Primary use and source of consented freshwater takes, 2013–14

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5669
109
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Regional councils issue resource consents for the taking of fresh water for various purposes, including irrigation, drinking, hydroelectricity, and industry. Water can be taken from surface water or groundwater.

The file provides the primary source and primary use of the water take for each consented take.

Table ID 53613
Data type Table
Row count 16154
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Primary productivity - chlorophyll-a anomalies (1997–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5537
24
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Phytoplankton are primary producers and form the basis of the oceans’ food chains. They contain the pigment chlorophyll-a (chl-a), which they use to create their own food through photosynthesis. We study concentrations of chl-a in phytoplankton to assess primary productivity in our oceans. Changes in productivity are likely to affect food chains and ultimately affect marine biodiversity, including the species we rely on for economic, cultural, or recreational purposes.
This dataset relates to the "Primary productivity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52520
Data type Table
Row count 2080
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Predicted river water quality, 2009–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6355
134
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

River water quality is valued for many reasons including ecological function and habitat, recreational value, its role in supporting people and industry, and its cultural significance. Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus are essential for plant growth, however too much in rivers can lead to excessive growth of river algae, which can degrade habitat.

High concentrations of nitrogen in the form of ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrate-nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other aquatic animals, and nitrate-nitrogen can be toxic to humans. Water clarity is a measure of underwater visibility, and affects habitat of aquatic life such as fish and birds, and can also impact on aesthetic values and recreational use of rivers and streams. Escherichia coli (E.coli) can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces, which can cause illness.

File contains the model outputs for river water quality indicators as medians for each river segment in New Zealand’s digital river network.

Table ID 53601
Data type Table
Row count 593444
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Predicted reference and current streambed deposited fine sediment 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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418
17
Added
13 Aug 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Aug 2019.

This dataset reports modelled reference and current state of streambed deposited fine sediment at the REC1 stream segment scale. It provides predicted reference state from a boosted regression tree model trained on 1.) reference site data defined by land cover rules, 2.) all available deposited sediment. It also shows predicted current state trained on all available deposited sediment data.

See Clapcott & Goodwin (2017) for further information on the relevant model rules and data inputs.

Table ID 103685
Data type Table
Row count 576273
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W)

Predicted E.coli concentrations in rivers, 1990–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4713
28
Added
24 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Apr 2017.

River water quality is valued for many reasons including recreational value.
Escherichia coli (E.coli) can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces, which can cause illness.

File contains the model outputs for E.coli concentrations as four different statistics for each river segment in New Zealand’s digital river network.

Table ID 53603
Data type Table
Row count 570577
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Predicted capture of 11 fish species, 1977–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5025
55
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Freshwater fish are an important component of freshwater ecosystems, have intrinsic biodiversity values and are a valued resource for Māori, recreational and commercial fishers. The presence of fish species can be affected by changes in catchment land cover and land use, in-stream habitat, fish passages (routes for moving up and down waterways), pests, and contaminants.

File contains predicted capture, including upper and lower confidence intervals for 11 fish species, including indices of native fish, exotic fish, and all fish, over the period 1977 ̶ 2015.

Table ID 53608
Data type Table
Row count 39
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED), 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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7165
41
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Interpolated PED values at 30 regionally representative sites.
Soil moisture is vital for plant growth. When plants cannot access the water they need, growth is reduced, affecting crops and food for livestock, and native biodiversity. Over a sustained period, a drought can have significant social and economic costs, particularly for rural communities.
Potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED) can be thought of as a drought index. It is the difference between how much water could potentially be lost from the soil through evapotranspiration and how much is actually available. When PED is high, plants do not have the full amount of water available they need for growth. PED is measured in growing seasons (the 12 months from 1 July to 30 June of the following year. Data covers each of the growing seasons from 1 July 1972, with the last growing season in the series ending on 30 June 2016. More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89437
Data type Table
Row count 1320
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM2.5 exceedances 2008–13

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5501
18
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

PM2.5 are particles 2.5 micrometres or less in diameter. PM2.5 is emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (eg from vehicles). Natural sources have less influence on PM2.5 concentrations than PM10 concentrations. This means PM2.5 comes mainly from human activities. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main source of PM2.5.

PM2.5 is a component of PM10 and is associated with similar health effects, ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. However, the smaller PM2.5 particles are more closely associated with severe health problems.

Column headings:
- No_exceed - Number of exceedances
- Disp_graph - Displayed on graph (1= yes, 0 = no)

This dataset relates to the "PM2.5 concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52439
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM2.5 concentrations, 2008–17

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4338
60
Added
15 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2018.

PM2.5 is made up of solid and liquid particles in the air with a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometres. In New Zealand, most PM2.5 in the air results from combustion (burning wood for home heating, motor-vehicle exhaust), and to a lesser extent, particles formed from reactions in the atmosphere (secondary PM) and naturally occurring sea salt.
Short- and long-term exposure to PM2.5, even at low levels, is linked to respiratory and cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of premature death, especially in vulnerable people (the young, the elderly, and people with respiratory illness). Emerging evidence points to possible links with cognitive function, neuro-development, and diabetes.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98413
Data type Table
Row count 33750
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM2.5 concentrations 2008–13

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4887
52
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

PM2.5 are particles 2.5 micrometres or less in diameter. PM2.5 is emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (eg from vehicles). Natural sources have less influence on PM2.5 concentrations than PM10 concentrations. This means PM2.5 comes mainly from human activities. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main source of PM2.5.

PM2.5 is a component of PM10 and is associated with similar health effects, ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. However, the smaller PM2.5 particles are more closely associated with severe health problems.

This dataset relates to the "PM2.5 concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52438
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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