Frost and warm days, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2388
17
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The number of frost and warm days changes from year to year in response to climate variation, such as the warming pattern induced by El Niño. Climate models project we may experience fewer cold and more warm extremes in the future. Changes in the number of frost and warm days can affect agriculture, recreation, and our behaviour, for example, what we do to keep safe on icy roads or whether to use air conditioning to keep cool.
A frost day is when the minimum temperature recorded is below 0 degrees Celsius. It refers to a temperature measured in an instrument screen 1.2 m above the ground rather than a ‘ground frost’. We define a warm day as having a maximum recorded temperature above 25 degrees Celsius. The threshold of 25 degrees Celsius is chosen to represent days where action might be taken to keep cool (eg turn air conditioning on).
This dataset gives the number of frost and warm days per month and calendar year for New Zealand, the North and South Islands, and all 30 sites.
For frost days we have used calendar years. For warm days we have used growing season (July 1 – June 30 of the following year).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89387
Data type Table
Row count 32667
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Global and New Zealand temperature anomalies, 1909–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2386
9
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

This dataset compares temperatures anomalies from NIWA's 'seven-station' temperature series with three global temperature series.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89452
Data type Table
Row count 855
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Global and New Zealand temperatures, five year running average (1911–2010)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2343
25
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Temperature change is influenced by changes in atmospheric composition that result from greenhouse gas emissions. It is also linked to atmospheric circulation changes (eg the El Niño southern oscillation). It can have a significant effect on agriculture, energy demand, and recreation. The primary aim of the datasets is to provide a tool to show average New Zealand and global temperatures compared to a reference temperature in order to compare this with expected global climate change in response to mechanisms such as atmospheric carbon dioxide, volcanic aerosols, and solar irradiance changes. Further information can be found in:
Tait, A, Macara, G, & Paul, V. (2014) Preparation of climate datasets for the 2015 Environmental Synthesis Report: Temperature, Rainfall, Wind, Sunshine and Soil Moisture. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Fwn9AL on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "National temperature time series" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52573
Data type Table
Row count 929
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Global greenhouse gas emissions (1990–2011)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2632
29
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere. GHGs absorb some of the heat radiating from the Earth’s surface and warm the atmosphere. In turn, this warming changes our climate. Some GHG emissions are removed, primarily by forests. For this reason, we use net emission rather than gross emission values to represent the total amount of gas contributed to the atmosphere.
This data is compiled from two sources. The UNFCCC (United Nations) GHG data and CAIT 2.0 (World Resources Institute, climate analysis indicators tool 2014).
This dataset relates to the "Global greenhouse gas emissions" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52564
Data type Table
Row count 5258
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Global production of ozone depleting substances, 1986–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2664
5
Added
17 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Oct 2017.

Ozone in the stratosphere is destroyed in a catalytic reaction with a range of chemical species (mainly CFCs) that are emitted through human activities. The emission of these chemicals is closely related to the amount of the chemicals that are produced. The Montreal protocol helps the UNEP collect information on the production of ozone depleting substances.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89474
Data type Table
Row count 9
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Greenhouse gas concentrations at Baring Head, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2670
11
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

We report on GHG concentrations in ‘clean air’ measured at Baring Head, near Wellington. These measurements give us a good idea of global concentrations and help us infer long-term impacts on ocean acidity, temperature, sea level and glaciers.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89412
Data type Table
Row count 1103
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ground-level ozone concentrations, Auckland, 2001–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1985
10
Updated
20 Nov 2019

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 20 Nov 2019.

Ground-level (tropospheric) ozone (O3) exists at a natural background level but is also produced when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds from vehicle emissions, petrol fumes, industrial processes solvents, and other human-made sources react in the presence of sunlight. It is the primary component of photochemical smog.
Ozone also occurs naturally in the stratosphere, where it protects us from ultraviolet radiation – this ozone occasionally can mix downwards to ground level.
Because sunlight and warmth are required for the chemical reactions that form ground-level ozone, peak concentrations often occur in summer when daylight hours are longer and temperatures are higher. Since the precursors for ozone can travel downwind from their sources before they react with sunlight, ozone concentrations can be high many kilometres from the precursor emissions’ sources.
Exposure to high concentrations of ozone can cause respiratory health problems and is linked to cardiovascular health problems and mortality. It can also damage vegetation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98423
Data type Table
Row count 535064
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater pesticides survey, 2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2669
14
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Pesticides, which include insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and plant growth regulators, are commonly used in New Zealand to control insects, diseases and weeds in primary industries such as agricultural farming, forestry and horticulture. Once applied to land or crops, pesticides can make their way through soil and enter groundwater systems.

File contains whether a pesticide was detected at monitored wells, and if so, what the concentration is. File also includes surrounding land use, well use, well diameter, well depth, and screen depth, where available.

Table ID 53605
Data type Table
Row count 153
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality state 2010–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1403
9
Added
14 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Apr 2019.

This dataset measures groundwater quality in New Zealand’s aquifers based on measurements made at monitored sites. Many factors influence the quality of our groundwater. Nitrogen, which occurs naturally in groundwater, can increase in concentrations due to agricultural and urban land use, and infrastructure such as waste treatment plants. High concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes that receive inflows from groundwater. Ammoniacal nitrogen can cause an undesirable smell that may make groundwater unsuitable for drinking water. Natural processes in groundwater can convert nitrate-nitrogen into ammoniacal nitrogen or other forms under some chemical conditions. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. Too much nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E. coli in groundwater is measured in colony forming units (cfu) and can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99855
Data type Table
Row count 741
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality trends 2005–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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768
9
Added
15 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Apr 2019.

This dataset measures groundwater quality in New Zealand’s aquifers based on measurements made at monitored sites. Many factors influence the quality of our groundwater. Nitrogen, which occurs naturally in groundwater, can increase in concentrations due to agricultural and urban land use, and infrastructure such as waste treatment plants. High concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen in groundwater can affect human health and the quality of surrounding rivers and lakes that receive inflows from groundwater. Ammoniacal nitrogen can cause an undesirable smell that may make groundwater unsuitable for drinking water. Natural processes in groundwater can convert nitrate-nitrogen into ammoniacal nitrogen or other forms under some chemical conditions. Surplus phosphorus drains (leaches) into groundwater as dissolved reactive phosphorus. Too much nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, and phosphorus can lead to excessive plant and algae growth where groundwater flows into surface water. E. coli in groundwater is measured in colony forming units (cfu) and can indicate the presence of pathogens (disease-causing organisms) from animal or human faeces. The pathogens can cause illness for anyone who ingests them.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99856
Data type Table
Row count 448
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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