Groundwater quality, trend, 1999-2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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258
3
Added
07 Apr 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 07 Apr 2020.

This indicator measures groundwater quality in New Zealand’s aquifers and how it is changing over time, based on measurements made at monitored sites. We report on nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, chloride, conductivity and Escherichia coli (E. coli) including:

  • trends in concentrations for 10-year (2009–18) and 20-year (1999–2018) periods.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104571
Data type Table
Row count 1699
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lake submerged plant index, 1991 - 2019

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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288
0
Added
06 Apr 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 06 Apr 2020.

The most recent assessment of ecological condition of 295 lakes in New Zealand assessed on at least one occasion between 1991 and 2019 was measured using the lake submerged plant index (LakeSPI).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104564
Data type Table
Row count 295
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Modelled lake water quality, 2013-2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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273
2
Added
06 Apr 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 06 Apr 2020.

This indicator reports on six measures of lake water quality based on spatially modelled data for:

  • chlorophyll-a
  • total nitrogen
  • ammoniacal nitrogen
  • total phosphorus
  • water clarity
  • trophic level index (TLI3).

For these measures we report on:

  • modelled median values for the period 2013–17
  • for selected measures, how these values compare to the National Objectives Framework (NOF) bands related to ecosystem health (MfE, 2017).

This indicator includes spatial predictions for 3,802 of 3,820 lakes in New Zealand (majority of New Zealand lakes that are larger than 1 hectare), based on measurements at 61–104 lake sites (the number of sites differs by measure).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104560
Data type Table
Row count 30416
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ground-level ozone concentrations, Auckland, 2001–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2511
12
Updated
20 Nov 2019

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 20 Nov 2019.

Ground-level (tropospheric) ozone (O3) exists at a natural background level but is also produced when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds from vehicle emissions, petrol fumes, industrial processes solvents, and other human-made sources react in the presence of sunlight. It is the primary component of photochemical smog.
Ozone also occurs naturally in the stratosphere, where it protects us from ultraviolet radiation – this ozone occasionally can mix downwards to ground level.
Because sunlight and warmth are required for the chemical reactions that form ground-level ozone, peak concentrations often occur in summer when daylight hours are longer and temperatures are higher. Since the precursors for ozone can travel downwind from their sources before they react with sunlight, ozone concentrations can be high many kilometres from the precursor emissions’ sources.
Exposure to high concentrations of ozone can cause respiratory health problems and is linked to cardiovascular health problems and mortality. It can also damage vegetation.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98423
Data type Table
Row count 535064
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lake Submerged Plant Index, 1991–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International

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3463
21
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Submerged plants are good indicators of the ecological quality of lakes. Because they are attached to the bed of lakes, submerged plants are easy to observe and identify, and they are unable to move away from environmental changes. The plant species found within lakes can tell us about their level of habitat degradation and exotic weed invasion.

The file contains Lake submerged plant index scores for each sampling occasion.

Table ID 53606
Data type Table
Row count 248
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine litter 2018-2019

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1138
5
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

These data provide a snap shot of beach litter surveys submitted by Citizen Scientist ‘Monitoring Groups’ up to April, 2019. As defined by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP, 2009), marine litter is any persistent, manufactured or processed solid material discarded, disposed of, abandoned or lost in the marine and coastal environment. Marine litter washed onto beaches is one of the most obvious signs of marine pollution, and can have either land or sea-based origins. Land-based sources of marine litter include input from rivers, sewage and storm water outflows, tourism and recreation, illegal dumping, and waste disposal sites. Sea-based sources include commercial shipping, fisheries and aquaculture activities, recreational boating and offshore installations.

UNEP, 2009. Marine Litter: A Global Challenge. Nairobi: UNEP. 232 pp.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104071
Data type Table
Row count 984
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine non-indigenous species, key species, 2009 – 2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1070
1
Added
15 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 15 Oct 2019.

This data measures the presence and spread of selected non-indigenous species (key species) in New Zealand’s high risk ports and marinas each year. It also measures how far these key species have spread.

Many non-indigenous species arrive in New Zealand waters and have little impact or cannot survive; others establish and have a negative impact on our native habitats and species. Determining that a species has established depends on existing population data, expert taxonomist knowledge, and sites of detection. For example, species are only considered established if detected on natural or permanent artificial habitat (Seaward & Inglis, 2018). Established non-indigenous species can compete with, and prey on, indigenous species, modify natural habitats, and alter ecosystem processes. This can threaten marine biodiversity, our cultural and natural heritage, as well as economic activities, such as commercial and recreational fishing and boating, shellfish harvesting, and aquaculture.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104068
Data type Table
Row count 8800978
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine non-indigenous species, all species, all time

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

1238
3
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

This data measures the number of detected and established non-indigenous (non-native) species new to New Zealand each year.

Many non-indigenous species arrive in New Zealand waters and have little impact or cannot survive; others establish and have a negative impact on our native habitats and species. Determining that a species has established depends on existing population data, expert taxonomist knowledge, and sites of detection. For example, species are only considered established if detected on natural or permanent artificial habitat (Seaward & Inglis, 2018). Established non-indigenous species can compete with, and prey on, indigenous species, modify natural habitats, and alter ecosystem processes. This can threaten marine biodiversity, our cultural and natural heritage, as well as economic activities, such as commercial and recreational fishing and boating, shellfish harvesting, and aquaculture.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104061
Data type Table
Row count 377
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal and oceanic extreme waves 2008 - 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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39
8
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

Extreme wave events can damage marine ecosystems and affect coastal infrastructure, ocean-based industries, and other human activities.

Changing wave characteristics can have impacts on natural systems, as most coastal and near-shore biological communities can be damaged or destroyed by extreme wave action (Ummenhofer & Mehl, 2017). In another example, extreme waves can disrupt ferries such as those crossing the Cook Strait. Sailings are often cancelled when significant wave heights exceed six metres.

It is important to report on extreme waves to gain greater insight into their frequency, particularly as sea level and storm surges are projected to increase and can compound wave effects.

In this dataset, an extreme wave event is defined as a continuous 12-hour period during which the significant wave height equals or exceeds one of three height thresholds: four, six, or eight metres.

Four-metre-tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104060
Data type Table
Row count 793
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of indigenous marine species

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1115
9
Added
14 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2019.

We report on the conservation status and most recent change in status of indigenous (native), resident (breeds in New Zealand) marine species that have been assessed by New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS) expert panels. This includes marine mammals (dolphins, whales, seals, and sea lions), seabirds and shorebirds, sharks, rays, and chimaeras (also known as ghost sharks), and a small fraction of marine invertebrates.

Conservation status is a representation of the threat classification of resident indigenous plant and animal species. The Department of Conservation (DOC) developed the New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS) to provide a national system that is similar to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Red List.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104059
Data type Table
Row count 10942
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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