Seabird fishing-related mortality by conservation status (2006/7 to 2012/13)

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5687
7
Added
21 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 21 Oct 2016.

Along with sea lions, fur seals, and dolphins, seabirds are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters (exclusive economic zone and territorial sea). Estimating seabird deaths from bycatch in commercial fishing is one way of assessing the pressure some seabird species face from current fishing practices. About one-third of our 92 resident seabird species and subspecies are considered to be threatened with extinction.
The fishing-related mortality category is derived from a semi-quantitative risk assessment conducted by Richard and Abraham (2015). We are using the threat rating assigned by Richard and Abraham (2015) for Our Marine Environment 2016. The Environment Aotearoa 2015 report used the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) risk rating. This results in a change to risk rating for one threatened species, which has a medium rating in the report but a high rating from MPI. This species is the Stewart Island shag, Leucocarbo chalconotus.

Table ID 53506
Data type Table
Row count 113
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Sea-bird fishing-related mortality by conservation status (2006/7 to 2012/13)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5849
19
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Along with sea lions, fur seals, and dolphins, seabirds are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters. Reporting on the risk of threatened and at-risk seabirds dying as a result of fishing activities each year is one way of assessing the pressure some seabird species face from current fishing practices.
This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: seabirds" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52501
Data type Table
Row count 113
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of trawl tows (1990–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5090
24
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging (where fishing gear is towed near or along the ocean floor) can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. These fishing methods can also stir up sediment from the seabed, creating sediment plumes that can smother sensitive species. Recovery times for affected habitats and species depend on their sensitivity and the area affected by trawling or dredging. Bottom trawling is carried out on or near the seabed in both shallow and deep waters. Dredging is carried out on the seabed in shallow waters and targets marine creatures such as scallops. This measure focuses on deepwater areas (waters deeper than 200m).

Table ID 53487
Data type Table
Row count 75
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of dredge tows (1990–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4670
8
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging, when fishing nets or dredges are towed near and along the seabed, can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed, shading (in shallow waters) or smothering marine species. This measure focuses on coastal areas (waters shallower than 250m). Focusing on coastal benthic habitats is important as these face multiple threats (for example from land-based activities) in addition to fishing.

Table ID 53485
Data type Table
Row count 50
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin deaths (1921–2008)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6572
25
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

The Hector’s and Māui’s dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. They are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui’s dolphin is nationally critical. Reporting incidental dolphin deaths from fishing helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52498
Data type Table
Row count 65
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths (1921–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6654
47
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

The Hector’s and Māui dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. These coastal dolphins are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). Māui dolphins are found on the west coast of the North Island, most often between Maunganui Bluff, north of Dargaville, and New Plymouth. Hector’s dolphins are mostly found around the South Island. Both subspecies are threatened with extinction. The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui dolphin is nationally critical. Dolphins can become entangled in fishing gear used by both commercial and recreational fishers, with set nets posing a particularly high risk. Reporting the bycatch of protected species helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
We report on two aspects of Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths based on data extracted from the Department of Conservation (DOC) Incident Database for 1921–2015: the number of dolphin deaths by cause of death, including a comparison of deaths over 1996–2015; and the number of dolphin deaths from entanglement by type of fishing gear.

Table ID 53475
Data type Table
Row count 561
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Fishing effort (number of trawl tows) by year (1990–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6584
83
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Seabed trawling is the practice of towing fishing nets near or along the ocean floor. The towing process can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed, creating sediment plumes that can smother sensitive species and change light conditions. This can affect marine species (eg by limiting their ability to generate energy through photosynthesis).
This dataset relates to the "Commercial seabed trawling and dredging" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52504
Data type Table
Row count 75
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Fishing effort (number of dredge tows) by year (1990–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4958
39
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Seabed trawling is the practice of towing fishing nets near or along the ocean floor. The towing process can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed. This creates sediment plumes that change light conditions. This can affect marine species (for example by limiting their capacity to generate energy through photosynthesis) and smother sensitive species.
This dataset relates to the "Commercial seabed trawling and dredging" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52505
Data type Table
Row count 50
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Sea lions and fur seals are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters, along with seabirds and dolphins. Estimating the bycatch of sea lions and fur seals indicates the pressures they face from current fishing practices.
The New Zealand sea lion Phocarctos hookeri is threatened with extinction and is classified as nationally critical. Its population is steadily falling at some breeding locations. Fisheries are one of the pressures on the species.
The Fisheries Act 1996 designates this species as protected and requires mitigation measures to reduce bycatch (Ministry for Primary Industries, 2014).This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: sea lion and fur seal" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52496
Data type Table
Row count 25
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated sea lion captures in all trawl fisheries (1996–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5029
13
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

Sea lions and fur seals are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters, along with seabirds and dolphins. Trawling poses a risk to both species. Fur seals can also be captured by other fishing gear, including long lines. Estimating the bycatch of sea lions and fur seals indicates the pressures they face from current fishing practices.
The New Zealand sea lion Phocarctos hookeri is threatened with extinction and is classified as nationally critical. Its population is steadily falling at some breeding locations (Baker et al, 2010). Fisheries are one of the pressures on the species.
The Fisheries Act 1996 designates this species as protected and requires mitigation measures to reduce bycatch (Ministry for Primary Industries, 2014).

Table ID 53471
Data type Table
Row count 19
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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