Macroinvertebrate Community Index percentiles, by monitoring site, 2009-13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5013
45
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Benthic macroinvertebrates are small animals without backbones (eg insects and worms). They live on and under submerged logs, rocks, and aquatic plants on the beds of rivers and streams during some part of their life cycle. Macroinvertebrates play a central role in stream ecosystems by feeding on periphyton (algae), macrophytes (aquatic plants), dead leaves and wood, or on each other. A high macroinvertebrate community index (MCI) indicates a high level of river health.

File contains state results for each monitored site, expressed as percentile calculations for the period 2009-2013. See Larned et al. 2015 for further details.

For more information please see:
Larned, S, Snelder, T, Unwin, M, McBride, G, Verburg, P, McMillan, H (2015).Analysis of Water Quality in New Zealand lakes and Rivers: data sources, data sets, assumptions, limitations, methods and results. NIWA Client Report no. CHC2015-033. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/DDui3u from the Ministry for the Environment dataservice.

This dataset relates to the "River water quality: Benthic macroinvertebrates" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52534
Data type Table
Row count 512
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Trends in annual maximum one–day rainfall (rx1day), 1960–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5021
8
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Trends in annual maximum one-day rainfall (rx1day), 1960–2016.
Intense rainfall can result in flash floods or land slips that damage homes and property, disrupt transportation, and endanger lives. It can also interfere with recreation and increase erosion. Changes to the frequency of intense rainfall events can alter biodiversity.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89433
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Economic performance of the agriculture industry - Real agricultural GDP, 1978-2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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5016
19
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Data on the economic performance of the agriculture industry describes agriculture’s contribution to the New Zealand economy. It provides supporting information for the land, atmosphere and climate, and freshwater domains.

This dataset relates to the "Economic performance of the agriculture industry" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52492
Data type Table
Row count 146
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lightning Trends, 2001–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5020
4
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Lightning is the discharge of electricity from thunderstorms and can occur within a cloud, between clouds, or between a cloud and the ground. By international standards, lightning does not occur frequently around New Zealand. However, ground strikes can injure or kill people and livestock, damage property and infrastructure, and, although rarely in New Zealand, spark forest fires. Thunderstorms are often associated with other severe weather events, such as strong wind gusts and hail. Thunderstorms may increase in frequency and intensity with climate change.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89427
Data type Table
Row count 1
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Influenza like illness weekly consultation rates, 2000–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5013
9
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Influenza is a potentially life-threatening virus that spreads quickly from person to person. It is a significant public health issue in this country, with 10–20 percent of New Zealanders infected every year. While influenza can occur all year round, incidence generally peaks in winter and spring in New Zealand. Some studies suggest this is because the virus can survive longer outside the body in periods of colder weather and low humidity (dry conditions).
Influenza infections may decline as our climate changes. Warmer projected temperatures and higher humidity during winter and spring may contribute to reduced annual influenza rates. However, influenza infection is also affected by factors besides temperature and humidity.
These data are reported in an annual surveillance report by the Institute of Environmental Science and Research. See the 2015 report for more information (Institute of Environmental Science and Research, 2016).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89456
Data type Table
Row count 374
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily peak UV index values, Invercargill, Leigh, Lauder, Paraparaumu and Christchurch (1981–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4948
22
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Too much exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation can cause skin cancer. Ozone absorbs some UV radiation, and UV levels can vary in relation to changes in atmospheric ozone. Monitoring UV levels can help us understand current skin cancer risk.
The Lauder spectroradiometer (UVM dataset) data are used to assure the reliability of broad-band erythermal UV (RB dataset) from five sites. Measurements supplied are daily peak, noon-time mean, and total daily dose of erythemal (skin-reddening) UV.
Further information can be found in:
Liley, B, Querel, B, & McKenzie, R (2014). Measurements of Ozone and UV for New Zealand. Prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, Wellington. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/LoPyPo on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "UV intensity" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52584
Data type Table
Row count 60760
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Daily peak UV index value, 1981–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4941
28
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Daily peak UV index values at Invercargill, Lauder (Otago region), Christchurch, Paraparaumu (Wellington region), and Leigh (Auckland region). The strength of UV light is expressed as a solar UV index, starting from 0 (no UV) to 11+ (extreme).
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light helps our bodies make vitamin D, which we need for healthy bones and muscles. However, too much exposure to UV light can cause skin cancer. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, and monitoring UV levels helps us understand the occurrence of skin cancer.
Ozone in the upper atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s UV light, protecting us from harmful levels. The amount of UV radiation reaching the ground varies in relation to changes in the atmospheric ozone concentrations. The Antarctic ozone hole lies well to the south of New Zealand and does not have a large effect on New Zealand’s ozone concentrations.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89468
Data type Table
Row count 38993
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated long-term soil erosion - Average volume of soil erosion, by region, 2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4971
34
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Soil erosion reduces the productive capacity of land. Sediment entering waterways affects water quality, storage capacity, and biodiversity. Soil erosion in the North Island is primarily due to the historical clearance of forest on steep slopes for pastoral agriculture. South Island soil erosion is primarily due to high rainfall and steep mountainous terrain.

Column headings:
vol_tkm2yr = volume of soil lost per year measured in tonnes per square kilometer

This dataset relates to the "Estimated long-term soil erosion" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52483
Data type Table
Row count 17
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Oceanic sea surface temperature trends, 1993–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4994
7
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

We used NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive, which is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately six-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom & Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.
Our data extends from about 30°S to 55°S, and from 160°E to 170°W and is grouped into five areas: the exclusive economic zone (EEZ), the Chatham Rise, northern subtropical waters, subantarctic waters, and the Tasman Sea.
Trend direction was assessed using the Theil-Sen estimator and the Two One-Sided Test (TOST) for equivalence at the 95% confidence level.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89407
Data type Table
Row count 4
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal water quality_all results by site

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4939
18
Added
28 Jun 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Jun 2017.

Table ID 53632
Data type Table
Row count 371
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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