Wildfire risk, 1997 - 2019, trend

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3742
23
Added
14 Oct 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2020.

DATA SOURCE: National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)
[Technical report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti... and www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti...]

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Wildfire indicator [available at www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/wildfire-risk]

This indicator measures fire danger using the New Zealand Fire Danger Rating at 30 sites around New Zealand from 1997 to 2019, although not all sites start at 1997. We report on the number of days per year with ‘very high and extreme’ (VH+E) fire danger for each of these sites, and trends over time.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 105047
Data type Table
Row count 56
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ocean acidification, Munida, state 1998 - 2020

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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934
5
Added
18 Aug 2022

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Aug 2022.

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Stats NZ to provide for environmental reporting transparency. Dataset used to develop the "Ocean acidification" indicator (available at  www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/ocean-acidification).

This data set measures the change in pH in subantarctic surface waters at a station east of Otago from 1998 to 2020.

Ocean acidification describes the long-term decrease in the pH of our oceans and coastal waters. This indicator measures:

  • change in pH, acidity and pCO2 (a measure of dissolved carbon dioxide) in New Zealand’s subantarctic surface waters (Munida Transect) from 1998 to 2020.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 110170
Data type Table
Row count 1088
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality, trend, 1999-2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5079
45
Added
07 Apr 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 07 Apr 2020.

This indicator measures groundwater quality in New Zealand’s aquifers and how it is changing over time, based on measurements made at monitored sites. We report on nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, chloride, conductivity and Escherichia coli (E. coli) including:

  • trends in concentrations for 10-year (2009–18) and 20-year (1999–2018) periods.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104571
Data type Table
Row count 1699
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual glacier ice volumes, 1977–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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9708
72
Added
16 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2017.

A glacier is a body of slow-moving ice, at least 1 hectare in area that has persisted for two decades or longer. New Zealand has 3,144 glaciers. Most are located along the Southern Alps on the South Island, although Mount Ruapehu on the North Island supports 18 glaciers. New Zealand’s large glaciers are noteworthy for their large debris cover. The exceptions, Franz Joseph and Fox glaciers, are rare examples of glaciers that terminate in a rainforest.
Glacier volume is strongly influenced by climate factors, such as temperature and precipitation, which scientists expect to be affected by the warming climate. Glacial ice is an important water resource. Changes to ice storage and melting can affect ecological and hydropower resources downstream, as well as important cultural values and tourism.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89472
Data type Table
Row count 40
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual average Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation Index (1871–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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10375
99
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) describes the long-term oscillation of the Pacific Ocean. The Pacific climate oscillation causes climate fluctuations that can influence New Zealand’s climate. For example, it can affect the strength and frequency of El Niño and La Niña events. In New Zealand, the positive phase of the IPO is linked to stronger west to southwest winds and more rain to the west. Such climate phases can impact on our environment, industries, and recreational activities.
The IPO is similar, and nearly equivalent, to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The PDO is a predictor of the impact of the climate oscillation in the northern Pacific.
This dataset relates to the "Inter-decadal Pacific oscillation" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52591
Data type Table
Row count 143
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of indigenous freshwater species

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3656
21
Added
07 Apr 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 07 Apr 2020.

We report on the conservation status and most recent change in status of indigenous (native), resident (breeds in New Zealand) freshwater fish and invertebrates that have been assessed by New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS) expert panels.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104574
Data type Table
Row count 11835
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater pesticides survey, 2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7312
19
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Pesticides, which include insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and plant growth regulators, are commonly used in New Zealand to control insects, diseases and weeds in primary industries such as agricultural farming, forestry and horticulture. Once applied to land or crops, pesticides can make their way through soil and enter groundwater systems.

File contains whether a pesticide was detected at monitored wells, and if so, what the concentration is. File also includes surrounding land use, well use, well diameter, well depth, and screen depth, where available.

Table ID 53605
Data type Table
Row count 153
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ground-level ozone concentrations, 2005-2021

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1937
14
Added
13 Oct 2021

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2021.

Ground-level (tropospheric) ozone (O3) exists at a natural background level but is also produced when nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds from vehicle emissions, petrol fumes, industrial processes solvents, and other human-made sources react in the presence of heat and sunlight. It is the primary component of photochemical smog. Ozone also occurs naturally in the stratosphere, where it protects us from ultraviolet radiation – this ozone occasionally can mix downwards to ground level.

Ozone is a colourless, odourless gas. Exposure to high concentrations of ozone can cause respiratory health problems and is linked to cardiovascular health problems and increased mortality. Those most at risk include people with asthma, children, older adults, and people who are active outdoors, such as outdoor workers. People with certain genetic characteristics and nutrient deficiencies are also at greater risk from ozone exposure. Ozone can also affect sensitive vegetation and ecosystems and can cause damage during the growing season.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 106268
Data type Table
Row count 167533
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions detailed data, 1990 and 2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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8244
59
Added
13 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 13 Oct 2017.

Detailed New Zealand greenhouse gas emissions data for 1990 and 2015 for Energy and Agriculture sectors. Data are sourced from the 1990–2015 New Zealand Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory. Includes sub–sub–sector data. Emissions are in kt and have not been standardised by conversion to CO2 equivalents. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster. Reducing emissions of CH4 and N2O will decrease concentrations in the atmosphere more quickly.Greenhouse gases (GHGs) absorb heat from Earth’s surface, warming the atmosphere and changing our climate. New Zealand’s share of GHG emissions is very small, but our gross emissions per person are high. Emissions mainly come from combustion of fossil fuels that emit carbon dioxide (CO2), and agriculture which emits methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere much longer than other major GHGs. Because of this, today’s global CO2 emissions will continue to influence atmospheric CO2 concentrations for a very long time. Methane and N2O trap heat better than CO2 but leave the atmosphere faster.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89430
Data type Table
Row count 210
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated contemporary and pre-human wetland area, by type (2008 estimate)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7319
51
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Wetlands support unique biodiversity and provide important services. They clean water of excess nutrients and sediment, help absorb floodwaters, and act as carbon sinks (remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere). They also have cultural importance for Māori, and provide valuable food and materials (eg flax). Draining wetlands for agricultural and urban development over the past 150 years has significantly reduced their extent, leading to a loss of biodiversity and natural function. This dataset contains estimates of the national extent of the different types of wetlands in contempary and pre-human times.

This dataset relates to the "Wetland extent" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52541
Data type Table
Row count 14
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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