Benzene concentrations 2012–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4233
17
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

Benzene is a volatile organic compound. Motor vehicle use and home heating are the main sources of airborne benzene emissions. Natural sources include volcanoes and forest fires. Benzene can affect the nervous system and is associated with some forms of cancer.

Benzene is emitted by human-made (motor vehicles, burning wood or coal for home heating, and some industrial activities) and natural (volcanoes and forest fires) sources.

Column headings:
- Con_mcg_m3 = Concentration in micrograms per cubic metre (μg/m3)

This dataset relates to the "Benzene concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52429
Data type Table
Row count 16
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lightning by region

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4369
17
Added
11 Nov 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Nov 2016.

Lightning is the discharge of electricity from thunderstorms. Ground strikes can cause significant damage to property and infrastructure, and injure or kill people and livestock. Lightning is often associated with other severe weather events, such as strong wind gusts. Thunderstorms may increase in frequency and intensity with climate change.
This dataset relates to the "Lightning" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 53515
Data type Table
Row count 621924
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated highly erodible land in North Island, by region, 2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4324
30
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Some areas of New Zealand’s North Island are classified as highly erodible land. They have steep slopes and are at high risk of mass soil movement due to the absence of woody vegetation cover with deep roots to hold the soil in place. This can lead to soil erosion. It is important to identify areas of land at risk of severe erosion to inform land use decisions and help prioritise soil conservation work.

This dataset relates to the "Estimated highly erodible land in the North Island" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52481
Data type Table
Row count 280
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Influenza like illness weekly consultation rates, 2000–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4382
7
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Influenza is a potentially life-threatening virus that spreads quickly from person to person. It is a significant public health issue in this country, with 10–20 percent of New Zealanders infected every year. While influenza can occur all year round, incidence generally peaks in winter and spring in New Zealand. Some studies suggest this is because the virus can survive longer outside the body in periods of colder weather and low humidity (dry conditions).
Influenza infections may decline as our climate changes. Warmer projected temperatures and higher humidity during winter and spring may contribute to reduced annual influenza rates. However, influenza infection is also affected by factors besides temperature and humidity.
These data are reported in an annual surveillance report by the Institute of Environmental Science and Research. See the 2015 report for more information (Institute of Environmental Science and Research, 2016).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89456
Data type Table
Row count 374
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated forest carbon stocks - Forest carbon stocks, 1990–2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4324
25
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand’s indigenous and exotic forests absorb and store carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis. As forests grow, the carbon stored in them increases. These carbon stocks help offset greenhouse gas emissions from sources such as agriculture, energy production, and transport.

Column headings:
type = vegetation type of forest
vol_tC = volume of carbon in tonnes

This dataset relates to the "Estimated forest carbon stocks" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52475
Data type Table
Row count 69
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Forest carbon stocks trends, 1990–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4374
13
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

New Zealand’s indigenous and exotic forests absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and store the carbon as biomass and in the soil. On average, more than twice as much carbon per hectare is stored in New Zealand’s mature indigenous forests than in exotic forests planted for wood production. Regenerating indigenous forests are also an important store of carbon, adding carbon every year as they grow. Total carbon stored in exotic forests will fluctuate over decades as the forests grow from seedlings to mature trees, are harvested, and replanted. Because CO2 is the major driver of climate change, forests provide important mitigation services and help New Zealand meet its climate change commitments.
The trend was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89410
Data type Table
Row count 2
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Change in farm numbers, 2002–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4186
43
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

The number of farms involved in agricultural activities, and how they are changing, is important because agricultural activities can affect soil health and water.

Agricultural activities include beef and sheep, dairy, arable, horticulture, deer, pigs, and other livestock.

Table ID 95340
Data type Table
Row count 560
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Oceanic sea surface temperature anomaly

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4304
22
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Sea surface temperature changes with climate drivers such as El Niño, and will change with climate change. The sea surface temperature anomaly provides an indication of the heat change in the ocean.
Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.
The oceanic sea surface temperature data comes from the NIWA Sea surface temperature Archive (NSA). There are 2 datasets, of NSA Annual means and NSA Annual Anomolies, covering the Tasman, subtropical (STW) and Southern Antarctic (SAW) area and the total area. The data is available from 1993 to 2013 and the unit of measure is degrees celcius.
For further information please see:
Uddstrom, MJ (2015) Sea Surface Temperature Data and Analysis for the 2015 Synthesis Report. For Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/hRbGUJ on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz).
This dataset relates to the "Sea surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52582
Data type Table
Row count 84
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Winter rainfall trends, 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4193
24
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Winter rainfall trends for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89405
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily peak, noon, and SED UV (UVM dataset)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4188
38
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause skin cancer. Ozone absorbs some UV radiation, and UV levels can vary in relation to changes in atmospheric ozone. Monitoring UV levels can help us understand current skin cancer risk.
The most reliable data on solar UV irradiance in New Zealand are from spectroradiometers developed and operated by NIWA at Lauder since summer 1989/90. The dataset supplied begins in 1993, and measurements includee daily peak, noon-time mean, and total daily dose of erythemal (skin-reddening) UV.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "UV intensity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52583
Data type Table
Row count 7530
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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