Estimated contemporary and pre-human wetland area, by region (2008 estimate)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3023
51
Added
07 Oct 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 07 Oct 2015.

Wetlands support unique biodiversity and provide important services. They clean water of excess nutrients and sediment, help absorb floodwaters, and act as carbon sinks (remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere). They also have cultural importance for Māori, and provide valuable food and materials (eg flax). Draining wetlands for agricultural and urban development over the past 150 years has significantly reduced their extent, leading to a loss of biodiversity and natural function. This dataset contains estimates of the extent of wetlands in pre-human and contemporary times by regional council area, and nationally.

This dataset relates to the "Wetland extent" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52593
Data type Table
Row count 34
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated forest carbon stocks - Forest carbon stocks, 1990–2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2920
20
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand’s indigenous and exotic forests absorb and store carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis. As forests grow, the carbon stored in them increases. These carbon stocks help offset greenhouse gas emissions from sources such as agriculture, energy production, and transport.

Column headings:
type = vegetation type of forest
vol_tC = volume of carbon in tonnes

This dataset relates to the "Estimated forest carbon stocks" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52475
Data type Table
Row count 69
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Acidity (pH) of subantarctic waters east of New Zealand (1998–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2738
25
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Ocean acidification, measured by the reduction in sea water pH, is mainly caused by oceans absorbing and storing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Ocean acidification affects marine species in various ways. The growth and survival rates of some shell-building species are affected because they struggle to build their shells. The behaviour and physiology of some fish is also affected. This could influence marine ecosystems and commercial, customary, and recreational fishing or harvesting.
This dataset relates to the "Ocean acidification" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52522
Data type Table
Row count 588
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths (1921–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3122
36
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

The Hector’s and Māui dolphins are subspecies of the small dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori. These coastal dolphins are endemic to New Zealand (not found anywhere else). Māui dolphins are found on the west coast of the North Island, most often between Maunganui Bluff, north of Dargaville, and New Plymouth. Hector’s dolphins are mostly found around the South Island. Both subspecies are threatened with extinction. The Hector’s dolphin is classified as nationally endangered, while the Māui dolphin is nationally critical. Dolphins can become entangled in fishing gear used by both commercial and recreational fishers, with set nets posing a particularly high risk. Reporting the bycatch of protected species helps us understand the pressures our protected marine species face from fishing.
We report on two aspects of Hector’s and Māui dolphin deaths based on data extracted from the Department of Conservation (DOC) Incident Database for 1921–2015: the number of dolphin deaths by cause of death, including a comparison of deaths over 1996–2015; and the number of dolphin deaths from entanglement by type of fishing gear.

Table ID 53475
Data type Table
Row count 561
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Heavy metal exceedances in estuarine and coastal sediment (2010–14)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2815
40
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Heavy metals occur naturally in estuaries, but high concentrations suggest contamination from another source. The metals can be transported along waterways from urban environments (and, for cadmium, from farmland) and accumulate in estuarine and coastal sediments. They are toxic and accumulate in fish and shellfish. We focus on four heavy metals: lead, copper, zinc, and cadmium.
This dataset relates to the "Heavy metal load in sediment" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52509
Data type Table
Row count 375
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Fishing effort (number of dredge tows) by year (1990–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2670
38
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Seabed trawling is the practice of towing fishing nets near or along the ocean floor. The towing process can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed. This creates sediment plumes that change light conditions. This can affect marine species (for example by limiting their capacity to generate energy through photosynthesis) and smother sensitive species.
This dataset relates to the "Commercial seabed trawling and dredging" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52505
Data type Table
Row count 50
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

PM10 composed of sea salt and soil

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2469
15
Added
16 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Sep 2015.

We measure the annual concentrations and proportions of natural and anthropogenic particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10). PM10 in the air comprises solid particles and liquid droplets from both natural and human-made sources.

PM10 occurs naturally, for example, as sea salt, dust (airborne soil), or pollen. Airborne soil particles, although natural, are also produced by human-made processes such as construction and industrial activities. Natural particulates can make up a large portion of PM10 in some areas.

Research on the health effects of natural particulate matter is inconclusive, and the World Health Organization (WHO) considers all particulate matter of a certain size to be of equal toxicity. Natural particulates are generally in the PM2.5 to PM10 size range, which typically has less harmful health effects than smaller particles.

This dataset relates to the "Natural particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter (PM10)" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52441
Data type Table
Row count 48
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

New Zealand’s marine economy (2007–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2841
20
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

The marine economy shows the contribution marine-based economic activities make to the New Zealand economy as measured by gross domestic product (GDP). Measuring the marine economy shows how New Zealand’s marine environment is used to generate economic activity and how this changes over time. However, these activities can also be a source of pressure on New Zealand’s marine environment.

Table ID 53489
Data type Table
Row count 273
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Economic performance of the agriculture industry - Real agricultural GDP, 1978-2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2908
15
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Data on the economic performance of the agriculture industry describes agriculture’s contribution to the New Zealand economy. It provides supporting information for the land, atmosphere and climate, and freshwater domains.

This dataset relates to the "Economic performance of the agriculture industry" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52492
Data type Table
Row count 146
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Estimated contemporary and pre-human wetland area, by type (2008 estimate)

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

2839
29
Added
29 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 29 Sep 2015.

Wetlands support unique biodiversity and provide important services. They clean water of excess nutrients and sediment, help absorb floodwaters, and act as carbon sinks (remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere). They also have cultural importance for Māori, and provide valuable food and materials (eg flax). Draining wetlands for agricultural and urban development over the past 150 years has significantly reduced their extent, leading to a loss of biodiversity and natural function. This dataset contains estimates of the national extent of the different types of wetlands in contempary and pre-human times.

This dataset relates to the "Wetland extent" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52541
Data type Table
Row count 14
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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