Shark catch use (2003–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7923
42
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

New Zealand waters have at least 117 species of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, and other cartilaginous fish species). They are particularly vulnerable to overfishing because they are long-lived, mature slowly, and have a low reproductive rate. Chondrichthyans are important for healthy ocean ecosystems, and reporting their commercial catch and bycatch helps us understand the sustainability of our fisheries.

Table ID 53482
Data type Table
Row count 52
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Monthly average peak UV index value, 1981–2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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11713
47
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Monthly average peak UV index values at Invercargill, Lauder (Otago region), Christchurch, Paraparaumu (Wellington region), and Leigh (Auckland region). The strength of UV light is expressed as a solar UV index, starting from 0 (no UV) to 11+ (extreme).
Exposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light helps our bodies make vitamin D, which we need for healthy bones and muscles. However, too much exposure to UV light can cause skin cancer. New Zealand has naturally high UV levels, and monitoring UV levels helps us understand the occurrence of skin cancer.
Ozone in the upper atmosphere absorbs some of the sun’s UV light, protecting us from harmful levels. The amount of UV radiation reaching the ground varies in relation to changes in the atmospheric ozone concentrations. The Antarctic ozone hole lies well to the south of New Zealand and does not have a large effect on New Zealand’s ozone concentrations.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89467
Data type Table
Row count 65
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Global and New Zealand temperatures, five year running average (1911–2010)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7338
47
Added
01 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Oct 2015.

Temperature change is influenced by changes in atmospheric composition that result from greenhouse gas emissions. It is also linked to atmospheric circulation changes (eg the El Niño southern oscillation). It can have a significant effect on agriculture, energy demand, and recreation. The primary aim of the datasets is to provide a tool to show average New Zealand and global temperatures compared to a reference temperature in order to compare this with expected global climate change in response to mechanisms such as atmospheric carbon dioxide, volcanic aerosols, and solar irradiance changes. Further information can be found in:
Tait, A, Macara, G, & Paul, V. (2014) Preparation of climate datasets for the 2015 Environmental Synthesis Report: Temperature, Rainfall, Wind, Sunshine and Soil Moisture. Prepared for Ministry for the Environment. Available at data.mfe.govt.nz/x/Fwn9AL on the Ministry for the Environment dataservice (data.mfe.govt.nz/).
This dataset relates to the "National temperature time series" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52573
Data type Table
Row count 929
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Irrigated land, clean, 2002 - 2019

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2363
14
Added
14 Apr 2021

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Apr 2021.

DATA SOURCE: Statistics New Zealand, Agriculture Production Survey (APS)

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Irrigated land" indicator [available at www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/irrigated-land]

This indicator measures the total irrigated agricultural land area across New Zealand for 2002, 2017 and 2019. We report on total irrigated land area on farms earnings over $60,000 a year by region and dominant farm type. In 2017 and 2019 we also report on total irrigated land by land use and irrigation system.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 105408
Data type Table
Row count 4978
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Groundwater quality, state, 2014-18

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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2918
28
Updated
11 Jun 2021

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 11 Jun 2021.

11 June 2021: A revised version of this dataset has been published to correct the terminology used to compare nitrate-nitrogen values to the 3 g/m3 guideline value. The field name has been changed from “reference_condition” to “n_n_guideline”, and values in this field will now be either “Does not exceed” or “Exceeds”, instead of “Meets” or “Does not meet”.

20 July 2020: We corrected the data about drinking water standards for E. coli and nitrate-nitrogen in the key findings for groundwater quality.

For the five-year period 2014‒2018:

  • 68 percent of 364 sites failed to meet the E.coli drinking water standards (changed from 98 percent of 145 sites failed to meet the E. coli drinking water standards)
  • 19 percent of 433 sites didn’t meet nitrate-nitrogen standards (changed from 28 percent of 403 sites failed to meet the nitrate-nitrogen drinking water standards).

This indicator measures groundwater quality in New Zealand’s aquifers and how it is changing over time, based on measurements made at monitored sites. We report on nitrate-nitrogen, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, chloride, conductivity and Escherichia coli (E. coli) including:

  • median values for the period 2014–18
  • nitrate-nitrogen median values compared to a guideline value of 3 grams per cubic metre (g/m3). This value is defined as a concentration that indicates groundwater has been influenced by industrialised agriculture and is highly likely to have been impacted by human activity (per Morgenstern & Daughney, 2012 and Daughney & Reeves, 2005).
  • the proportion of samples from each site that have concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen or E. coli in excess of the Maximum Acceptable Values for protection of human health (Ministry of Health, 2018).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104569
Data type Table
Row count 14644
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Mean, maximum and minimum coastal sea surface temperature (1953–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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10011
141
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Coastal sea-surface temperature is influenced by solar heating and cooling, latitude, and local geography. It is hard for some marine species to survive when the sea temperature changes. This can affect marine ecosystems and processes. It can also affect fish-farming industries based in our coastal areas.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52524
Data type Table
Row count 33
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ozone hole, 1979–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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9162
89
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Ozone is a gas that forms a naturally occurring layer in the upper atmosphere (stratosphere), protecting Earth from the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) light. The ozone hole is an area of reduced stratospheric ozone. It forms in spring over Antarctica because of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) produced from human activities. The ozone hole has started to shrink due to the phase-out of ODSs, and it is possible that it will cease to form by the middle of this century.
The ozone hole does not have a large effect on the concentration of ozone over New Zealand. However, when the ozone hole breaks up in spring, it can send ‘plumes’ of ozone-depleted air over New Zealand. Reporting on the state of the ozone hole helps us understand the state of ozone concentrations globally.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89466
Data type Table
Row count 37
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Health impacts of PM10, 2006 & 2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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8179
17
Added
17 Oct 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Oct 2018.

PM10 (particulate matter less than 10 micrometres in diameter) comprises solid and liquid particles in the air. PM10 can be inhaled and the largest particles in this size fraction are deposited in the upper airways, while the smaller ones can deposit deep in the lungs. Children, the elderly, and people with existing heart or lung problems have a higher risk of health effects from PM10 exposure. Health effects include decreased lung function or heart attack, and mortality.
We report on the modelled number of premature deaths for adults (30+ years), hospitalisations, and restricted activity days for people of all ages for years 2006 and 2016 only. The model only includes impacts that result from exposure to PM10 that comes from human activities.
We focus on PM10 from human activities because these sources can be managed, unlike PM from natural sources such as sea salt.
• Premature deaths are those, often preventable, occurring before a person reaches the age they could be expected to live to.
• Hospitalisations relate to those for respiratory and cardiac illnesses (not including cases leading to premature death).
• Restricted activity days occur when symptoms are sufficient to limit usual activities such as work or study. These days aren’t shared evenly across the population – people with asthma or other respiratory conditions would likely have more restricted activity days.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 98462
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Land cover, 1996 to 2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3474
58
Added
14 Apr 2021

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Apr 2021.

DATA SOURCE: Manaaki Whenua - Landcare Research

[Main dataset and further metadata can be found at lris.scinfo.org.nz/layer/104400-lcdb-v50-land-cove...]

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

Dataset used to develop the "Urban land cover" "Exotic land cover" and "Indigenous land cover" indicators [available at www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/urban-land-cover, www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/exotic-land-cover, www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/indigenous-land-cover]

For lcdb50_change

As there are over ~ 1 million rows to this dataset, a 32-bit version of Microsoft Excel __may not fully display/download all rows. A DBMS, statistical or GIS application may be needed to view the entire dataset__.

This indicator measures urban, exotic, and indigenous land cover area in New Zealand from 1996 to 2018.

Urban, exotic, and indigenous land cover are derived from the LAWA (Land Air Water Aotearoa) land categories. Urban land cover includes urban area comprising built-up area /settlement and urban parkland /open space and artificial bare surfaces which includes transport infrastructure and surface mine or dump. Exotic land cover includes exotic forest, exotic scrub/shrubland, exotic grassland and cropping and horticulture. Indigenous land cover includes indigenous forest, indigenous scrub/shrubland, tussock grassland, natural bare/lightly vegetated surfaces, and other herbaceous vegetation. Data is from the New Zealand Land Cover Data Base (LCDB5). We report on urban, exotic, and indigenous land cover area, and net change in urban, exotic, and indigenous land cover area, for New Zealand and by region. We also report on specific urban, exotic, and indigenous land cover classes.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 105422
Data type Table
Row count 5160760
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Annual glacier ice volumes, 1978 - 2020

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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714
5
Added
11 Aug 2022

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Aug 2022.

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency. Dataset used to develop the "Annual glacier ice volumes" indicator (available at www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/annual-glacier-ice-vo...).

This dataset measures the total volume of ice in glaciers greater than one hectare in area throughout New Zealand between 1978 and 2020.

Glaciers are iconic indicators of climate change (Mackintosh et al., 2017). Glacier fluctuations are amongst the clearest signals of climate change because glaciers are highly sensitive indicators of the earth’s surface energy balance (Chinn, 1996). The amount of loss seen in two recent extreme mass-loss events for New Zealand glaciers was more likely to have occurred due to anthropogenic climate change (Vargo et al., 2020).

Glaciers provide an important natural resource that supports power generation, primary production, and water resources. Glaciers act as a reservoir of water and are vital for plants and animals dependent on downstream rivers and lakes, particularly throughout drier seasons. Glaciers regulate downstream water temperature, which is important for many aquatic species, including Taonga species. Changes to ice storage and melting can affect ecological and hydropower resources downstream, as well as important cultural values and tourism. Melting glaciers also add to coastal sea level rise, further contributing to the impacts of climate change.

Climate change is causing summer snowlines to rise and glaciers to retreat. A recent survey of all glacier ice in New Zealand found that the North Island glaciers had declined in area by 25 percent since 1988. For glaciers situated close to the limits of where they can exist, like those on Mt Ruapehu (the only North Island glacierised site today), even moderate warming scenarios predicted for the coming decades may lead to their extinction (Eaves & Brook, 2020). Mt Ruapehu is in the Tongariro National Park, which has been awarded UNESCO World Heritage status for its cultural and natural values. Ruapehu’s glaciers serve as a cultural reference point for local iwi. For example, the Whangaehu River, which has been recognised as indivisible and a living being, emerges from the Whangaehu Glacier on the east flank of Mt Ruapehu. The loss of glaciers will have a negative impact on culture and historical kōrero.

Between 1978 and 2020 the total volume of glacial ice in New Zealand decreased by 35 percent and the rate of annual loss increased.

The total volume of ice in glaciers in New Zealand decreased from 53.3km3 in 1978 to 34.6km3 in 2020.

The highest annual ice loss occurred in 2018 with 2.7km3 lost. The second highest annual ice loss occurred in both 2019 and 2011, with 2.5km3 lost.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf. Summary report available at environment.govt.nz/publications/environment-aotea....

References

Chinn, T. J. (1996). New Zealand glacier responses to climate change of the past century. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, 39(3), 415–428. ++doi.org/10.1080/00288306.1996.9514723++

Eaves, S. R., & Brook, M. S. (2020). Glaciers and glaciation of North Island, New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, 64(1), 1–20. ++doi.org/10.1080/00288306.2020.1811354++

Mackintosh, A. N., Anderson, B. M., Lorrey, A. M., Renwick, J. A., Frei, P., & Dean, S. M. (2017). Regional cooling caused recent New Zealand glacier advances in a period of global warming. Nature Communications, 8(1). ++doi.org/10.1038/ncomms14202++

Vargo, L. J., Anderson, B. M., Dadić, R., Horgan, H. J., Mackintosh, A. N., King, A. D., & Lorrey, A. M. (2020). Anthropogenic warming forces extreme annual glacier mass loss. Nature Climate Change, 10(9), 856–861. ++doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-0849-2++

Table ID 109668
Data type Table
Row count 43
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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