Coastal and estuarine water quality trends 2006–2017 and 2008–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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125
2
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

Data are 15 measures of coastal water quality at monitored sites in New Zealand. These 15 measures are dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, temperature, visual clarity, turbidity, suspended solids, ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrate-nitrite nitrogen, total nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, total phosphorus, faecal coliforms, enterococci, and chlorophyll-a.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti....

Table ID 99881
Data type Table
Row count 2594
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine economy 2007 - 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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130
0
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

The marine economy shows the contribution marine-based economic activities make to the New Zealand economy as measured by gross domestic product (GDP). Measuring the marine economy shows how New Zealand’s marine environment is used to generate economic activity and how this changes over time. However, these activities can be a source of pressure on New Zealand’s marine environment.

Estimates of the marine economy are often used globally as an indicator of the marine environment’s societal and economic importance (Kildow & McIlgorm, 2010; Suris-Regueiro et al, 2013).

This indicator measures the contribution of marine-related industries to New Zealand’s marine economy. Currently measurable activity categories are:

·         offshore minerals
·         shipping
·         fisheries and aquaculture
·         marine services
·         marine tourism and recreation
·         government and defence.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104057
Data type Table
Row count 429
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ocean acidification state 1998 - 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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0
0
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

Ocean acidification is the long-term decrease in the pH of our coastal waters and oceans. This indicator measures the change in pH in subantarctic surface waters at a station east of Otago from 1998 to 2017, and also the pH at selected coastal sites via the New Zealand Ocean Acidification Observing Network (NZOA-ON) from 2015 to 2017.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104052
Data type Table
Row count 6526
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Oceanic and coastal primary productivity 1998 - 2017

0
0
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

This indicator measures the amount of phytoplankton in ocean water around New Zealand using satellite data. Phytoplankton are microscopic algae and primary producers, meaning they enable those higher up the food web to survive. Phytoplankton growth is affected by the availability of nutrients and light, which in turn are affected by the structure of the upper water column. Large-scale changes to climate and oceanographic conditions can change the water column structure and thus lead to changes in phytoplankton growth and primary productivity. Phytoplankton growth supports marine organisms throughout the marine environment, including fish, mammals, and seabirds (Pinkerton et al, 2019). We monitor the changes in phytoplankton by measuring chl-a concentration to provide an understanding of how marine ecosystems are changing. This affects the services we rely on for economic, cultural, and recreational purposes, such as fisheries (Nixon & Buckley, 2002).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104058
Data type Table
Row count 10680
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal and oceanic extreme waves 2008 - 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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0
0
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

Extreme wave events can damage marine ecosystems and affect coastal infrastructure, ocean-based industries, and other human activities.

Changing wave characteristics can have impacts on natural systems, as most coastal and near-shore biological communities can be damaged or destroyed by extreme wave action (Ummenhofer & Mehl, 2017). In another example, extreme waves can disrupt ferries such as those crossing the Cook Strait. Sailings are often cancelled when significant wave heights exceed six metres.

It is important to report on extreme waves to gain greater insight into their frequency, particularly as sea level and storm surges are projected to increase and can compound wave effects.

In this dataset, an extreme wave event is defined as a continuous 12-hour period during which the significant wave height equals or exceeds one of three height thresholds: four, six, or eight metres.

Four-metre-tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104060
Data type Table
Row count 793
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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