Coastal and estuarine water quality state 1973–2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6120
32
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

Data are for 15 measures of coastal water  quality at monitored sites in New Zealand. These 15 measures are dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, temperature, visual clarity, turbidity, suspended solids, ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrate-nitrite nitrogen, total nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, total phosphorus, faecal coliforms, enterococci, and chlorophyll-a.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti....

Table ID 99882
Data type Table
Row count 2058
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of seabird species and subspecies (2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7651
38
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand has 92 seabird and 14 shorebird species and subspecies (taxa). We have the highest number of endemic seabirds (found only in a particular area) in the world. Nearly 25 percent of the world’s seabird species breed in the New Zealand region, and almost 10 percent only breed here. Seabirds and shorebirds tend to be at or near the top of the food chain, and thrive only if the marine ecosystem is healthy. Decreasing bird populations can signal that the ecosystem is degrading.
This dataset relates to the "Conservation status of seabirds and shorebirds" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52511
Data type Table
Row count 92
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Area of seabed trawled by BOMEC habitat classes (1990–2011)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8107
12
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging (where fishing gear is towed near or along the ocean floor) can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. These fishing methods can also stir up sediment from the seabed, creating sediment plumes that can smother sensitive species. Recovery times for affected habitats and species depend on their sensitivity and the area affected by trawling or dredging. Bottom trawling is carried out on or near the seabed in both shallow and deep waters. Dredging is carried out on the seabed in shallow waters and targets marine creatures such as scallops. This measure focuses on deepwater areas (waters deeper than 200m).

Table ID 53488
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ocean storms (1979–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6601
21
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

The ocean storm index estimates the number of days in a year when wind speeds exceed gale and storm force on the Beaufort Scale. In a gale, sea conditions are rough and waves can be over six metres high. In a storm, waves can be over 10 metres high. To put this into context, on land a near gale would make walking difficult, and a storm would cause some damage to roofs, chimneys, and trees. Climate change could lead to changes in the frequency and intensity of storms. More frequent and intense storms will likely be a stressor for habitats and species.
The ocean storm index estimates the number of days that wind speeds exceed gale and storm force on the Beaufort Scale. The Beaufort Scale is a widely used international classification that rates sea conditions from 0 (calm) to 12 (hurricane). We report on estimated wind speeds broken down to:
- gales – measure 8 on the scale, have rough sea conditions with wind speeds of approximately 62–74 km per hour and wave heights of 5.5 metres
- storms – measure 10 on the scale, have wind speeds of approximately 89–102 km per hour and wave heights of 9–11.5 metres (McDonald & Parsons, 2016)

Table ID 53465
Data type Table
Row count 74
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal and oceanic extreme waves 2008 - 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2917
23
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

Extreme wave events can damage marine ecosystems and affect coastal infrastructure, ocean-based industries, and other human activities.

Changing wave characteristics can have impacts on natural systems, as most coastal and near-shore biological communities can be damaged or destroyed by extreme wave action (Ummenhofer & Mehl, 2017). In another example, extreme waves can disrupt ferries such as those crossing the Cook Strait. Sailings are often cancelled when significant wave heights exceed six metres.

It is important to report on extreme waves to gain greater insight into their frequency, particularly as sea level and storm surges are projected to increase and can compound wave effects.

In this dataset, an extreme wave event is defined as a continuous 12-hour period during which the significant wave height equals or exceeds one of three height thresholds: four, six, or eight metres.

Four-metre-tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104060
Data type Table
Row count 793
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin deaths (1921–2008)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8706
27
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

The Hector’s and Māui’s dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. They are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui’s dolphin is nationally critical. Reporting incidental dolphin deaths from fishing helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: Hector’s and Māui’s dolphin" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52498
Data type Table
Row count 65
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine economy: building consents (2007–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6880
7
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

The marine economy shows the contribution of marine-based economic activities to the New Zealand economy. Measuring the marine economy shows how New Zealand’s marine environment is used to generate economic activity and how this changes over time. However, these activities can also be a source of pressure on New Zealand’s marine environment.
Building consent data on wharves and wharf sheds is used to provide estimates for activity within the marine construction category. Building consents are an estimate, at the time of applying for the consent, of the value of the work to be put in place. For more information, see Statistics New Zealand (2016).

Table ID 53490
Data type Table
Row count 28
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Primary productivity - chlorophyll-a anomalies (1997–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7876
27
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Phytoplankton are primary producers and form the basis of the oceans’ food chains. They contain the pigment chlorophyll-a (chl-a), which they use to create their own food through photosynthesis. We study concentrations of chl-a in phytoplankton to assess primary productivity in our oceans. Changes in productivity are likely to affect food chains and ultimately affect marine biodiversity, including the species we rely on for economic, cultural, or recreational purposes.
This dataset relates to the "Primary productivity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52520
Data type Table
Row count 2080
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Cumulative overlap of coastal trawl footprint by BOMEC class (2008–12)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7881
13
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Seabed trawling, when fishing nets are towed near and along the ocean floor, can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed, shading or smothering marine species. For this measure, coastal areas are waters shallower than 250m.
This dataset relates to the "Commercial coastal seabed trawling" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52507
Data type Table
Row count 22
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Maximum latitudinal extent of selected key non-indigenous species

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6984
6
Added
23 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 23 Oct 2016.

Marine non-indigenous (exotic) species arrive in New Zealand waters on the hulls of international vessels (biofouling) or in discharged ballast waters. Some have little impact or cannot survive in New Zealand waters; others have a negative impact on our native habitats and species and become pests. They can compete with, and prey on, indigenous species, modify natural habitats, affect marine industries or can alter ecosystem processes. The potential impact of non-indigenous species on our native habitats and species means they could threaten our cultural and natural heritage, as well as economic activities such as commercial and recreational fishing, shellfish harvesting, and aquaculture.
The maximum latitudinal extent is the range between the northern-most and southern-most records of these species.

Table ID 53507
Data type Table
Row count 32
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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