Annual glacier ice volumes (1978–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5626
33
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

A glacier is a body of slow-moving ice, at least one hectare in area that has persisted for two decades or longer. Glacier volume is strongly influenced by climate factors, such as temperature and precipitation. Changes in glacier ice volumes give some indication of changing climate conditions in New Zealand.
This dataset relates to the "Change in glacier ice volume" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52579
Data type Table
Row count 37
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Methane concentrations at Baring Head (1989–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5267
17
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Greenhouse gases (GHGS) in the atmosphere absorb heat radiating from Earth, warming the atmosphere. Emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases. Increases in these gases increase ocean acidity and are extremely likely to contribute to increased global temperatures, sea levels, and glacier melt. monitoring GHG concentrations allows us to infer long-term impacts on ocean acidity, temperature, sea level, and glaciers.
Greenhouse gases are generally well mixed around the globe. We use ‘clean air’ observations from Baring Head, near Wellington, to estimate global concentrations of the greenhouse gases – carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). These observations are made only when the air’s trajectory is from the south and away from any likely local sources of gas emissions. This gives an estimate representative of the concentrations over the Southern Ocean.
The observations tell us how the global atmosphere responds to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, and are an internationally representative measure of global concentrations. However, the Southern Hemisphere has slightly less greenhouse gas concentrations than the Northern Hemisphere, as well as a smaller seasonal variation.
Further information can be found in:
Mikaloff Fletcher, SE, & Nichol, S (2014) Measurements of Trace Gases in Well-mixed Air at Baring Head: Trends in carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/cZzREp on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
Trend results can be found in the excel file "Greenhouse gas concentrations trend statistics" at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/H776gZ.
This dataset relates to the "Greenhouse gas concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52570
Data type Table
Row count 293
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

The annual SOI compared with New Zealand's detrended temperature series, 1908/9–2015/6

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5727
10
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the movement of warm equatorial water across the Pacific Ocean and the atmospheric response. It occurs every 2–7 years, typically lasting 6–18 months. ENSO has three phases: neutral, El Niño and La Niña. In New Zealand an El Niño phase in summer can bring increased westerly winds, more rain in the west, and drought in the east; in winter it can lead to more cool southerly winds. During a La Niña phase we may experience more north-easterly winds, wetter conditions in the north and east, and higher sea levels.
This dataset relates to annual ENSO and detrended temperature data.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89380
Data type Table
Row count 216
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Autumn rainfall trends, 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6749
18
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Autumn rainfall trends for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89402
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated global production of major ozone-depleting substances (1986–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5256
13
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone in the stratosphere is destroyed in a catalytic reaction with a range of chemical species (mainly CFCs) that are emitted through human activities. The emission of these ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) is closely related to the amount of the chemicals that are produced. The ozone layer absorbs most of the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Monitoring global ODS production helps us track how much pressure these substances put on the atmosphere.
In accordance with article 7 of the Montreal Protocol – Parties are required to report data on the production, import and export of specified ozone depleting substances covered in the original protocol and the amendments ratified by that Party. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Ozone Secretariat data centre is the source of the information reported.
This dataset relates to the "global emissions of ozone-depleting substances" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52566
Data type Table
Row count 4428
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode annual values, 1887–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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6461
33
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89383
Data type Table
Row count 168
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ski field operating days (2003–14)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5455
27
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The climate can affect ski-field operations. Warm temperatures can result in less snow or shorter ski seasons. Extreme weather events such as storms can close fields. Monitoring the season length of ski fields and the percentage of days they are closed may indicate the extent of any effects of climate change. We assessed the season length and percentage of days closed for three South Island ski fields from 2003 to 2014.
This dataset relates to the "Ski-field operating days" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52571
Data type Table
Row count 180
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Atmospheric ozone, 1979 - 2019, state

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1764
1
Added
14 Oct 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2020.

DATA SOURCE: National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)
[Technical report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti...]

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Atmospheric ozone" indicator [available at www.stats.govtnz/indicators/atmospheric-ozone]

This indicator measures the thickness of total column ozone in Dobson Units observed above Lauder, Otago. We report minimum, average, and maximum annual total column ozone for each year from 1979 to 2019. We also report minimum, average, and maximum daily average column ozone by day of year from 1979 to 2019.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 105050
Data type Table
Row count 1464
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Water physical stocks for selected measures (1995–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5733
28
Added
15 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2015.

New Zealand is a water-rich country. Water is found in a network of waterways and lakes, as ground water, in glaciers, and in the soil and plants. Changes in temperature and precipitation patterns affect our water stocks, for example leading to low flows or floods. Water physical stocks show how climate changes can impact on our environment, its ecosystems, and ultimately our lifestyles.
Further information can be found in:
Collins, D, Zammit, C, Willsman, A & Henderson, R (2015) Surface water components of New Zealand’s National WaterAccounts, 1995-2014. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment May 2015. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Tebsax on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Water physical stocks: precipitation and evapotranspiration" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.
Variables: Abstraction for Hydrogeneration, Change in Ice, Change in Lakes, Change in Snow, Change in Soil Moisture, Discharge by Hydrogeneration, Evapotranspiration, Inflow from other regions, Outflow to other regions, Outflow to sea, Precipitation, Total.

Table ID 52596
Data type Table
Row count 240
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily peak UV index values, Invercargill, Leigh, Lauder, Paraparaumu and Christchurch (1981–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6219
23
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause skin cancer. Ozone absorbs some UV radiation, and UV levels can vary in relation to changes in atmospheric ozone. Monitoring UV levels can help us understand current skin cancer risk.
The Lauder spectroradiometer (UVM dataset) data are used to assure the reliability of broad-band erythermal UV (RB dataset) from five sites. Measurements supplied are daily peak, noon-time mean, and total daily dose of erythemal (skin-reddening) UV.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "UV intensity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52584
Data type Table
Row count 60760
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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