Ocean acidification state 1998 - 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2584
11
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

Ocean acidification is the long-term decrease in the pH of our coastal waters and oceans. This indicator measures the change in pH in subantarctic surface waters at a station east of Otago from 1998 to 2017, and also the pH at selected coastal sites via the New Zealand Ocean Acidification Observing Network (NZOA-ON) from 2015 to 2017.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104052
Data type Table
Row count 6526
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Time series for two coastal sea surface temperature monitoring stations (1953–2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7148
58
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Coastal sea-surface temperature is influenced by solar heating and cooling, latitude, and local geography. It is hard for some marine species to survive when the sea temperature changes. This can affect marine ecosystems and processes. It can also affect fish-farming industries based in our coastal areas.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52525
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Sea-bird fishing-related mortality by conservation status (2006/7 to 2012/13)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7402
19
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Along with sea lions, fur seals, and dolphins, seabirds are the protected species most directly affected by fisheries in New Zealand waters. Reporting on the risk of threatened and at-risk seabirds dying as a result of fishing activities each year is one way of assessing the pressure some seabird species face from current fishing practices.
This dataset relates to the "Bycatch of protected species: seabirds" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52501
Data type Table
Row count 113
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Mean chlorophyll-a concentrations and anomalies (1997–2016)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6609
31
Added
25 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Oct 2016.

Measured oceanic chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentrations as an indicator of marine primary productivity. Phytoplankton are primary producers of biomass (mass of living organisms) and form the main basis of marine food chains. They use the chl-a pigment to capture the sun’s energy through the process of photosynthesis. Phytoplankton growth is affected by the availability of nutrients and light, which in turn are affected by the structure of the surface water column. The surface water column structure is affected by oceanographic and climate processes; large-scale changes to climate and oceanographic conditions can lead to changes in phytoplankton growth and chl-a concentrations.

Table ID 53509
Data type Table
Row count 2220
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Water quality parameters in coastal and estuarine environments (2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand

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7845
89
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Coastal and estuarine ecosystems are affected by changes in the levels of nutrients, oxygen, and light. An overload of nutrients can be toxic or lead to algal blooms. These blooms can kill marine life by depleting oxygen levels. Suspended sediment can smother habitats or reduce light levels, affecting photosynthesis. We report on five measures of water quality: turbidity (murkiness), dissolved oxygen, and the dissolved nutrients nitrate- and nitrite-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and total phosphorus.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal and estuarine water quality" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52508
Data type Table
Row count 1623
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of seabird species and subspecies (2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7096
38
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand has 92 seabird and 14 shorebird species and subspecies (taxa). We have the highest number of endemic seabirds (found only in a particular area) in the world. Nearly 25 percent of the world’s seabird species breed in the New Zealand region, and almost 10 percent only breed here. Seabirds and shorebirds tend to be at or near the top of the food chain, and thrive only if the marine ecosystem is healthy. Decreasing bird populations can signal that the ecosystem is degrading.
This dataset relates to the "Conservation status of seabirds and shorebirds" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52511
Data type Table
Row count 92
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Bycatch of protected species: Hector’s and Māui dolphins

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3157
18
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

The South Island Hector’s and Māui dolphins are among the world’s smallest marine dolphins. Both are subspecies of the Hector’s dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. These coastal dolphins are endemic to New Zealand, which means that they are not found anywhere else. The Māui dolphin is found in the inshore waters of the west coast of the North Island, most often from Maunganui Bluff, north of Dargaville, to New Plymouth. The South Island Hector’s dolphin (hereafter referred to as ‘Hector’s dolphin’) is mostly found in the inshore waters around the South Island. Both subspecies are threatened with extinction: Hector’s dolphins have a population estimated at 15,000 and are classified as nationally vulnerable, while Māui dolphins have a population estimated at 63 individuals over one year old and are classified as nationally critical (Baker et al, 2019; MacKenzie & Clement, 2016; Baker et al, 2016).

Dolphins can become entangled in fishing gear used by both commercial and recreational fishers, with set nets posing a particularly high risk. The accidental capture of marine life in fishing gear is typically referred to as bycatch. Reporting the causes of death of protected species and specifically identifying the number of animals killed as a result of fishing activities helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.

DOC’s Hector’s and Māui dolphin incident database 1921-2018 provides data on reported deaths of Hector’s and Māui dolphins.

This indicator measures the number of reported Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths from entanglement, categorised by type of fishing gear where possible, since 1998. The number of entanglements is compared to the total number of reported deaths.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 103967
Data type Table
Row count 337
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Commercial catch for sharks and rays

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6807
32
Added
24 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Oct 2016.

New Zealand waters have at least 117 species of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, and other cartilaginous fish species). They are particularly vulnerable to overfishing because they are long-lived, mature slowly, and have a low reproductive rate. Chondrichthyans are important for healthy ocean ecosystems, and reporting their commercial catch and bycatch helps us understand the sustainability of our fisheries.

Table ID 53508
Data type Table
Row count 453
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of shorebird species and subspecies (2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7324
11
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand has 92 seabird and 14 shorebird species and subspecies (taxa). Seabirds and shorebirds tend to be at or near the top of the food chain, and thrive only if the marine ecosystem is healthy. Decreasing bird populations can signal that the ecosystem is degrading.
This dataset relates to the "Conservation status of seabirds and shorebirds" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52513
Data type Table
Row count 20
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Commercial catch for shark and ray species (2005–12)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6256
16
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand waters have at least 113 species of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, and other cartilaginous fish species). They are particularly vulnerable to overfishing because they are long-lived, mature slowly, and have a low reproductive rate. Chondrichthyans are important for healthy ocean ecosystems, and reporting their commercial catch and bycatch helps us understand the sustainability of our fisheries.
This dataset relates to the "Commercial catch: sharks and rays" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52515
Data type Table
Row count 360
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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