Fish licences issued by Fish and Game, 1980/81 to 2013/14 seasons

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2901
30
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Fresh water in New Zealand is highly valued for recreational activities, including fishing. Freshwater angling (primarily for introduced ‘sports fish’ such as brown trout, rainbow trout, and chinook salmon) is a popular leisure activity. Fish licences issued by Fish & Game New Zealand provide an indication of recreational fishing activity at freshwater locations around the country.

This dataset relates to the "Participation in recreational fishing" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52543
Data type Table
Row count 238
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lake water quality state percentiles, by monitoring site, 2009-2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2855
59
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

When nutrients accumulate in lakes (referred to as ‘nutrient enrichment’) above certain levels, they can make the lakes murky and green with algae, and lower oxygen levels. Lakes with extremely poor water quality are rarely suitable for recreation and provide poor habitats for aquatic species.

Percentile calculations for the following parameters are provided:
Trophic Level Index 3 (TLI)
Chlorophyll-a (CHLA)
Bottom-water dissolved oxygen (DObottom)
Ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4N)
Oxidised nitrogen (NO3N)
Total nitrogen (unfiltered) (TN)
Dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP)
Total phosphorus (unfiltered) (TP)

For more information please see:
Larned, S, Snelder, T, Unwin, M, McBride, G, Verburg, P, McMillan, H (2015).Analysis of Water Quality in New Zealand lakes and Rivers: data sources, data sets, assumptions, limitations, methods and results. NIWA Client Report no. CHC2015-033. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/DDui3u from the Ministry for the Environment dataservice.

This dataset relates to the "Lake water quality: Trophic Level Index" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52537
Data type Table
Row count 5632
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Melanoma registration rates, by age, 1996–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2902
9
Added
18 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Oct 2017.

This csv reports melanoma registration rates, per 100,000 population, by age. Age is grouped in 5 year segments (eg 0–4 years old, 5–9 years old).
New Zealand and Australia have the world’s highest rates of melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer. Melanoma is mainly caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, usually from the sun. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, especially during summer.
The risk of developing melanoma is affected by factors such as skin colour and type, family history, and the amount of sun exposure. Melanoma can affect people at any age, but the chance of developing a melanoma increases with age. We report on age-standardised rates of melanoma to account for the increasing proportion of older people in our population.
Our data on melanoma registrations come from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and the Ministry of Health's Mortality Collection. The passing of the Cancer Registry Act 1993 and Cancer Registry Regulations 1994 led to significant improvements in data quality and coverage (Ministry of Health, 2013). A sharp increase in registrations after 1993 is likely to have been related to these legislative and regulatory changes; for this reason we have only analysed data from 1996.
2014–15 data are provisional and subject to change.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89482
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Performance of assessed fish stock in relation to the overfishing threshold (2009–15)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2869
38
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

Our fish stocks are affected by commercial, customary, and recreational fishing, and environmental pressures (eg ocean temperature, acidity, and productivity). The Ministry for Primary Industries uses three performance measures to assess influences on fish stocks: a soft limit (below which a rebuilding plan is required), a hard limit (below which closing a fishery should be considered), and an overfishing threshold (where the rate of extraction is higher than the rate of replenishment).

Table ID 53468
Data type Table
Row count 14
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Time series for two coastal sea surface temperature monitoring stations (1953–2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2865
41
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Coastal sea-surface temperature is influenced by solar heating and cooling, latitude, and local geography. It is hard for some marine species to survive when the sea temperature changes. This can affect marine ecosystems and processes. It can also affect fish-farming industries based in our coastal areas.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52525
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions summary data, 1990–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2872
33
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions source and sink summary data by sector and gas for 1990-2015. Data are sourced from the 1990-2015 New Zealand Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89429
Data type Table
Row count 26
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Water physical stocks by region (1995–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2866
36
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

New Zealand is a water-rich country. Water is found in a network of waterways and lakes, as ground water, in glaciers, and in the soil and plants. Changes in temperature and precipitation patterns affect our water stocks, for example leading to low flows or floods. Water physical stocks show how climate changes can impact on our environment, its ecosystems, and ultimately our lifestyles.
Further information can be found in:
Collins, D, Zammit, C, Willsman, A & Henderson, R (2015) Surface water components of New Zealand’s National WaterAccounts, 1995-2014. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment May 2015. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Tebsax on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Water physical stocks: precipitation and evapotranspiration" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52578
Data type Table
Row count 3520
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Growing degree days monthly data by site, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2876
23
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Growing degree days (GDD) measures the amount of warmth available for plant and insect growth and can be used to predict when flowers will bloom and crops and insects will mature. GDD counts the total number of degrees Celsius each day is above a threshold temperature. In this report we used 10 degrees Celsius. Increased GDD means that plants and insects reach maturity faster, provided that other conditions necessary for growth are favourable, such as sufficient moisture and nutrients. As a measure of temperature, GDD experiences short-term changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño, and in the longer-term is affected by our warming climate.
This dataset gives the number of GDD per month and calendar year for all 30 sites.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89392
Data type Table
Row count 1290
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Use of Māori land, land use, 2006–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2872
15
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Land (whenua) is taonga tuku iho (cultural property, heritage) and of special importance to Māori. As the whakapūmautanga (legacy for the future), whenua provides for cultivation and storage of traditional foods and plants – for customary use and mahinga kai, and helps sustain each generation.

We report only on the available data we have, which cover a subset of Māori land used for primary production activities. The main land use types covered are grassland, forest plantation, bush and scrub, and horticulture.

Table ID 95351
Data type Table
Row count 990
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Extreme wind, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2837
44
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Extreme wind annual statistics for 30 regionally representative sites. The number of days with a maximum gust in the 99th percentile provides information on the frequency of extreme wind events. Percentiles are obtained from all available daily maximum wind gust data. On average, the 99th percentile daily maximum wind gust will be exceeded on approximately 3.6 days per year. Therefore, annual counts higher than this indicate more days than usual with very strong wind gusts recorded; annual counts lower than 3.6 indicate fewer strong wind gust days than usual. By using a percentile threshold we can identify events that are extreme for a particular location. Some places are naturally subject to stronger winds than others, so vegetation can become ‘wind-hardened’ and may have a higher tolerance to high wind gusts (eg a 100 km/hr wind gust may be damaging at one location, but not at another). Using a relative threshold accounts for these differences and better captures extreme wind gust occurrences. The highest maximum gust per year and the average annual highest maximum wind gust both provide information on the magnitude of extreme wind events.
Steady wind can be an important resource, but strong gusts can damage property, topple trees, and disrupt transportation, communications, and electricity. Extreme wind events can occur with frontal weather systems, around strong convective storms such as thunderstorms, and with ex-tropical cyclones. Projections indicate climate change may alter the occurrence of extreme wind events, with the strength of extreme winds expected to increase over the southern half of the North Island and the South Island, especially east of the Southern Alps, and decrease from Northland to Bay of Plenty. Monitoring can help us gauge the potential of, and prepare for, such events.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89425
Data type Table
Row count 1327
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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