Annual growing degree days

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6788
96
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Growing degree days (GDD) is the measure of how much warmth is available for plant and insect growth during a growing season. GDD information helps horticulturists and farmers predict plant growth and stock development. The GDD value changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño. Long-term changes in GDD are a measure of changing climate conditions.
Further information can be found in:
Tait, A, Macara, G, & Paul, V. (2014) Preparation of climate datasets for the 2015 Environmental Synthesis Report: Temperature, Rainfall, Wind, Sunshine and Soil Moisture. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Fwn9AL on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Growing degree days" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52574
Data type Table
Row count 12168
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Oceanic sea surface temperature, 1993–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4137
34
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

We used NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive, which is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately six-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom & Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.
Our data extends from about 30°S to 55°S, and from 160°E to 170°W and is grouped into five areas: the exclusive economic zone (EEZ), the Chatham Rise, northern subtropical waters, subantarctic waters, and the Tasman Sea.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89406
Data type Table
Row count 960
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation, 1871–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4717
57
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) is a long-term oscillation of sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean that can last from 20 to 30 years. Its positive and negative phases affect the strength and frequency of El Niño and La Niña. In New Zealand, the positive phase is linked to stronger west to southwest winds and more rain in the west. This trend is reversed during the negative phase.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89382
Data type Table
Row count 730
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of frost days for selected sites (1975–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4129
39
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The number of frost and hot days we experience each year can change in response to many climate factors, such as the warming pattern induced by El Niño. These numbers indicate the variations in our climate and are an important consideration in agriculture. They also affect our behaviour, for example, what we do to keep safe on icy roads or whether to use air conditioning to keep cool.
Further information can be found in:
Tait, A, Macara, G, & Paul, V. (2014) Preparation of climate datasets for the 2015 Environmental Synthesis Report: Temperature, Rainfall, Wind, Sunshine and Soil Moisture. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Fwn9AL on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Frost and hot days" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52575
Data type Table
Row count 12194
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions summary data, 1990–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3773
43
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions source and sink summary data by sector and gas for 1990-2015. Data are sourced from the 1990-2015 New Zealand Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89429
Data type Table
Row count 26
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Southern Annular Mode annual values, 1887–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3918
26
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

A consistent band of westerly wind flows across the Southern Hemisphere and circles the South Pole. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) describes how this band moves, either north towards the equator (negative phase) or south towards Antarctica (positive phase). A negative phase typically causes increased westerlies, unsettled weather, and storms in New Zealand. A phase can last several weeks, but changes can be rapid and unpredictable.
The SAM is one of three climate oscillations that affect our weather. The resulting changes in air pressure, sea temperature, and wind direction can last for weeks to decades, depending on the oscillation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89383
Data type Table
Row count 168
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Growing degree days annual growing season averages and totals, 1972/3–2015/6

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4707
24
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Growing degree days (GDD) measures the amount of warmth available for plant and insect growth and can be used to predict when flowers will bloom and crops and insects will mature. GDD counts the total number of degrees Celsius each day is above a threshold temperature. In this report we used 10 degrees Celsius. Increased GDD means that plants and insects reach maturity faster, provided that other conditions necessary for growth are favourable, such as sufficient moisture and nutrients. As a measure of temperature, GDD experiences short-term changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño, and in the longer-term is affected by our warming climate.
This dataset gives the average number of GDD over growing seasons (July 1 – June 30 of the following year) for New Zealand, the North and South Islands, and for all 30 sites.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89393
Data type Table
Row count 1389
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Influenza hospital discharges (2000–13)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4899
40
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Influenza is a potentially life-threatening virus that spreads quickly from person to person. It is a significant public health issue in this country, with 10–20 percent of New Zealanders infected every year. While influenza outbreaks can occur all year round, rates peak in winter and spring. This is because the virus can survive longer outside the body in periods of colder weather and low absolute humidity (dry conditions).
This dataset relates to the "Influenza" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52553
Data type Table
Row count 28
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual average Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation Index (1871–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5578
68
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) describes the long-term oscillation of the Pacific Ocean. The Pacific climate oscillation causes climate fluctuations that can influence New Zealand’s climate. For example, it can affect the strength and frequency of El Niño and La Niña events. In New Zealand, the positive phase of the IPO is linked to stronger west to southwest winds and more rain to the west. Such climate phases can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities.
The IPO is similar, and nearly equivalent, to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The PDO is a predictor of the impact of the climate oscillation in the northern Pacific.
This dataset relates to the "Inter-decadal Pacific oscillation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52591
Data type Table
Row count 143
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions sub-sector summary data, 1990 and 2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4590
44
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions data for 1990 and 2015. Data are sourced from the 1990–2015 New Zealand Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory. Emissions are provided by sector (Energy, Indistrail processes and product use, Agriculture, Land–use, land–use change and Forestry; and Waste) and sector subcategory. IPCC 2004 global warming potential values were used during conversion to CO2 equivalents. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster. Reducing emissions of CH4 and N2O will decrease concentrations in the atmosphere more quickly.Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89431
Data type Table
Row count 96
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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