Frost and warm days trend assessment, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3597
15
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The number of frost and warm days changes from year to year in response to climate variation, such as the warming pattern induced by El Niño. Climate models project we may experience fewer cold and more warm extremes in the future. Changes in the number of frost and warm days can affect agriculture, recreation, and our behaviour, for example, what we do to keep safe on icy roads or whether to use air conditioning to keep cool.
A frost day is when the minimum temperature recorded is below 0 degrees Celsius. It refers to a temperature measured in an instrument screen 1.2m above the ground rather than a ‘ground frost’. We define a warm day as having a maximum recorded temperature above 25 degrees Celsius. The threshold of 25 degrees Celsius is chosen to represent days where action might be taken to keep cool (eg turn air conditioning on).
This dataset gives the trend in frost and warm days for New Zealand, the North and South Islands, and for all 30 sites.
For frost days we have used calendar years. For warm days we have used growing season (July 1 – June 30 of the following year).
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89388
Data type Table
Row count 60
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in total sunshine hours, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3616
15
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Trends in total sunshine hours, 1972–2016.
Sunshine is essential for our mental and physical well–being and plant growth. It is also important for tourism and recreation.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89444
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Methane concentrations at Baring Head (1989–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3301
12
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Greenhouse gases (GHGS) in the atmosphere absorb heat radiating from Earth, warming the atmosphere. Emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases. Increases in these gases increase ocean acidity and are extremely likely to contribute to increased global temperatures, sea levels, and glacier melt. monitoring GHG concentrations allows us to infer long-term impacts on ocean acidity, temperature, sea level, and glaciers.
Greenhouse gases are generally well mixed around the globe. We use ‘clean air’ observations from Baring Head, near Wellington, to estimate global concentrations of the greenhouse gases – carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). These observations are made only when the air’s trajectory is from the south and away from any likely local sources of gas emissions. This gives an estimate representative of the concentrations over the Southern Ocean.
The observations tell us how the global atmosphere responds to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, and are an internationally representative measure of global concentrations. However, the Southern Hemisphere has slightly less greenhouse gas concentrations than the Northern Hemisphere, as well as a smaller seasonal variation.
Further information can be found in:
Mikaloff Fletcher, SE, & Nichol, S (2014) Measurements of Trace Gases in Well-mixed Air at Baring Head: Trends in carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/cZzREp on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
Trend results can be found in the excel file "Greenhouse gas concentrations trend statistics" at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/H776gZ.
This dataset relates to the "Greenhouse gas concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52570
Data type Table
Row count 293
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

The annual SOI compared with New Zealand's detrended temperature series, 1908/9–2015/6

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3831
10
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the movement of warm equatorial water across the Pacific Ocean and the atmospheric response. It occurs every 2–7 years, typically lasting 6–18 months. ENSO has three phases: neutral, El Niño and La Niña. In New Zealand an El Niño phase in summer can bring increased westerly winds, more rain in the west, and drought in the east; in winter it can lead to more cool southerly winds. During a La Niña phase we may experience more north-easterly winds, wetter conditions in the north and east, and higher sea levels.
This dataset relates to annual ENSO and detrended temperature data.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89380
Data type Table
Row count 216
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions sub-sector summary data, 1990 and 2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4425
47
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions data for 1990 and 2015. Data are sourced from the 1990–2015 New Zealand Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory. Emissions are provided by sector (Energy, Indistrail processes and product use, Agriculture, Land–use, land–use change and Forestry; and Waste) and sector subcategory. IPCC 2004 global warming potential values were used during conversion to CO2 equivalents. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster. Reducing emissions of CH4 and N2O will decrease concentrations in the atmosphere more quickly.Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89431
Data type Table
Row count 96
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode monthly values, January 1979–December 2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3903
21
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89384
Data type Table
Row count 456
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Influenza hospital discharges by week (2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3464
10
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Influenza is a potentially life-threatening virus that spreads quickly from person to person. It is a significant public health issue in this country, with 10–20 percent of New Zealanders infected every year. While influenza outbreaks can occur all year round, rates peak in winter and spring. This is because the virus can survive longer outside the body in periods of colder weather and low absolute humidity (dry conditions).
This dataset relates to the "Influenza" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52554
Data type Table
Row count 53
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in percent of annual rainfall in the 95th percentile (r95ptot), 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3549
7
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Trends in percent of annual rainfall in the 95th percentile (r95ptot), 1960–2016.
Intense rainfall can result in flash floods or land slips that damage homes and property, disrupt transportation, and endanger lives. It can also interfere with recreation and increase erosion. Changes to the frequency of intense rainfall events can alter biodiversity.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89434
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions trends, 1990–2015

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3746
8
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster. Reducing emissions of CH4 and N2O will decrease concentrations in the atmosphere more quickly. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster. Reducing emissions of CH4 and N2O will decrease concentrations in the atmosphere more quickly.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89432
Data type Table
Row count 2
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in peak UV index value, 1981–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3976
5
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Trends in daily peak UV index values at Invercargill, Lauder (Otago region), Christchurch, Paraparaumu (Wellington region), and Leigh (Auckland region). The strength of UV light is expressed as a solar UV index, starting from 0 (no UV) to 11+ (extreme).
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light helps our bodies make vitamin D, which we need for healthy bones and muscles. However, too much exposure to UV light can cause skin cancer. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, and monitoring UV levels helps us understand the occurrence of skin cancer.
Ozone in the upper atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s UV light, protecting us from harmful levels. The amount of UV radiation reaching the ground varies in relation to changes in the atmospheric ozone concentrations. The Antarctic ozone hole lies well to the south of New Zealand and does not have a large effect on New Zealand’s ozone concentrations.
The trend was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89469
Data type Table
Row count 5
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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