Southern annular mode (1887–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6746
31
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is an index that describes climate variation around the South Pole and Antarctica, as far north as New Zealand. It indicates short-term climate variations that can influence New Zealand’s climate. Such climate variations can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities.
The variation is caused by the movement of a low-pressure belt that generates westerly winds. During a negative phase, the low pressure belt moves north, towards the equator. In New Zealand, this can cause increased westerly winds, unsettled weather, and storm activity over most of the country. Over the southern oceans, there are relatively less westerly winds and less storm activity.
During a positive phase, the low pressure belt moves south towards Antarctica. In New Zealand, this can cause relatively light winds and more settled weather. Over the southern oceans, there is increased westerly winds and storm activity.
This dataset relates to the "Southern annular mode" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52592
Data type Table
Row count 128
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in total sunshine hours, 1972–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5585
17
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Trends in total sunshine hours, 1972–2016.
Sunshine is essential for our mental and physical well–being and plant growth. It is also important for tourism and recreation.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89444
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual and Daily column ozone Dobson spectrophotometer measurements (1987–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5306
10
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Ozone (O3) is a gas that is of interest in two regions of Earth’s atmosphere – at ground level and in the upper atmosphere (stratosphere). Stratospheric ozone absorbs ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun and protects Earth from harmful levels of UV. Exposure to these UV rays has been linked to skin cancer. Monitoring variations in stratospheric ozone concentrations is important in New Zealand as we have high rates of skin cancers.
This ozone data for Lauder was taken with Dobson spectrophotometer (72) from 1987 to 2013. Measurements are in Dobson units (DU). One DU represents the amount of ozone molecules needed to produce a 0.01mm layer of pure ozone. These datasets contain annual measurements by DOY and DOY statistics of mean, standard deviation, minimum and maximum.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "Ozone concentrations" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52562
Data type Table
Row count 6389
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual ozone concentrations, 1979–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5642
17
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

NIWA supplied ozone data in two forms, with different starting dates:
- measurements made using a Dobson spectrophotometer (number 72), from 1987
- data assimilated from satellite measurements recalibrated against the global Dobson network, from 1978.
NIWA takes measurements using the Dobson spectrophotometer 72 under clear-sky, direct sunlight conditions at Lauder in Otago. There are gaps in the time series due to days with cloud, rain, or too much wind. However, over the whole period, each individual calendar day of the year was measured. This allows us to calculate statistics based on the day of the year.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89463
Data type Table
Row count 114
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in annual maximum one–day rainfall (rx1day), 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6562
10
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Trends in annual maximum one-day rainfall (rx1day), 1960–2016.
Intense rainfall can result in flash floods or land slips that damage homes and property, disrupt transportation, and endanger lives. It can also interfere with recreation and increase erosion. Changes to the frequency of intense rainfall events can alter biodiversity.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89433
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Global production of ozone depleting substances, 1986–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5556
5
Added
17 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Oct 2017.

Ozone in the stratosphere is destroyed in a catalytic reaction with a range of chemical species (mainly CFCs) that are emitted through human activities. The emission of these chemicals is closely related to the amount of the chemicals that are produced. The Montreal protocol helps the UNEP collect information on the production of ozone depleting substances.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89474
Data type Table
Row count 9
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Influenza hospitalisations, 2000–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5790
9
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Influenza is a potentially life-threatening virus that spreads quickly from person to person. It is a significant public health issue in this country, with 10–20 percent of New Zealanders infected every year. While influenza can occur all year round, incidence generally peaks in winter and spring in New Zealand. Some studies suggest this is because the virus can survive longer outside the body in periods of colder weather and low humidity (dry conditions).
Influenza infections may decline as our climate changes. Warmer projected temperatures and higher humidity during winter and spring may contribute to reduced annual influenza rates. However, influenza infection is also affected by factors besides temperature and humidity.
These data are reported in an annual surveillance report by the Institute of Environmental Science and Research. See the 2015 report for more information (Institute of Environmental Science and Research, 2016).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89457
Data type Table
Row count 17
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Atmospheric ozone, 1979 - 2019, trends

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1789
1
Added
14 Oct 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2020.

DATA SOURCE: National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)
[Technical report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti...]

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Atmospheric ozone" indicator [available at www.stats.govtnz/indicators/atmospheric-ozone]

This indicator measures the thickness of total column ozone in Dobson Units observed above Lauder, Otago. We report minimum, average, and maximum annual total column ozone for each year from 1979 to 2019, and trends. We also report minimum, average, and maximum daily average column ozone by day of year from 1979 to 2019.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 105051
Data type Table
Row count 6
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Melanoma registration trends, 1996–2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5440
6
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

New Zealand and Australia have the world’s highest rates of melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer. Melanoma is mainly caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, usually from the sun. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, especially during summer.
The risk of developing melanoma is affected by factors such as skin colour and type, family history, and the amount of sun exposure. Melanoma can affect people at any age, but the chance of developing a melanoma increases with age. We report on age-standardised rates of melanoma to account for the increasing proportion of older people in our population.
Our data on melanoma registrations come from the New Zealand Cancer Registry and the Ministry of Health's Mortality Collection. The passing of the Cancer Registry Act 1993 and Cancer Registry Regulations 1994 led to significant improvements in data quality and coverage (Ministry of Health, 2013). A sharp increase in registrations after 1993 is likely to have been related to these legislative and regulatory changes; for this reason we have only analysed data from 1996.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89460
Data type Table
Row count 57
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Influenza like illness weekly consultation rates, 2000–16

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6490
9
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Influenza is a potentially life-threatening virus that spreads quickly from person to person. It is a significant public health issue in this country, with 10–20 percent of New Zealanders infected every year. While influenza can occur all year round, incidence generally peaks in winter and spring in New Zealand. Some studies suggest this is because the virus can survive longer outside the body in periods of colder weather and low humidity (dry conditions).
Influenza infections may decline as our climate changes. Warmer projected temperatures and higher humidity during winter and spring may contribute to reduced annual influenza rates. However, influenza infection is also affected by factors besides temperature and humidity.
These data are reported in an annual surveillance report by the Institute of Environmental Science and Research. See the 2015 report for more information (Institute of Environmental Science and Research, 2016).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89456
Data type Table
Row count 374
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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