Notified cases of campylobacteriosis and cryptosporidiosis (1997–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5167
9
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Bacteria and parasites like campylobacter, salmonella, and cryptosporidium can contaminate our food and water, leading to serious illness. Campylobacter, salmonella, and cryptosporidium are influenced by temperature and other climate variables, and incidence rates may increase as climate change causes temperatures to rise. Monitoring the incidence rates of illnesses can help us assess the health risks related to climate change and better prepare for disease outbreaks.
This dataset relates to the "Food and water-borne diseases" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52556
Data type Table
Row count 442
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions summary data, 1990–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5124
46
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions source and sink summary data by sector and gas for 1990-2015. Data are sourced from the 1990-2015 New Zealand Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89429
Data type Table
Row count 26
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Carbon dioxide concentrations at Baring Head (1972–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5138
18
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Greenhouse gases (GHGS) in the atmosphere absorb heat radiating from Earth, warming the atmosphere. Emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases. Increases in these gases increase ocean acidity and are extremely likely to contribute to increased global temperatures, sea levels, and glacier melt. Monitoring GHG concentrations allows us to infer long-term impacts on ocean acidity, temperature, sea level, and glaciers.
Greenhouse gases are generally well mixed around the globe. We use ‘clean air’ observations from Baring Head, near Wellington, to estimate global concentrations of the greenhouse gases – carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). These observations are made only when the air’s trajectory is from the south and away from any likely local sources of gas emissions. This gives an estimate representative of the concentrations over the Southern Ocean.
The observations tell us how the global atmosphere responds to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, and are an internationally representative measure of global concentrations. However, the Southern Hemisphere has slightly less greenhouse gas concentrations than the Northern Hemisphere, as well as a smaller seasonal variation.
Further information can be found in:
Mikaloff Fletcher, SE, & Nichol, S (2014) Measurements of Trace Gases in Well-mixed Air at Baring Head: Trends in carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/cZzREp on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Greenhouse gas concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52568
Data type Table
Row count 493
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ozone, Lauder, assimilated series (1978-2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5145
5
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone (O3) is a gas that is of interest in two regions of Earth’s atmosphere – at ground level and in the upper atmosphere (stratosphere). Stratospheric ozone absorbs ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun and protects Earth from harmful levels of UV. Exposure to these UV rays has been linked to skin cancer. Monitoring variations in stratospheric ozone concentrations is important in New Zealand as we have high rates of skin cancers.
Ozone data for Lauder have been supplied in two forms: Measurements taken with Dobson spectrophotometer (number 72) and data assimilated from satellite measurements recalibrated against the global Dobson network. The Dobson spectrophotometer has been in operation at Lauder since January 1987. The timeseries for interpolated satellite data is available from 1978. Both timeseries are provided until 2013.
This dataset is the assimilated dataset which is available from 1978 to 2013. Measurements are in Dobson units (DU). One DU represents the amount of ozone molecules needed to produce a 0.01mm layer of pure ozone.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Ozone concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52560
Data type Table
Row count 36
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Influenza hospital discharges by week (2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5102
11
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Influenza is a potentially life-threatening virus that spreads quickly from person to person. It is a significant public health issue in this country, with 10–20 percent of New Zealanders infected every year. While influenza outbreaks can occur all year round, rates peak in winter and spring. This is because the virus can survive longer outside the body in periods of colder weather and low absolute humidity (dry conditions).
This dataset relates to the "Influenza" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52554
Data type Table
Row count 53
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions detailed data, 1990 and 2015

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5048
37
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Detailed New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions data for 1990 and 2015 for Energy and Agriculture sectors. Data are sourced from the 1990–2015 New Zealand Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory. Includes sub–sub–sector data. Emissions are in kt and have not been standardised by conversion to CO2 equivalents. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster. Reducing emissions of CH4 and N2O will decrease concentrations in the atmosphere more quickly.Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89430
Data type Table
Row count 210
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Growing degree days monthly data by site, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4999
34
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Growing degree days (GDD) measures the amount of warmth available for plant and insect growth and can be used to predict when flowers will bloom and crops and insects will mature. GDD counts the total number of degrees Celsius each day is above a threshold temperature. In this report we used 10 degrees Celsius. Increased GDD means that plants and insects reach maturity faster, provided that other conditions necessary for growth are favourable, such as sufficient moisture and nutrients. As a measure of temperature, GDD experiences short-term changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño, and in the longer-term is affected by our warming climate.
This dataset gives the number of GDD per month and calendar year for all 30 sites.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89392
Data type Table
Row count 1290
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily peak, noon, and SED UV (UVM dataset)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4969
39
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause skin cancer. Ozone absorbs some UV radiation, and UV levels can vary in relation to changes in atmospheric ozone. Monitoring UV levels can help us understand current skin cancer risk.
The most reliable data on solar UV irradiance in New Zealand are from spectroradiometers developed and operated by NIWA at Lauder since summer 1989/90. The dataset supplied begins in 1993, and measurements includee daily peak, noon-time mean, and total daily dose of erythemal (skin-reddening) UV.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "UV intensity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52583
Data type Table
Row count 7530
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of extreme weather events identified by ICNZ (1975–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4917
53
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Extreme weather events are weather events that are rare or even statistically unlikely. In New Zealand, such events can be dangerous and costly, both socially and monetarily. They can cause damage that affects productivity and leads to millions of dollars in insurance claims.
This dataset relates to the "Insurance losses for extreme weather events" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52586
Data type Table
Row count 129
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Extreme wind, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4845
59
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Extreme wind annual statistics for 30 regionally representative sites. The number of days with a maximum gust in the 99th percentile provides information on the frequency of extreme wind events. Percentiles are obtained from all available daily maximum wind gust data. On average, the 99th percentile daily maximum wind gust will be exceeded on approximately 3.6 days per year. Therefore, annual counts higher than this indicate more days than usual with very strong wind gusts recorded; annual counts lower than 3.6 indicate fewer strong wind gust days than usual. By using a percentile threshold we can identify events that are extreme for a particular location. Some places are naturally subject to stronger winds than others, so vegetation can become ‘wind-hardened’ and may have a higher tolerance to high wind gusts (eg a 100 km/hr wind gust may be damaging at one location, but not at another). Using a relative threshold accounts for these differences and better captures extreme wind gust occurrences. The highest maximum gust per year and the average annual highest maximum wind gust both provide information on the magnitude of extreme wind events.
Steady wind can be an important resource, but strong gusts can damage property, topple trees, and disrupt transportation, communications, and electricity. Extreme wind events can occur with frontal weather systems, around strong convective storms such as thunderstorms, and with ex-tropical cyclones. Projections indicate climate change may alter the occurrence of extreme wind events, with the strength of extreme winds expected to increase over the southern half of the North Island and the South Island, especially east of the Southern Alps, and decrease from Northland to Bay of Plenty. Monitoring can help us gauge the potential of, and prepare for, such events.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89425
Data type Table
Row count 1327
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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