Median Escherichia coli concentration

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8007
77
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

E.coli is a type of bacteria commonly found in the intestines of warm–blooded animals (including people). When found in freshwater, it can indicate the presence of pathogens associated with faecal contamination, from sources such as waste from humans and farmed animals such as sheep and cows. E.coli concentrations can vary due to differences in land use, climate, elevation, and geology. High E. coli concentrations may cause illness in humans and animals if ingested. This is an important consideration for human health, particularly where people use the river for swimming or boating.
This dataset relates to the ""River water quality: bacteria (Escherichia coli)"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Layer ID 52698
Data type Vector point
Feature count 785
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrate, ammonia and dissolved reactive phosphorus concentrations, NGMP sites, 2004–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8281
52
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"At high concentrations, nitrate–nitrogen may have health impacts where it is for untreated drinking water, and it is also plant nutrient which can contribute to excessive plant and algae growth, potentially damaging the ecological health of rivers and lakes.
Ammoniacal nitrogen can be toxic to fish, animals and people at moderate concentrations.
Nitrate can be an indicator of general groundwater degradation as often it is accompanied by other pollutants from human activities, such as faecal pathogens and pesticides.

Dissolved reactive phosphorus is a plant nutrient which can contribute to excessive plant and algae growth, damaging the ecological health of rivers and lakes if it enters surface water.
Surplus phosphorus can originate on land from fertilizer or animal manure, where it can be drained or leached into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. It can also occur naturally in aquifers as a result of water–rock interaction.

This dataset relates to the "Groundwater quality: phosphorus" and "Groundwater quality: nitrogen" measures on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52707
Data type Vector point
Feature count 101
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrate–nitrogen trends, 1989–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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9411
83
Added
19 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Feb 2016.

Small amounts of nitrogen are a natural component of healthy rivers. Nitrogen is transferred from land to water and is cycled through different forms, which can have different effects. Moderate concentrations of nitrate can cause weeds and algae to grow too fast. High concentrations of ammoniacal and nitrate nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other aquatic animals.
This dataset relates to the "River water quality trends: nitrogen" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Layer ID 53319
Data type Vector point
Feature count 77
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrate–nitrogen, 2009–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8460
96
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Small amounts of nitrogen are a natural component of healthy rivers. Nitrogen in rivers can vary due to differences in land use, climate, elevation, and geology. Nitrogen is transferred from land to water and is cycled through different forms, which can have different effects. Moderate concentrations of nitrate can cause weeds and algae to grow too fast. High concentrations of ammoniacal and nitrate nitrogen can be toxic to fish and other aquatic animals.
This dataset relates to the ""Geographic pattern of nitrogen in river water"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52723
Data type Vector point
Feature count 760
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrogen leaching, 2011

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6457
66
Added
09 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 09 Feb 2016.

"Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth. It occurs naturally, but in agricultural systems more nitrogen is commonly added to soils as fertiliser or from livestock waste. Not all the additional nitrogen can be taken up by plants. Some nitrogen will drain (leach) as nitrate from the soil and can enter waterways, potentially causing ecological harm. The amount of nitrate leaching from the soil varies around the country, as a result of different land uses, climates, and soils.
This dataset relates to the ""Geographic pattern of agricultural nitrate leaching"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52850
Data type Grid
Resolution 100.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Observed streambed sedimentation, 1990–2011

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7507
71
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Fine sediment is the collective term for inorganic particles deposited on the streambed less than 2mm in size. Urban development and agriculture and forestry around waterways can increase the amount of sediment entering river systems. Sedimentation can clog space between pebbles that are used by aquatic insects and fish, alter food sources, and remove sites used for egg laying. Excess sediment can affect the appeal of rivers and streams for recreation.
This dataset relates to the ""Streambed sedimentation"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Field names
NZREACH Stream segment label
SEDO Predicted observed percentage fine sediment cover, i.e. contemporary state
SEDE Predicted expected percentage fine sediment cover, i.e. reference state. "

Layer ID 52678
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 11684
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Predicted average Macroinvertebrate Community Index (MCI) score, 2007–2011

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8068
56
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Macroinvertebrates are small animals without backbones that live on and under submerged logs, rocks, and aquatic plants in the stream bed during some period of their life cycle. They play a central role in stream ecosystems by feeding on periphyton (algae or slime), macrophytes (aquatic plants), dead leaves and wood, or on each other. High Macroinvertebrate Community Index (MCI) scores generally indicate better stream health. Macroinvertebrates are good continuous indicators of the health of their stream environment. This is because they are relatively sedentary and long–lived (a year or more) which means they live with any stresses or changes that occur in their location (eg, pollution, habitat removal, floods and droughts). They complement discrete measures like chemical monitoring, which only reflects the condition at the exact time and place of sampling. Such monitoring might miss effects of a short–lived pollutant or an unanticipated type of disturbance.
This dataset relates to the ""River water quality: benthic macroinvertebrates"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52713
Data type Vector point
Feature count 512
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Predicted streambed sedimentation, 1990–2011

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7512
56
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Fine sediment is the collective term for inorganic particles deposited on the streambed less than 2mm in size. Urban development and agriculture and forestry around waterways can increase the amount of sediment entering river systems. Sedimentation can clog space between pebbles that are used by aquatic insects and fish, alter food sources, and remove sites used for egg laying. Excess sediment can affect the appeal of rivers and streams for recreation.
This dataset relates to the ""Streambed sedimentation"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Header Description
NZREACH Stream segment label
FINES Mean observed percentage cover of fine sediment (<2mm)
SD Standard deviation of observations
RANGE Range in observations
COUNT Number of observations
"

Layer ID 52679
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 676925
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Prediction of wetlands before humans arrived

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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10100
301
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Wetlands support unique biodiversity and provide important services. They clean water of nutrients and sediment, help dampen floods, provide habitat, and act as carbon sinks. They are also valued for their spiritual and cultural significance and as important sources of food and materials, such as flax. Draining them for agricultural and urban development has reduced their extent. Understanding this reduction provides insight into the loss of biodiversity and natural function.
This dataset relates to the ""Wetland extent"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52677
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 32422
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

River flows

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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18043
1292
Added
17 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Feb 2016.

"River flow refers to the quantity of water passing a point in the river over a certain amount of time. Different rivers have different flow patterns, such as sharp peak flows following rain with low flows in between, or high spring flows from snow melt. These flow characteristics affect how much water is available for irrigation, drinking water, hydro–electric power generation, and recreational activities such as fishing and boating. River flows are also very important for maintaining the health and form of a waterway.

This dataset relates to the "Geographic pattern of natural river flows" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

For more information, refer to the March 2015 report: 'Hydrological indices for national environmental reporting' www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/media/Fresh%20....

Layer ID 53309
Data type Vector multilinestring
Feature count 576277
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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