Stream bed sedimentation - predicted cover in all river reaches nationwide

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5475
50
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Fine sediment is the collective term for inorganic particles smaller than 2mm that are deposited on the beds of rivers and streams. Urban development, agriculture, and plantation forestry around waterways can increase the amount of sediment entering river systems. Sediment can clog the spaces between pebbles used by aquatic insects and fish, and degrade food sources and sites used for egg laying. Excessive sedimentation can also affect the suitability of rivers and streams for recreation.

Predictions of the proportion of deposited fine sediment cover are provided for every river reach in the River Environment Classification. These were calculated via a regression model using the measured proportion of fine sediment cover, slope of the river, climate and catchment land cover.

NZREACH = River location ID from the River Environment Classification
pred_obs = predicted contemporary percent fine sediment cover
pred_expec = predicted pre-human percent fine sediment cover

This dataset relates to the "Stream bed sedimentation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52540
Data type Table
Row count 576276
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Stream bed sedimentation - observed cover at fish monitoring sites

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5700
30
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Fine sediment is the collective term for inorganic particles smaller than 2mm that are deposited on the beds of rivers and streams. Urban development, agriculture, and plantation forestry around waterways can increase the amount of sediment entering river systems. Sediment can clog the spaces between pebbles used by aquatic insects and fish, and degrade food sources and sites used for egg laying. Excessive sedimentation can also affect the suitability of rivers and streams for recreation.

Stream bed sediment observations are visual estimates of the proportion of the river bed covered by fine sediment. This information was collected during fish surveys, and stored in the Freshwater Fish database managed by NIWA. Observed in-stream sediment values for 10,025 sites are provided, dating from 1990 to 2011 in order to represent contemporary cover. The exception to this date range is the Fiordland area where all available information (1970 to 2011) was used to fill a representation gap.

This dataset relates to the "Stream bed sedimentation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52539
Data type Table
Row count 40928
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Status of widespread indigenous trees - Widespread indigenous tree species, 2002–07 and 2009–14

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5345
22
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Eight indigenous tree species, spanning a range of ecological niches, were surveyed twice (between 2002 and 2014) as part of a vegetation monitoring programme. The data from these surveys can be used to assess changes in tree populations. Monitoring the status and trends of these widespread tree species helps us detect large-scale, long-term changes and problems for our forest ecosystems. Surveys assess the average number of trees per hectare.

This dataset relates to the "Status of widespread indigenous trees" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52474
Data type Table
Row count 8
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Status of widespread indigenous trees - Difference between recruitment and mortality, for eight widespread indigenous tree species, 2002–07 and 2009–14

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5173
7
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Eight indigenous tree species, spanning a range of ecological niches, were surveyed twice (between 2002 and 2014) as part of a vegetation monitoring programme. The data from these surveys can be used to assess changes in tree populations. Monitoring the status and trends of these widespread tree species helps us detect large-scale, long-term changes and problems for our forest ecosystems.

This dataset relates to the "Status of widespread indigenous trees" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52473
Data type Table
Row count 3
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Spring rainfall trends, 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5361
11
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Spring rainfall trends for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89403
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode trend assessment, 1860–2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6896
13
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89385
Data type Table
Row count 7
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode monthly values, January 1979–December 2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6554
25
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89384
Data type Table
Row count 456
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode annual values, 1887–2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6433
33
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89383
Data type Table
Row count 168
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern annular mode (1887–2014)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6717
31
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is an index that describes climate variation around the South Pole and Antarctica, as far north as New Zealand. It indicates short-term climate variations that can influence New Zealand’s climate. Such climate variations can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities.
The variation is caused by the movement of a low-pressure belt that generates westerly winds. During a negative phase, the low pressure belt moves north, towards the equator. In New Zealand, this can cause increased westerly winds, unsettled weather, and storm activity over most of the country. Over the southern oceans, there are relatively less westerly winds and less storm activity.
During a positive phase, the low pressure belt moves south towards Antarctica. In New Zealand, this can cause relatively light winds and more settled weather. Over the southern oceans, there is increased westerly winds and storm activity.
This dataset relates to the "Southern annular mode" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52592
Data type Table
Row count 128
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Soil quality, state, 1996 - 2018

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1018
11
Updated
14 Apr 2021

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 14 Apr 2021.

DATA SOURCE: Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research; regional and district councils

[Technical report available at environment.govt.nz/publications/soil-quality-data... and environment.govt.nz/publications/soil-quality-and-...]

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Soil quality and land use" indicator [available at www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/soil-quality-and-land...]

We report on seven soil properties from 1996 to 2018: pH (a measure of acidity), Olsen phosphorus (a measure of fertility), total carbon, total nitrogen, and anaerobically mineralisable nitrogen (measures of organic reserves), and macroporosity and bulk density (measures of physical status). These are assessed across nine land uses. We report the proportion of sites above, below, and within soil quality target ranges for each of the seven soil quality indicators by land use, as well as by soil order.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf. Technical report links for this dataset are environment.govt.nz/publications/soil-quality-data... and environment.govt.nz/publications/soil-quality-and-...

Table ID 105416
Data type Table
Row count 26534
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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