Daily temperature, 1909 - 2019

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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5313
267
Added
14 Oct 2020

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2020.

DATA SOURCE: National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)
[Technical report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti...]

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency

This lowest aggregation dataset, was used to develop three ‘Our Atmosphere and Climate’ indicators. See Statistics New Zealand indicator links for specific methodologies and state/trend datasets (see ‘Shiny App’ downloads).
1) Temperature (www.stats.govt.nz/ndicators/temperature)
2) First and last frost days (www.stats.govt.nz/ndicators/frost-and-warm-days)
3) Growing degree days (www.stats.govt.nz/ndicators/growing-degree-days)

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
Due to the size of this dataset (111 MB), a 32-bit version of Microsoft Excel will only display/download ~ 1 million rows. A DBMS, statistical or GIS application is needed to view the entire dataset.

This dataset shows two measures of temperature change in New Zealand: New Zealand’s national temperature from NIWA’s ‘seven-station’ temperature series from 1909 to 2019, and temperature at 30 sites around the country from at least 1972 to 2019. For national temperature, we report daily average, minimum and maximum temperatures. We also present New Zealand national and global temperature anomalies.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 105056
Data type Table
Row count 2049471
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

On-road Transport Emissions by Pollutant

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7818
50
Added
01 Dec 2014

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 01 Dec 2014.

Source: National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research

Table ID 52127
Data type Table
Row count 12
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Area of seabed trawled by depth class (1990–2011)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6938
13
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging (where fishing gear is towed near or along the ocean floor) can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. These fishing methods can also stir up sediment from the seabed, creating sediment plumes that can smother sensitive species. Recovery times for affected habitats and species depend on their sensitivity and the area affected by trawling or dredging. Bottom trawling is carried out on or near the seabed in both shallow and deep waters. Dredging is carried out on the seabed in shallow waters and targets marine creatures such as scallops. This measure focuses on deepwater areas (waters deeper than 200m).

Table ID 53486
Data type Table
Row count 4
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Area of coastal seabed trawled by depth class (2008–12)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6864
14
Added
25 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging, when fishing nets or dredges are towed near and along the seabed, can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed, shading (in shallow waters) or smothering marine species. This measure focuses on coastal areas (waters shallower than 250m). Focusing on coastal benthic habitats is important as these face multiple threats (for example from land-based activities) in addition to fishing.

Table ID 53510
Data type Table
Row count 3
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Agricultural and horticultural land use, 2002–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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11350
326
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Dominant land uses in New Zealand include conservation (eg national and forestry parks), forestry (eg for timber resources/wood supply), urban (eg built up areas and open parkland), and agriculture and horticulture. Each land use places different pressures on the land and on receiving environments such as waterways. These pressures can be both positive (eg increased productivity) and negative (eg biodiversity loss and reduced functioning of ecosystems).

This measure reports on agricultural and horticultural land uses by region.

Table ID 95343
Data type Table
Row count 620
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Wetland area, 1996 - 2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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510
7
Added
11 Aug 2022

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Aug 2022.

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency. Dataset used to develop the "Wetland area" indicator (available at www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/wetland-area).

This dataset measures change in wetland area in New Zealand from 1996 to 2018. We report on net change in wetland area for New Zealand and by region. When a wetland is lost or gained, we also show how the underlying landcover might have changed as this can provide insights into what is causing the loss or gain in wetlands.

Wetlands are taonga, supporting high levels of biodiversity, and contribute vital ecological functions. They provide habitat and breeding grounds for taonga species including indigenous invertebrates, plants, fish (for example, kōkopu and tuna (eels)), and bird species (for example, mātātā (fernbird)), many of which live only in wetlands. Wetlands act as ‘kidneys’ and giant sponges – they clean the water of excess nutrients and sediment, control flood water and pollutants, and act as carbon sinks (removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere). Wetlands have strong cultural, economic, and spiritual importance for Māori. They are a key source of mātauranga (knowledge), material and resources for mahinga kai (traditional food resources), rongoā (traditional Māori medicine), raranga (weaving), and whakairo (carving).

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf. Summary report available at environment.govt.nz/publications/environment-aotea....

Table ID 109678
Data type Table
Row count 211672
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

River water quality: Clarity and turbidity, state, 2016 - 2020

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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385
6
Added
11 Aug 2022

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Aug 2022.

Adapted by Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand to provide for environmental reporting transparency. Dataset used to develop the "River water quality: clarity and turbidity" indicator (available at www.stats.govt.nz/indicators/river-water-quality-c...).

This dataset contains two parameters of water quality based on measurements made at monitored river sites:

  • Clarity
  • Turbidity

Clarity and turbidity in river waters is one of five parameters that provide an overview of New Zealand’s river water quality and how it is changing over time.

This dataset includes:

  • clarity and turbidity as measured median values at monitored sites for New Zealand’s river length for the period 2016–2020
  • how these values compare to the default guideline values in the Australian and New Zealand guidelines for fresh and marine water quality (ANZG, 2018), which indicates the risk of environmental impairment
  • measured visual clarity median values compared with the National Objectives Framework (NOF) bands related to ecosystem health (MfE, 2020)

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at environment.govt.nz/publications/environment-aotea....

Table ID 109665
Data type Table
Row count 15864
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Growing degree days annual growing season averages and totals, 1972/3–2015/6

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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9597
39
Added
12 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Oct 2017.

Growing degree days (GDD) measures the amount of warmth available for plant and insect growth and can be used to predict when flowers will bloom and crops and insects will mature. GDD counts the total number of degrees Celsius each day is above a threshold temperature. In this report we used 10 degrees Celsius. Increased GDD means that plants and insects reach maturity faster, provided that other conditions necessary for growth are favourable, such as sufficient moisture and nutrients. As a measure of temperature, GDD experiences short-term changes in response to climate variations, such as El Niño, and in the longer-term is affected by our warming climate.
This dataset gives the average number of GDD over growing seasons (July 1 – June 30 of the following year) for New Zealand, the North and South Islands, and for all 30 sites.
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89393
Data type Table
Row count 1389
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Highly erodible land 2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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7332
29
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

The data identifies five classes of land in New Zealand at risk of erosion:

  1. high landslide risk – delivery to stream
  2. high landslide risk – non-delivery to steam
  3. moderate earthflow risk
  4. severe earthflow risk
  5. gully risk

Landslide erosion is the shallow (approximately 1m) and sudden failure of soil slopes during storm rainfall. Earthflow erosion is the slow downward movement (approximately 1m/year) of wet soil slopes towards waterways. Gully erosion is massive soil erosion that begins at gully heads and expands up hillsides over decadal time scales.

Erosion can have negative consequences on land productivity, water quality (via increased sedimentation and turbidity), the natural form of the land, and infrastructure.

New Zealand experiences high rates of soil erosion. In the North Island, this is mostly due to the historical clearance of forest for agriculture (see also Estimated long-term soil erosion). In contrast, erosion in the South Island is mostly due to natural processes, primarily high rainfall and steep mountain slopes.

It is important to identify areas of land at risk of severe erosion to inform land-use decisions and help prioritise regional soil conservation work.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 99877
Data type Table
Row count 240
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Land cover, 1996–2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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9112
67
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

Land cover describes the extent of vegetation, water bodies, built environments, and bare natural surfaces (eg gravel and rock) across New Zealand. Measuring the composition of and changes in land cover can help us understand the pressures that different land uses are placing on the biodiversity and functioning of ecosystems.

This measure reports on land cover by class, regional council area, and year.

For more information on the Landcover Database please refer to: lris.scinfo.org.nz/layer/48423-lcdb-v41-land-cover...

Table ID 95348
Data type Table
Row count 3316
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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