Notified cases of salmonellosis (1997–2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2474
8
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Bacteria and parasites like campylobacter, salmonella, and cryptosporidium can contaminate our food and water, leading to serious illness. Campylobacter, salmonella, and cryptosporidium are influenced by temperature and other climate variables, and incidence rates may increase as climate change causes temperatures to rise. Monitoring the incidence rates of illnesses can help us assess the health risks related to climate change and better prepare for disease outbreaks.
This dataset relates to the "Food and water-borne diseases" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52555
Data type Table
Row count 17
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated global production of major ozone-depleting substances (1986–2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3230
12
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone in the stratosphere is destroyed in a catalytic reaction with a range of chemical species (mainly CFCs) that are emitted through human activities. The emission of these ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) is closely related to the amount of the chemicals that are produced. The ozone layer absorbs most of the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Monitoring global ODS production helps us track how much pressure these substances put on the atmosphere.
In accordance with article 7 of the Montreal Protocol – Parties are required to report data on the production, import and export of specified ozone depleting substances covered in the original protocol and the amendments ratified by that Party. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Ozone Secretariat data centre is the source of the information reported.
This dataset relates to the "global emissions of ozone-depleting substances" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52566
Data type Table
Row count 4428
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Influenza hospital discharges by week (2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2997
9
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Influenza is a potentially life-threatening virus that spreads quickly from person to person. It is a significant public health issue in this country, with 10–20 percent of New Zealanders infected every year. While influenza outbreaks can occur all year round, rates peak in winter and spring. This is because the virus can survive longer outside the body in periods of colder weather and low absolute humidity (dry conditions).
This dataset relates to the "Influenza" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52554
Data type Table
Row count 53
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Day of year column ozone Dobson spectrophotometer measurements (1987–2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2469
5
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone (O3) is a gas that is of interest in two regions of Earth’s atmosphere – at ground level and in the upper atmosphere (stratosphere). Stratospheric ozone absorbs ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun and protects Earth from harmful levels of UV. Exposure to these UV rays has been linked to skin cancer. Monitoring variations in stratospheric ozone concentrations is important in New Zealand as we have high rates of skin cancers.
This ozone data for Lauder was taken with Dobson spectrophotometer (72) from 1987 to 2013. Measurements are in Dobson units (DU). One DU represents the amount of ozone molecules needed to produce a 0.01mm layer of pure ozone. These datasets contain annual measurements by DOY and DOY statistics of mean, standard deviation, minimum and maximum.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Ozone concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52561
Data type Table
Row count 366
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ozone, Lauder, assimilated series (1978-2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3041
4
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone (O3) is a gas that is of interest in two regions of Earth’s atmosphere – at ground level and in the upper atmosphere (stratosphere). Stratospheric ozone absorbs ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun and protects Earth from harmful levels of UV. Exposure to these UV rays has been linked to skin cancer. Monitoring variations in stratospheric ozone concentrations is important in New Zealand as we have high rates of skin cancers.
Ozone data for Lauder have been supplied in two forms: Measurements taken with Dobson spectrophotometer (number 72) and data assimilated from satellite measurements recalibrated against the global Dobson network. The Dobson spectrophotometer has been in operation at Lauder since January 1987. The timeseries for interpolated satellite data is available from 1978. Both timeseries are provided until 2013.
This dataset is the assimilated dataset which is available from 1978 to 2013. Measurements are in Dobson units (DU). One DU represents the amount of ozone molecules needed to produce a 0.01mm layer of pure ozone.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Ozone concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52560
Data type Table
Row count 36
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Carbon monoxide concentrations at Baring Head (2000–13)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2879
4
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Greenhouse gases (GHGS) in the atmosphere absorb heat radiating from Earth, warming the atmosphere. Emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases. Increases in these gases increase ocean acidity and are extremely likely to contribute to increased global temperatures, sea levels, and glacier melt. Monitoring GHG concentrations allows us to infer long-term impacts on ocean acidity, temperature, sea level, and glaciers.
Greenhouse gases are generally well mixed around the globe. We use ‘clean air’ observations from Baring Head, near Wellington, to estimate global concentrations of the greenhouse gases – carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). These observations are made only when the air’s trajectory is from the south and away from any likely local sources of gas emissions. This gives an estimate representative of the concentrations over the Southern Ocean.
The observations tell us how the global atmosphere responds to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, and are an internationally representative measure of global concentrations. However, the Southern Hemisphere has slightly less greenhouse gas concentrations than the Northern Hemisphere, as well as a smaller seasonal variation.
Further information can be found in:
Mikaloff Fletcher, SE, & Nichol, S (2014) Measurements of Trace Gases in Well-mixed Air at Baring Head: Trends in carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/cZzREp on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
Trend results can be found in the excel file "Greenhouse gas concentrations trend statistics" at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/H776gZ.
This dataset relates to the "Greenhouse gas concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52569
Data type Table
Row count 160
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Monthly El Niño Southern Oscillation Index, 1986–2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4287
59
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the movement of warm equatorial water across the Pacific Ocean and the atmospheric response. It occurs every 2–7 years, typically lasting 6–18 months. ENSO has three phases: neutral, El Niño and La Niña. In New Zealand an El Niño phase in summer can bring increased westerly winds, more rain in the west, and drought in the east; in winter it can lead to more cool southerly winds. During a La Niña phase we may experience more north-easterly winds, wetter conditions in the north and east, and higher sea levels.
This dataset relates to monthly ENSO values.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89381
Data type Table
Row count 372
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Rainfall, 1960–2016

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4520
169
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Daily rainfall values for 30 representative sites from 1960–2016.
Rain is vital for life – it supplies the water we need to drink and to grow our food, keeps our ecosystems healthy, and supplies our electricity. New Zealand’s mountainous terrain and location in the roaring forties mean rainfall varies across the country. Changes in rainfall amount or timing can significantly affect agriculture, energy, recreation, and the environment. For example, an increase or decrease of rainfall in spring can have marked effects on crops or fish populations.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89401
Data type Table
Row count 617808
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Total column ozone, Lauder, assimilated series (1978-2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2502
4
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone (O3) is a gas that is of interest in two regions of Earth’s atmosphere – at ground level and in the upper atmosphere (stratosphere). Stratospheric ozone absorbs ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun and protects Earth from harmful levels of UV. Exposure to these UV rays has been linked to skin cancer. Monitoring variations in stratospheric ozone concentrations is important in New Zealand as we have high rates of skin cancers.
Ozone data for Lauder have been supplied in two forms: Measurements taken with Dobson spectrophotometer (number 72) and data assimilated from satellite measurements recalibrated against the global Dobson network. The Dobson spectrophotometer has been in operation at Lauder since January 1987. The timeseries for interpolated satellite data is available from 1978. Both timeseries are provided until 2013.
This dataset is the assimilated dataset which is available from 1978 to 2013. Measurements are in Dobson units (DU). One DU represents the amount of ozone molecules needed to produce a 0.01mm layer of pure ozone.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Ozone concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52557
Data type Table
Row count 12643
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrous oxide concentrations at Baring Head (1996–2013)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

3082
4
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Greenhouse gases (GHGS) in the atmosphere absorb heat radiating from Earth, warming the atmosphere. Emissions from human activities increase the concentrations of these gases. Increases in these gases increase ocean acidity and are extremely likely to contribute to increased global temperatures, sea levels, and glacier melt. Monitoring GHG concentrations allows us to infer long-term impacts on ocean acidity, temperature, sea level, and glaciers.
Greenhouse gases are generally well mixed around the globe. We use ‘clean air’ observations from Baring Head, near Wellington, to estimate global concentrations of the greenhouse gases – carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon monoxide (CO). These observations are made only when the air’s trajectory is from the south and away from any likely local sources of gas emissions. This gives an estimate representative of the concentrations over the Southern Ocean.
The observations tell us how the global atmosphere responds to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, and are an internationally representative measure of global concentrations. However, the Southern Hemisphere has slightly less greenhouse gas concentrations than the Northern Hemisphere, as well as a smaller seasonal variation.
Further information can be found in:
Mikaloff Fletcher, SE, & Nichol, S (2014) Measurements of Trace Gases in Well-mixed Air at Baring Head: Trends in carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/cZzREp on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
Trend results can be found in the excel file "Greenhouse gas concentrations trend statistics" at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/H776gZ.
This dataset relates to the "Greenhouse gas concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52567
Data type Table
Row count 209
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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