Trends in peak UV index value, 1981–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6610
5
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Trends in daily peak UV index values at Invercargill, Lauder (Otago region), Christchurch, Paraparaumu (Wellington region), and Leigh (Auckland region). The strength of UV light is expressed as a solar UV index, starting from 0 (no UV) to 11+ (extreme).
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light helps our bodies make vitamin D, which we need for healthy bones and muscles. However, too much exposure to UV light can cause skin cancer. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, and monitoring UV levels helps us understand the occurrence of skin cancer.
Ozone in the upper atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s UV light, protecting us from harmful levels. The amount of UV radiation reaching the ground varies in relation to changes in the atmospheric ozone concentrations. The Antarctic ozone hole lies well to the south of New Zealand and does not have a large effect on New Zealand’s ozone concentrations.
The trend was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89469
Data type Table
Row count 5
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode trend assessment, 1860–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6584
13
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89385
Data type Table
Row count 7
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lake water quality state percentiles, by monitoring site, 2009-2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6512
60
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

When nutrients accumulate in lakes (referred to as ‘nutrient enrichment’) above certain levels, they can make the lakes murky and green with algae, and lower oxygen levels. Lakes with extremely poor water quality are rarely suitable for recreation and provide poor habitats for aquatic species.

Percentile calculations for the following parameters are provided:
Trophic Level Index 3 (TLI)
Chlorophyll-a (CHLA)
Bottom-water dissolved oxygen (DObottom)
Ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4N)
Oxidised nitrogen (NO3N)
Total nitrogen (unfiltered) (TN)
Dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP)
Total phosphorus (unfiltered) (TP)

For more information please see:
Larned, S, Snelder, T, Unwin, M, McBride, G, Verburg, P, McMillan, H (2015).Analysis of Water Quality in New Zealand lakes and Rivers: data sources, data sets, assumptions, limitations, methods and results. NIWA Client Report no. CHC2015-033. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/DDui3u from the Ministry for the Environment dataservice.

This dataset relates to the "Lake water quality: Trophic Level Index" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52537
Data type Table
Row count 5632
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Water quality parameters in coastal and estuarine environments (2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand

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6446
84
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Coastal and estuarine ecosystems are affected by changes in the levels of nutrients, oxygen, and light. An overload of nutrients can be toxic or lead to algal blooms. These blooms can kill marine life by depleting oxygen levels. Suspended sediment can smother habitats or reduce light levels, affecting photosynthesis. We report on five measures of water quality: turbidity (murkiness), dissolved oxygen, and the dissolved nutrients nitrate- and nitrite-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and total phosphorus.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal and estuarine water quality" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52508
Data type Table
Row count 1623
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Selected barriers to freshwater fish in Hawke’s Bay, 2002–10

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6489
11
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Many of New Zealand’s iconic freshwater fish species are diadromous, which means they need to migrate between fresh water and the ocean to complete their life cycles. Some man-made structures such as culverts, weirs, stormwater pump stations, tide gates, and dams can obstruct diadromous fish migrations and prevent fish from reaching critical habitats.

This can result in the gradual decline and loss of fish species from some rivers, and streams and lakes. Protecting the connection between upstream and downstream habitats of our indigenous fish is as important as protecting their habitats themselves.

We do not yet have enough data to provide a national picture on fish barriers, so we report on known barriers to freshwater fish passage in the Hawke’s Bay region from culverts, weirs, and stormwater pump stations.

Table ID 53607
Data type Table
Row count 80
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual glacier ice volumes trend, 1977–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6475
21
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A glacier is a body of slow-moving ice, at least 1 hectare in area that has persisted for two decades or longer. New Zealand has 3,144 glaciers. Most are located along the Southern Alps on the South Island, although Mount Ruapehu on the North Island supports 18 glaciers. New Zealand’s large glaciers are noteworthy for their large debris cover. The exceptions, Franz Joseph and Fox glaciers, are rare examples of glaciers that terminate in a rainforest.
Glacier volume is strongly influenced by climate factors, such as temperature and precipitation, which scientists expect to be affected by the warming climate. Glacial ice is an important water resource. Changes to ice storage and melting can affect ecological and hydropower resources downstream, as well as important cultural values and tourism.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89397
Data type Table
Row count 1
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ozone hole (1979–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6441
29
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone protects the Earth from harmful levels of UV radiation. The ozone hole is an area of reduced stratospheric ozone that forms over Antarctica each spring, due to ozone-depleting substance. Reporting on the state of the ozone hole provides important context for the state of ozone concentrations globally.
This dataset relates to the "Ozone hole" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52563
Data type Table
Row count 35
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Soil health and land use - Soil sites within target range for all indicators, by land use 2009-2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6438
17
Added
20 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 20 Apr 2017.

NEW FILE 21/04/2017
(See "Land domain updates" page for details; www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/environment/env...)

Different land uses put pressure on the land environment and can result in changes to soil health. Healthy soil supports the productivity of agriculture and forestry, and filters water to help prevent waterways becoming contaminated. Soils are considered healthy if they fall within the target ranges for the indicators of acidity, fertility, organic reserves, and physical status.

This dataset relates to the "Soil health and land use" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

For raw data see "2015 land aotearoa soil health data for release.xlsx" at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LTBnRL

Table ID 53595
Data type Table
Row count 4
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in groundwater quality, 2005–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6424
26
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Groundwater quality indicators include E.coli, nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Also included is data on pesticides, iron, manganese, electrical conductivity, and total dissolved solids. Information on sampling protocol, equipment, and method is provided.

Nitrogen occurs naturally in groundwater, but usually at very low concentrations. Agricultural and urban land use can add more nitrate-nitrogen to groundwater. If used for drinking water, high levels of nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes. Ammoniacal nitrogen is undesirable if groundwater is used for drinking, and elevated levels of nitrate and ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other animals. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. It can also be present naturally from interactions between groundwater and rocks. Too much phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E.coli in fresh water can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

This dataset relates to trends in four groundwater quality indicators: nitrate nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, and E.coli. throughout New Zealand over the 10-year period 2005–2014.

Table ID 53604
Data type Table
Row count 1683
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of marine mammals

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6424
25
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand has a diverse range of marine mammal species. Marine mammals are indicator species for the state of our marine environment. They are apex species (near the top of the food chain) and can thrive only if their ecosystems are healthy. A decreasing population can indicate that the ecosystem is degrading.
This dataset relates to the "Conservation status of marine mammals" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52510
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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