Table
Row count 36
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Sulphur dioxide concentrations and exceedances 2005–13

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2346
30
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16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Sulphur dioxide (SO2) is a gas produced from human (eg industry and shipping) and natural (geothermal and volcanic) activities. Nationally, the main human-made source of sulphur oxides emissions is industry. SO2 is associated with respiratory problems, such as bronchitis, and can aggravate the symptoms of asthma and chronic lung disease.

Column headings:
- Disp_graph - Displayed on graph (1= yes, 0 = no)

This dataset relates to the "Sulphur dioxide concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52461
Data type Table
Row count 468
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

National PM10 exceedances 2006–13

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2341
15
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main human-made source of PM10.

PM10 is of particular concern because it is found in high concentrations in some areas and can damage health. It is associated with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer.

Column headings:
- No_airsheds = number of airsheds

This dataset relates to the "PM10 daily concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52459
Data type Table
Row count 40
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ozone concentrations 1996–2013

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2330
21
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Ozone occurs in two regions of Earth’s atmosphere – at ground level and in the upper atmosphere. Ground-level ozone is a gas formed by chemical reactions involving sunlight, volatile organic compounds, and nitrogen oxides (the main source being vehicle emissions). It is linked to increased health risks, such as respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

Given the time required for the chemical reactions that form ozone to take place, high concentrations of it occur well away and downwind from where the pollutants are initially emitted.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Ground-level ozone concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52450
Data type Table
Row count 54
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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