Conservation status of indigenous species 2018

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30
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16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

Many of New Zealand’s indigenous plants and animals are endemic – found nowhere else in the world – and are our national taonga (treasure). New Zealand species make a significant contribution to global biodiversity, which is important for ecosystem processes and resilience, mahinga kai (traditional food gathering), and culture and recreation.

Conservation status is a representation of the threat classification of resident indigenous plant and animal species. The Department of Conservation (DOC) developed the New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS) to provide a national system that is similar to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Red List.

We report on four conservation status categories: threatened, at risk, not threatened, and data deficient. Conservation status categories ‘threatened’ and ‘at risk’ are divided into subcategories that provide more information on the species’ threat of extinction classification (adapted from Townsend et al, 2008). Species are classified as ‘data deficient’ if we lack information on the species, making threat classification assessment not possible.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99875
Data type Table
Row count 10667
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of marine mammals

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3872
15
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand has a diverse range of marine mammal species. Marine mammals are indicator species for the state of our marine environment. They are apex species (near the top of the food chain) and can thrive only if their ecosystems are healthy. A decreasing population can indicate that the ecosystem is degrading.
This dataset relates to the "Conservation status of marine mammals" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52510
Data type Table
Row count 30
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Conservation status of marine mammals

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3477
26
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

New Zealand has a diverse range of marine mammal species and subspecies, including whales, dolphins, seals, and sea lions. Marine mammals are indicator species for the state of our marine environment. The conservation status of a species relates to its risk of extinction.
Many of these species are endemic (only found in) to New Zealand. They are apex species (near the top of the food chain) and can thrive only if their ecosystems are healthy. A decreasing population can indicate that the ecosystem is degrading. Marine mammals played an important part in New Zealand history; in the past whales and seals were hunted in great numbers. Now we have a rapidly-growing whale- and dolphin-watching industry.

Table ID 53481
Data type Table
Row count 29
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Conservation status of native freshwater fish and invertebrates, 2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4347
49
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

New Zealand has a diverse range of freshwater species. Many of these species are endemic to (only occur in, or only breed in) New Zealand. Freshwater fish and invertebrates are indicator species for the state of our freshwater environment. A decreasing population can indicate that the ecosystem is degrading.

This measure reports on the conservation status of New Zealand's indigenous freshwater fish and invertebrate species, including the number of species that have had a genuine change in conservation status between two monitoring periods (2009–13 and 2005–13). A change in a species’ conservation status reflects a change in its risk of extinction.

Table ID 53612
Data type Table
Row count 723
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of seabird species and subspecies (2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4101
30
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28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand has 92 seabird and 14 shorebird species and subspecies (taxa). We have the highest number of endemic seabirds (found only in a particular area) in the world. Nearly 25 percent of the world’s seabird species breed in the New Zealand region, and almost 10 percent only breed here. Seabirds and shorebirds tend to be at or near the top of the food chain, and thrive only if the marine ecosystem is healthy. Decreasing bird populations can signal that the ecosystem is degrading.
This dataset relates to the "Conservation status of seabirds and shorebirds" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52511
Data type Table
Row count 92
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of shorebird species and subspecies (2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3662
9
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand has 92 seabird and 14 shorebird species and subspecies (taxa). Seabirds and shorebirds tend to be at or near the top of the food chain, and thrive only if the marine ecosystem is healthy. Decreasing bird populations can signal that the ecosystem is degrading.
This dataset relates to the "Conservation status of seabirds and shorebirds" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52513
Data type Table
Row count 20
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Contribution of industry to key pollutants

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3572
18
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Industrial activities emit a range of pollutants that affect our air quality. The health effects associated with exposure to these pollutants range from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. Nationally, industrial activities are the main human-made source of sulphur dioxide emissions.

This dataset relates to the "Industrial emissions" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Further information can be found in Environet and Golders Associates (2015). Home heating emission inventory and other sources evaluation. Wellington: Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/a5FAw6 on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice.

Table ID 52452
Data type Table
Row count 20
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Contribution to PM10 – Selected Locations

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3481
10
Added
01 Dec 2014

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Dec 2014.

Note: PM10 concentrations are given in micrograms per cubic metre of air, or µg/m3.

Source: Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences. Regional councils of Wellington,
Hawke's Bay; Nelson City Council; Marlborough District Council, Otago; Auckland Council

Table ID 52130
Data type Table
Row count 14
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Cultural Health Index scores for waterways, 2005–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3605
24
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Cultural Health Index scores for a waterway is a combination measure of historical cultural use and access, mahinga kai assessment, and water quality assessment from a cultural perspective of a site on a waterway.

The Cultural Health Index scores compile this information into a classification system to provide an overall grading of the state of a site and how the state of a site on a waterway affects the mauri, the ability for tangata whenua to feed the hapu and iwi and the overall water quality for the site. These are all important indicators of the cultural health of a waterway, and are also a consideration for other cultural and recreational activities like karakia, cleansing, swimming and wading.

Table ID 53617
Data type Table
Row count 42
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Cumulative occupancy of key non-indigenous species by port of first entry (2009–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3564
7
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Marine non-indigenous (exotic) species arrive in New Zealand waters on the hulls of international vessels (biofouling) or in discharged ballast waters. Some have little impact or cannot survive in New Zealand waters; others have a negative impact on our native habitats and species and become pests. They can compete with, and prey on, indigenous species, modify natural habitats, affect marine industries or can alter ecosystem processes. The potential impact of non-indigenous species on our native habitats and species means they could threaten our cultural and natural heritage, as well as economic activities such as commercial and recreational fishing, shellfish harvesting, and aquaculture.

Table ID 53493
Data type Table
Row count 77
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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