Annual glacier ice volumes trend, 1977–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3581
18
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A glacier is a body of slow-moving ice, at least 1 hectare in area that has persisted for two decades or longer. New Zealand has 3,144 glaciers. Most are located along the Southern Alps on the South Island, although Mount Ruapehu on the North Island supports 18 glaciers. New Zealand’s large glaciers are noteworthy for their large debris cover. The exceptions, Franz Joseph and Fox glaciers, are rare examples of glaciers that terminate in a rainforest.
Glacier volume is strongly influenced by climate factors, such as temperature and precipitation, which scientists expect to be affected by the warming climate. Glacial ice is an important water resource. Changes to ice storage and melting can affect ecological and hydropower resources downstream, as well as important cultural values and tourism.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89397
Data type Table
Row count 1
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Growing degree days annual growing season averages and totals, 1972/3–2015/6

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4110
20
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Growing degree days (GDD) measures the amount of warmth available for plant and insect growth and can be used to predict when flowers will bloom and crops and insects will mature. GDD counts the total number of degrees Celsius each day is above a threshold temperature. In this report we used 10 degrees Celsius. Increased GDD means that plants and insects reach maturity faster, provided that other conditions necessary for growth are favourable, such as sufficient moisture and nutrients. As a measure of temperature, GDD experiences short-term changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño, and in the longer-term is affected by our warming climate.
This dataset gives the average number of GDD over growing seasons (July 1 – June 30 of the following year) for New Zealand, the North and South Islands, and for all 30 sites.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89393
Data type Table
Row count 1389
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Growing degree days monthly data by site, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3666
30
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Growing degree days (GDD) measures the amount of warmth available for plant and insect growth and can be used to predict when flowers will bloom and crops and insects will mature. GDD counts the total number of degrees Celsius each day is above a threshold temperature. In this report we used 10 degrees Celsius. Increased GDD means that plants and insects reach maturity faster, provided that other conditions necessary for growth are favourable, such as sufficient moisture and nutrients. As a measure of temperature, GDD experiences short-term changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño, and in the longer-term is affected by our warming climate.
This dataset gives the number of GDD per month and calendar year for all 30 sites.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89392
Data type Table
Row count 1290
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Frost and warm days trend assessment, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3423
14
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The number of frost and warm days changes from year to year in response to climate variation, such as the warming pattern induced by El Niño. Climate models project we may experience fewer cold and more warm extremes in the future. Changes in the number of frost and warm days can affect agriculture, recreation, and our behaviour, for example, what we do to keep safe on icy roads or whether to use air conditioning to keep cool.
A frost day is when the minimum temperature recorded is below 0 degrees Celsius. It refers to a temperature measured in an instrument screen 1.2m above the ground rather than a ‘ground frost’. We define a warm day as having a maximum recorded temperature above 25 degrees Celsius. The threshold of 25 degrees Celsius is chosen to represent days where action might be taken to keep cool (eg turn air conditioning on).
This dataset gives the trend in frost and warm days for New Zealand, the North and South Islands, and for all 30 sites.
For frost days we have used calendar years. For warm days we have used growing season (July 1 – June 30 of the following year).
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89388
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Frost and warm days, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2826
19
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The number of frost and warm days changes from year to year in response to climate variation, such as the warming pattern induced by El Niño. Climate models project we may experience fewer cold and more warm extremes in the future. Changes in the number of frost and warm days can affect agriculture, recreation, and our behaviour, for example, what we do to keep safe on icy roads or whether to use air conditioning to keep cool.
A frost day is when the minimum temperature recorded is below 0 degrees Celsius. It refers to a temperature measured in an instrument screen 1.2 m above the ground rather than a ‘ground frost’. We define a warm day as having a maximum recorded temperature above 25 degrees Celsius. The threshold of 25 degrees Celsius is chosen to represent days where action might be taken to keep cool (eg turn air conditioning on).
This dataset gives the number of frost and warm days per month and calendar year for New Zealand, the North and South Islands, and all 30 sites.
For frost days we have used calendar years. For warm days we have used growing season (July 1 – June 30 of the following year).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89387
Data type Table
Row count 32667
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Campylobacteriosis, cryptosporidiosis, and salmonellosis notifications, 1997–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2803
3
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Bacteria and parasites are influenced by climate variables, and infection rates may increase in response to climate change and rising temperatures. Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, and Salmonella are three such organisms that can contaminate our food and water, leading to serious illness. Monitoring the incidence rates of illnesses can help us assess the health risks related to climate change and better prepare for disease outbreaks.
The numbers of notified cases of infection are sourced from EpiSurv, New Zealand’s national notifiable disease surveillance system. Various factors influence disease notification, and therefore the calculation of notifiable disease rates. For example, people are less likely to consult a medical practitioner when an illness is not severe (ESR, 2016a). The number of notified cases vary greatly from year to year due to New Zealand’s small population and low number of cases for some diseases (Environmental Science and Research, 2016). The August 2016 Camplylobacter outbreak in Havelock provides an example of this variation (ESR, 2016b).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89386
Data type Table
Row count 816
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode trend assessment, 1860–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3615
11
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89385
Data type Table
Row count 7
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode monthly values, January 1979–December 2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3448
19
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89384
Data type Table
Row count 456
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode annual values, 1887–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3501
24
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89383
Data type Table
Row count 168
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation, 1871–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3816
50
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) is a long-term oscillation of sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean that can last from 20 to 30 years. Its positive and negative phases affect the strength and frequency of El Niño and La Niña. In New Zealand, the positive phase is linked to stronger west to southwest winds and more rain in the west. This trend is reversed during the negative phase.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89382
Data type Table
Row count 730
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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