Estimated annual Salvin's albatross captures in trawl and longline fisheries by fishery type (2003–14)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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92
4
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Along with sea lions, fur seals, and dolphins, seabirds are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters (exclusive economic zone and territorial sea). Estimating seabird deaths from bycatch in commercial fishing is one way of assessing the pressure some seabird species face from current fishing practices. About one-third of our 92 resident seabird species and subspecies are considered to be threatened with extinction. We report on the risk of death from commercial fishing for 70 seabird species and subspecies.
The estimated annual seabird bycatch in trawl and longline fisheries is reported for Salvin’s albatross to illustrate effects on a threatened bird species with a very high risk of fishing-related death.
This data has been significantly revised since that reported in Environment Aotearoa 2015, with the estimated total bycatch of seabirds increasing by nearly 1400 birds (30 %) on average across the comparable years 2002/3 – 2012/13. This revision is due to an updated and more unified modelling approach being applied by the data providers. For further information about this revision please see our Marine domain 2016 webpage or Abraham and Richard (unpublished).

License

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

Technical Details
Table ID 3480
Data type Table
Row count 12
Columns Fishing_year, Trawl, Bottom_longline, Surface_longline, Total
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
History
Added 19 Oct 2016
Last updated 19 Oct 2016
Revisions 5 - Browse all revisions
Current revision Imported on Oct. 26, 2016 from CSV .