Daily peak UV index values, Invercargill, Leigh, Lauder, Paraparaumu and Christchurch (1981–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4306
22
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause skin cancer. Ozone absorbs some UV radiation, and UV levels can vary in relation to changes in atmospheric ozone. Monitoring UV levels can help us understand current skin cancer risk.
The Lauder spectroradiometer (UVM dataset) data are used to assure the reliability of broad-band erythermal UV (RB dataset) from five sites. Measurements supplied are daily peak, noon-time mean, and total daily dose of erythemal (skin-reddening) UV.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "UV intensity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52584
Data type Table
Row count 60760
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Growing degree days trend assessment, for New Zealand, the North Island, and the South Island, 1972/3–2015/6

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3639
11
Added
17 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Oct 2017.

Growing degree days (GDD) measures the amount of warmth available for plant and insect growth and can be used to predict when flowers will bloom and crops and insects will mature. GDD counts the total number of degrees Celsius each day is above a threshold temperature. In this report we used 10 degrees Celsius. Increased GDD means that plants and insects reach maturity faster, provided that other conditions necessary for growth are favourable, such as sufficient moisture and nutrients. As a measure of temperature, GDD experiences short-term changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño, and in the longer-term is affected by our warming climate.
Growing degree days (GDD) counts the number of days that are warmer than a threshold temperature (Tbase) in a year. GDD is calculated by subtracting the Tbase from the average daily temperature (maximum plus minimum temperature divided by two). If the average daily temperature is less than Tbase the GDD for that day is assigned a value of zero.
This dataset gives the trend in GDD over growing seasons (July 1 – June 30 of the following year) for New Zealand and the North and South Islands.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89476
Data type Table
Row count 3
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Campylobacteriosis, cryptosporidiosis, and salmonellosis notifications, 1997–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3530
3
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Bacteria and parasites are influenced by climate variables, and infection rates may increase in response to climate change and rising temperatures. Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, and Salmonella are three such organisms that can contaminate our food and water, leading to serious illness. Monitoring the incidence rates of illnesses can help us assess the health risks related to climate change and better prepare for disease outbreaks.
The numbers of notified cases of infection are sourced from EpiSurv, New Zealand’s national notifiable disease surveillance system. Various factors influence disease notification, and therefore the calculation of notifiable disease rates. For example, people are less likely to consult a medical practitioner when an illness is not severe (ESR, 2016a). The number of notified cases vary greatly from year to year due to New Zealand’s small population and low number of cases for some diseases (Environmental Science and Research, 2016). The August 2016 Camplylobacter outbreak in Havelock provides an example of this variation (ESR, 2016b).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89386
Data type Table
Row count 816
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily average column ozone by DOY (1978–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3260
8
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone (O3) is a gas that is of interest in two regions of Earth’s atmosphere – at ground level and in the upper atmosphere (stratosphere). Stratospheric ozone absorbs ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun and protects Earth from harmful levels of UV. Exposure to these UV rays has been linked to skin cancer. Monitoring variations in stratospheric ozone concentrations is important in New Zealand as we have high rates of skin cancers.
Ozone data for Lauder have been supplied in two forms: Measurements taken with Dobson spectrophotometer (number 72) and data assimilated from satellite measurements recalibrated against the global Dobson network. The Dobson spectrophotometer has been in operation at Lauder since January 1987. The timeseries for interpolated satellite data is available from 1978. Both timeseries are provided until 2013.
This dataset is the assimilated dataset which is available from 1978 to 2013. Measurements are in Dobson units (DU). One DU represents the amount of ozone molecules needed to produce a 0.01mm layer of pure ozone.
These datasets contain, annual measurements by DOY and annual statistics of mean, standard deviation, minimum and maximum.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Ozone concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52559
Data type Table
Row count 366
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of frost days for selected sites (1975–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3863
41
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The number of frost and hot days we experience each year can change in response to many climate factors, such as the warming pattern induced by El Niño. These numbers indicate the variations in our climate and are an important consideration in agriculture. They also affect our behaviour, for example, what we do to keep safe on icy roads or whether to use air conditioning to keep cool.
Further information can be found in:
Tait, A, Macara, G, & Paul, V. (2014) Preparation of climate datasets for the 2015 Environmental Synthesis Report: Temperature, Rainfall, Wind, Sunshine and Soil Moisture. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Fwn9AL on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Frost and hot days" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52575
Data type Table
Row count 12194
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily peak, noon, and SED UV (UVM dataset)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4118
39
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause skin cancer. Ozone absorbs some UV radiation, and UV levels can vary in relation to changes in atmospheric ozone. Monitoring UV levels can help us understand current skin cancer risk.
The most reliable data on solar UV irradiance in New Zealand are from spectroradiometers developed and operated by NIWA at Lauder since summer 1989/90. The dataset supplied begins in 1993, and measurements includee daily peak, noon-time mean, and total daily dose of erythemal (skin-reddening) UV.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "UV intensity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52583
Data type Table
Row count 7530
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Melanoma registration rates, 1948–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3771
12
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

New Zealand and Australia have the world’s highest rates of melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer. Melanoma is mainly caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, usually from the sun. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, especially during summer.
The risk of developing melanoma is affected by factors such as skin colour and type, family history, and the amount of sun exposure. Melanoma can affect people at any age, but the chance of developing a melanoma increases with age. We report on age-standardised rates of melanoma to account for the increasing proportion of older people in our population.
Our data on melanoma registrations come from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and the Ministry of Health's Mortality Collection. The passing of the Cancer Registry Act 1993 and Cancer Registry Regulations 1994 led to significant improvements in data quality and coverage (Ministry of Health, 2013). A sharp increase in registrations after 1993 is likely to have been related to these legislative and regulatory changes; for this reason we have only analysed data from 1996.
2014–15 data are provisional and subject to change.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89458
Data type Table
Row count 204
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average daily ozone concentrations, 1979–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3717
17
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

NIWA supplied ozone data in two forms, with different starting dates:
- measurements made using a Dobson spectrophotometer (number 72), from 1987
- data assimilated from satellite measurements recalibrated against the global Dobson network, from 1978.
NIWA takes measurements using the Dobson spectrophotometer 72 under clear-sky, direct sunlight conditions at Lauder in Otago. There are gaps in the time series due to days with cloud, rain, or too much wind. However, over the whole period, each individual calendar day of the year was measured. This allows us to calculate statistics based on the day of the year.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89464
Data type Table
Row count 1098
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode trend assessment, 1860–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4045
11
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89385
Data type Table
Row count 7
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in annual maximum one–day rainfall (rx1day), 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3807
8
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Trends in annual maximum one-day rainfall (rx1day), 1960–2016.
Intense rainfall can result in flash floods or land slips that damage homes and property, disrupt transportation, and endanger lives. It can also interfere with recreation and increase erosion. Changes to the frequency of intense rainfall events can alter biodiversity.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89433
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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