National PM10 concentrations 2006–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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1236
33
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main human-made source of PM10.

PM10 is of particular concern because it is found in high concentrations in some areas and can damage health. It is associated with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "PM10 annual average concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52442
Data type Table
Row count 8
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Road motor vehicle emissions

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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1208
28
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Road motor vehicles emit a range of air pollutants from their exhausts, and from brake and tyre wear. They are the main human-made source of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions. Exposure to these pollutants can damage health, with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer.

Road motor vehicles range from passenger vehicles to heavy commercial vehicles, including petrol and diesel vehicles. Vehicles for use in farm and construction are not included. While road motor vehicle travel predominantly involves petrol vehicles (approximately 73 percent of vehicle kilometres travelled), diesel vehicles (approximately 27 percent of vehicle kilometres travelled) contribute the majority of air pollutants from road motor vehicles – specifically particulate matter and nitrogen oxides (NIWA, 2015; Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, 2015).

This dataset relates to the "Road motor vehicle emissions" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52433
Data type Table
Row count 130
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM10 concentrations in towns and cities 2006–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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960
32
Added
02 Dec 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 02 Dec 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main human-made source of PM10.

PM10 is of particular concern because it is found in high concentrations in some areas and can damage health. It is associated with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Annual average PM10 concentrations in towns and cities" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52625
Data type Table
Row count 648
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Emissions from burning wood or coal for home heating 2006 and 2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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924
19
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

In 2013, 37 percent of homes burned wood and 4 percent burned coal for heating. Burning wood or coal for home heating emits a range of air pollutants. It is the main human-made source of particulate matter and a significant contributor of carbon monoxide. Exposure to these pollutants can damage health, with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to cancer.

The proportions of homes using wood or coal for heating vary around the country. Generally, the use of wood and coal for home heating is greater in the South Island than in the North Island. The West Coast has the highest proportion (72 percent use wood, 56 percent use coal), while in contrast Auckland has lower usage (23 percent use wood and 2 percent use coal). Burning wood or coal for home heating continues to be associated with air quality issues, including high levels of PM10, PM2.5, arsenic, and benzo(a)pyrene at some locations.

This dataset relates to the "Home-heating emissions" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52451
Data type Table
Row count 20
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM2.5 concentrations 2008–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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639
33
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

PM2.5 are particles 2.5 micrometres or less in diameter. PM2.5 is emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (eg from vehicles). Natural sources have less influence on PM2.5 concentrations than PM10 concentrations. This means PM2.5 comes mainly from human activities. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main source of PM2.5.

PM2.5 is a component of PM10 and is associated with similar health effects, ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. However, the smaller PM2.5 particles are more closely associated with severe health problems.

This dataset relates to the "PM2.5 concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52438
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Benzene concentrations 2012–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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646
10
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Benzene is a volatile organic compound. Motor vehicle use and home heating are the main sources of airborne benzene emissions. Natural sources include volcanoes and forest fires. Benzene can affect the nervous system and is associated with some forms of cancer.

Benzene is emitted by human-made (motor vehicles, burning wood or coal for home heating, and some industrial activities) and natural (volcanoes and forest fires) sources.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Benzene concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52429
Data type Table
Row count 16
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrogen dioxide concentrations and exceedances

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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590
20
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a gas. It can be emitted directly into the air but is most often formed when nitric oxide (NO) emissions react with other chemicals in the air. Nationally, road motor vehicles are the main human-made source of nitrogen oxides (NOx, the collective term for NO2 and NO). NO2 may cause respiratory infections and reduced lung development and functioning.

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitric oxide (NO) (collectively known as nitrogen oxides, NOx) are emitted from the combustion of fossil fuels and from natural sources such as volcanoes. The four main human-made sources of key pollutants in New Zealand are burning wood or coal for home heating, road motor vehicle use, industry, and household outdoor burning.

Column units:
- Disp_graph column: 1= displayed on graph; 0 = not displayed on graph
- Variable column: mg_m3 = micrograms per cubic metre (µg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Regional council and unitary authority monitoring of nitrogen dioxide" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52457
Data type Table
Row count 594
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Carbon monoxide concentrations and exceedances 2005–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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541
21
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas formed by incomplete combustion of fuels, in particular from road motor vehicles and burning wood and coal for home heating. It also occurs naturally, for example, from wild fires. CO can affect human health by interfering with the blood’s ability to carry oxygen and by aggravating heart conditions.

Road motor vehicles are the main source of carbon monoxide, followed closely by wood or coal burning for home heating. These two sources contribute 50 and 43 percent respectively of the combined carbon monoxide emissions produced by home heating, on-road vehicles and industry over a year.

Column units:
- Disp_graph column: 1= displayed on graph; 0 = not displayed on graph
- Variable column: mg_m3 = milligrams per cubic metre (mg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Carbon monoxide concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52447
Data type Table
Row count 504
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Seasonality of PM2.5 exceedances

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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580
10
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

PM2.5 are particles 2.5 micrometres or less in diameter. PM2.5 is emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (eg from vehicles). Natural sources have less influence on PM2.5 concentrations than PM10 concentrations. This means PM2.5 comes mainly from human activities. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main source of PM2.5.

PM2.5 is a component of PM10 and is associated with similar health effects, ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. However, the smaller PM2.5 particles are more closely associated with severe health problems.

This dataset relates to the "Seasonality of PM2.5 exceedances" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52435
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM10 concentrations by site 2006–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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516
29
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10) in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources. PM10 can be emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (from vehicles). Natural sources of PM10 include sea salt, dust, pollen, smoke (from bush fires), and volcanic ash. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main human-made source of PM10.

PM10 is of particular concern because it is found in high concentrations in some areas and can damage health. It is associated with effects ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)
- In_indicat = included in analyses (1= yes, 0 = no)

This dataset relates to the "PM10 annual average concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52437
Data type Table
Row count 616
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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