Ozone concentrations 1996–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5570
24
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Ozone occurs in two regions of Earth’s atmosphere – at ground level and in the upper atmosphere. Ground-level ozone is a gas formed by chemical reactions involving sunlight, volatile organic compounds, and nitrogen oxides (the main source being vehicle emissions). It is linked to increased health risks, such as respiratory and cardiovascular diseases.

Given the time required for the chemical reactions that form ozone to take place, high concentrations of it occur well away and downwind from where the pollutants are initially emitted.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Ground-level ozone concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52450
Data type Table
Row count 54
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Oceanic sea surface temperature, 1993–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6328
56
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

We used NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive, which is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately six-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom & Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.
Our data extends from about 30°S to 55°S, and from 160°E to 170°W and is grouped into five areas: the exclusive economic zone (EEZ), the Chatham Rise, northern subtropical waters, subantarctic waters, and the Tasman Sea.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89406
Data type Table
Row count 960
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Oceanic sea surface temperature trends, 1993–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6706
11
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

We used NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive, which is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately six-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom & Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.
Our data extends from about 30°S to 55°S, and from 160°E to 170°W and is grouped into five areas: the exclusive economic zone (EEZ), the Chatham Rise, northern subtropical waters, subantarctic waters, and the Tasman Sea.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89407
Data type Table
Row count 4
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Oceanic sea surface temperature anomaly

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6764
27
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Sea surface temperature changes with climate drivers such as El Niño, and will change with climate change. The sea surface temperature anomaly provides an indication of the heat change in the ocean.
Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.
The oceanic sea surface temperature data comes from the NIWA Sea surface temperature Archive (NSA). There are 2 datasets, of NSA Annual means and NSA Annual Anomolies, covering the Tasman, subtropical (STW) and Southern Antarctic (SAW) area and the total area. The data is available from 1993 to 2013 and the unit of measure is degrees celcius.
For further information please see:
Uddstrom, MJ (2015) Sea Surface Temperature Data and Analysis for the 2015 Synthesis Report. For Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/hRbGUJ on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz).
This dataset relates to the "Sea surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52582
Data type Table
Row count 84
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Oceanic extreme waves (2008–15)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5619
11
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Extreme wave indexes estimate the occurrence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters. Extreme wave indexes estimate the number of times a significant wave height exceeds one of three threshold values for at least 12 hours in 24 marine regions. The three wave-height thresholds are four metres, six metres, and eight metres.
This indicator estimates the exceedances of wave-height thresholds for each year from 2008 to 2015 in oceanic areas around New Zealand.
Significant wave height is a measure of the ‘typical’ wave height in a place over a time period. It is four times the standard deviation of the water surface if, for example, you were to measure water moving up and down a jetty piling for an hour. The largest individual wave will typically have a height around twice the significant wave height.
We use three wave-height thresholds because of the regional variation in extreme wave events. In general, the north experiences less exposure to consistently strong winds, and the waves generated by them, than the south. Four-metre tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts of New Zealand but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.

Table ID 53477
Data type Table
Row count 18
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Oceanic and coastal primary productivity 1998 - 2017

1407
6
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

This indicator measures the amount of phytoplankton in ocean water around New Zealand using satellite data. Phytoplankton are microscopic algae and primary producers, meaning they enable those higher up the food web to survive. Phytoplankton growth is affected by the availability of nutrients and light, which in turn are affected by the structure of the upper water column. Large-scale changes to climate and oceanographic conditions can change the water column structure and thus lead to changes in phytoplankton growth and primary productivity. Phytoplankton growth supports marine organisms throughout the marine environment, including fish, mammals, and seabirds (Pinkerton et al, 2019). We monitor the changes in phytoplankton by measuring chl-a concentration to provide an understanding of how marine ecosystems are changing. This affects the services we rely on for economic, cultural, and recreational purposes, such as fisheries (Nixon & Buckley, 2002).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104058
Data type Table
Row count 10680
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ocean storms (1979–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5434
21
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

The ocean storm index estimates the number of days in a year when wind speeds exceed gale and storm force on the Beaufort Scale. In a gale, sea conditions are rough and waves can be over six metres high. In a storm, waves can be over 10 metres high. To put this into context, on land a near gale would make walking difficult, and a storm would cause some damage to roofs, chimneys, and trees. Climate change could lead to changes in the frequency and intensity of storms. More frequent and intense storms will likely be a stressor for habitats and species.
The ocean storm index estimates the number of days that wind speeds exceed gale and storm force on the Beaufort Scale. The Beaufort Scale is a widely used international classification that rates sea conditions from 0 (calm) to 12 (hurricane). We report on estimated wind speeds broken down to:
- gales – measure 8 on the scale, have rough sea conditions with wind speeds of approximately 62–74 km per hour and wave heights of 5.5 metres
- storms – measure 10 on the scale, have wind speeds of approximately 89–102 km per hour and wave heights of 9–11.5 metres (McDonald & Parsons, 2016)

Table ID 53465
Data type Table
Row count 74
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ocean acidification, 1998–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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8589
76
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

The pH of New Zealand subantarctic waters is calculated from pCO2 (dissolved carbon dioxide) and alkalinity measurements using refitted Mehrbach constants (see Mehrbach et al, 1973; Dickson & Millero, 1987), and in-situ temperature taken from the Munida time-series transect off the Otago coast. Measurements of pCO2 are taken every two months.
The Munida transect, in the subantarctic waters off Otago, is the Southern Hemisphere’s longest-running record of pH measurements (NIWA, 2015).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89461
Data type Table
Row count 660
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ocean acidification state 1998 - 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1719
10
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

Ocean acidification is the long-term decrease in the pH of our coastal waters and oceans. This indicator measures the change in pH in subantarctic surface waters at a station east of Otago from 1998 to 2017, and also the pH at selected coastal sites via the New Zealand Ocean Acidification Observing Network (NZOA-ON) from 2015 to 2017.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104052
Data type Table
Row count 6526
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of warm days (above 25⁰ C) for selected sites (1975–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5440
24
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The number of frost and hot days we experience each year can change in response to many climate factors, such as the warming pattern induced by El Niño. These numbers indicate the variations in our climate and are an important consideration in agriculture. They also affect our behaviour, for example, what we do to keep safe on icy roads or whether to use air conditioning to keep cool.
further information can be found in:
Tait, A, Macara, G, & Paul, V. (2014) Preparation of climate datasets for the 2015 Environmental Synthesis Report: Temperature, Rainfall, Wind, Sunshine and Soil Moisture. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Fwn9AL on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Frost and hot days" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52576
Data type Table
Row count 12194
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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