PM2.5 exceedances 2008–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6326
19
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

PM2.5 are particles 2.5 micrometres or less in diameter. PM2.5 is emitted from the combustion of fuels, such as wood and coal (eg from home heating and industry), and petrol and diesel (eg from vehicles). Natural sources have less influence on PM2.5 concentrations than PM10 concentrations. This means PM2.5 comes mainly from human activities. Nationally, burning wood or coal for home heating is the main source of PM2.5.

PM2.5 is a component of PM10 and is associated with similar health effects, ranging from respiratory irritation to some forms of cancer. However, the smaller PM2.5 particles are more closely associated with severe health problems.

Column headings:
- No_exceed - Number of exceedances
- Disp_graph - Displayed on graph (1= yes, 0 = no)

This dataset relates to the "PM2.5 concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52439
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Soil health and land use - Soil sites within target range for given soil health indicators, by land use, 2009-13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6273
44
Updated
21 Apr 2017

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 21 Apr 2017.

UPDATED 21/04/2017
(See "Land domain updates" page for details; www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/environment/env...)

Different land uses put pressure on the land environment and can result in changes to soil health. Healthy soil supports the productivity of agriculture and forestry, and filters water to help prevent waterways becoming contaminated. Soils are considered healthy if they fall within the target ranges for the indicators of acidity, fertility, organic reserves, and physical status.

This dataset relates to the "Soil health and land use" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

For raw data see "2015 land aotearoa soil health data for release.xlsx" at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LTBnRL

Table ID 52495
Data type Table
Row count 16
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Contribution to PM10 – Selected Locations

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6270
10
Added
01 Dec 2014

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Dec 2014.

Note: PM10 concentrations are given in micrograms per cubic metre of air, or µg/m3.

Source: Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences. Regional councils of Wellington,
Hawke's Bay; Nelson City Council; Marlborough District Council, Otago; Auckland Council

Table ID 52130
Data type Table
Row count 14
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bird species on public conservation land, estimated abundance 2013–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6244
31
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The status of our bird communities is an important indicator of the condition of our ecosystems. Many indigenous birds play key ecological roles, including dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers. In some situations, exotic bird species (not indigenous to New Zealand) can partially fulfil these roles. A reduction in the distribution and/or decline in numbers for common and widespread species can equate to large losses of individuals and ecosystem integrity. By measuring the composition of bird communities across public conservation land (forest and non-forest sites) we can monitor how they change over time.

This measure reports on the estimated abundance of seven common bird species on public conservation land, 2013–2016.Common species are species having occupancy over half of public conservation land.

Table ID 95337
Data type Table
Row count 56
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Cumulative occupancy of key non-indigenous species by species (2009–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6253
17
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Marine non-indigenous (exotic) species arrive in New Zealand waters on the hulls of international vessels (biofouling) or in discharged ballast waters. Some have little impact or cannot survive in New Zealand waters; others have a negative impact on our native habitats and species and become pests. They can compete with, and prey on, indigenous species, modify natural habitats, affect marine industries or can alter ecosystem processes. The potential impact of non-indigenous species on our native habitats and species means they could threaten our cultural and natural heritage, as well as economic activities such as commercial and recreational fishing, shellfish harvesting, and aquaculture.

Table ID 53492
Data type Table
Row count 56
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Rare ecosystems - Threat status of rare ecosystems, by ecosystem class, 2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6197
65
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Rare ecosystems are ecosystems that either naturally cover very small areas or have very little of their original extent remaining. The extent to which they are threatened with extinction informs their conservation priority.

Column headings:
no_ecosys = number of rare ecosystems

This dataset relates to the "Rare ecosystems" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52486
Data type Table
Row count 71
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ozone, Lauder, assimilated series (1978-2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6252
5
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone (O3) is a gas that is of interest in two regions of Earth’s atmosphere – at ground level and in the upper atmosphere (stratosphere). Stratospheric ozone absorbs ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun and protects Earth from harmful levels of UV. Exposure to these UV rays has been linked to skin cancer. Monitoring variations in stratospheric ozone concentrations is important in New Zealand as we have high rates of skin cancers.
Ozone data for Lauder have been supplied in two forms: Measurements taken with Dobson spectrophotometer (number 72) and data assimilated from satellite measurements recalibrated against the global Dobson network. The Dobson spectrophotometer has been in operation at Lauder since January 1987. The timeseries for interpolated satellite data is available from 1978. Both timeseries are provided until 2013.
This dataset is the assimilated dataset which is available from 1978 to 2013. Measurements are in Dobson units (DU). One DU represents the amount of ozone molecules needed to produce a 0.01mm layer of pure ozone.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Ozone concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52560
Data type Table
Row count 36
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Extreme wind, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6170
78
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Extreme wind annual statistics for 30 regionally representative sites. The number of days with a maximum gust in the 99th percentile provides information on the frequency of extreme wind events. Percentiles are obtained from all available daily maximum wind gust data. On average, the 99th percentile daily maximum wind gust will be exceeded on approximately 3.6 days per year. Therefore, annual counts higher than this indicate more days than usual with very strong wind gusts recorded; annual counts lower than 3.6 indicate fewer strong wind gust days than usual. By using a percentile threshold we can identify events that are extreme for a particular location. Some places are naturally subject to stronger winds than others, so vegetation can become ‘wind-hardened’ and may have a higher tolerance to high wind gusts (eg a 100 km/hr wind gust may be damaging at one location, but not at another). Using a relative threshold accounts for these differences and better captures extreme wind gust occurrences. The highest maximum gust per year and the average annual highest maximum wind gust both provide information on the magnitude of extreme wind events.
Steady wind can be an important resource, but strong gusts can damage property, topple trees, and disrupt transportation, communications, and electricity. Extreme wind events can occur with frontal weather systems, around strong convective storms such as thunderstorms, and with ex-tropical cyclones. Projections indicate climate change may alter the occurrence of extreme wind events, with the strength of extreme winds expected to increase over the southern half of the North Island and the South Island, especially east of the Southern Alps, and decrease from Northland to Bay of Plenty. Monitoring can help us gauge the potential of, and prepare for, such events.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89425
Data type Table
Row count 1327
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Seabird fishing-related mortality by conservation status (2006/7 to 2012/13)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6237
7
Added
21 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 21 Oct 2016.

Along with sea lions, fur seals, and dolphins, seabirds are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters (exclusive economic zone and territorial sea). Estimating seabird deaths from bycatch in commercial fishing is one way of assessing the pressure some seabird species face from current fishing practices. About one-third of our 92 resident seabird species and subspecies are considered to be threatened with extinction.
The fishing-related mortality category is derived from a semi-quantitative risk assessment conducted by Richard and Abraham (2015). We are using the threat rating assigned by Richard and Abraham (2015) for Our Marine Environment 2016. The Environment Aotearoa 2015 report used the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) risk rating. This results in a change to risk rating for one threatened species, which has a medium rating in the report but a high rating from MPI. This species is the Stewart Island shag, Leucocarbo chalconotus.

Table ID 53506
Data type Table
Row count 113
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily peak UV index values, Invercargill, Leigh, Lauder, Paraparaumu and Christchurch (1981–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6219
23
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause skin cancer. Ozone absorbs some UV radiation, and UV levels can vary in relation to changes in atmospheric ozone. Monitoring UV levels can help us understand current skin cancer risk.
The Lauder spectroradiometer (UVM dataset) data are used to assure the reliability of broad-band erythermal UV (RB dataset) from five sites. Measurements supplied are daily peak, noon-time mean, and total daily dose of erythemal (skin-reddening) UV.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "UV intensity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52584
Data type Table
Row count 60760
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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