Location and extent of NZ's aquifers, 2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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10180
213
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"A unit of rock or sediment is called an aquifer when it can yield a usable quantity of water.
Aquifers may occur at different depths in the same location. The map shows the areas of New Zealand’s land surface above one or more aquifers. The aquifer boundaries were described by White (2001), and some boundaries were updated by Moreau and Bekele (2015), using information provided by regional councils and from Lovett and Cameron (2015). The map has 153 polygons (aquifer outlines), some of which have more than one aquifer.
Methods for defining aquifer boundaries generally rely on knowing the locations and characteristics of productive wells, and using geological maps to identify water–bearing materials. In many cases, these boundaries are also influenced by management attributes such as regional or property boundaries, and surface water catchments (Lovett & Cameron, 2015).
This dataset relates to the ""Location and area of New Zealand’s aquifers"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.
"

Layer ID 52675
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 153
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Livestock numbers grid APS 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4042
44
Added
17 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Apr 2019.

The shapefile provides counts and densities of livestock numbers within a hexagonal grid from data derived from the Agricultural Production Survey census final results for 2017.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 99906
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 963
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Land cover database v4 0 class orders

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

8820
266
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

"Land cover describes the extent of vegetation, water bodies, built environments, and bare natural surfaces (eg gravel and rock) across New Zealand. Measuring the composition and changes in land cover can help us understand the pressures that different land uses are placing on the biodiversity and functioning of ecosystems.

This data set relates to the "Land cover" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 52764
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 479353
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Nitrogen leaching, 2011

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4655
60
Added
09 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 09 Feb 2016.

"Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth. It occurs naturally, but in agricultural systems more nitrogen is commonly added to soils as fertiliser or from livestock waste. Not all the additional nitrogen can be taken up by plants. Some nitrogen will drain (leach) as nitrate from the soil and can enter waterways, potentially causing ecological harm. The amount of nitrate leaching from the soil varies around the country, as a result of different land uses, climates, and soils.
This dataset relates to the ""Geographic pattern of agricultural nitrate leaching"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website. "

Layer ID 52850
Data type Grid
Resolution 100.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lake water quality, 2009–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7277
68
Added
17 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 17 Feb 2016.

"The Lake Trophic Level Index (TLI) characterises the life supporting capacity of a lake based on nutrient enrichment. In general, the higher the TLI score, the poorer the water quality in the lake. Lakes with extremely poor quality are rarely suitable for recreation and provide poor quality habitat for aquatic species.
Care should be taken when interpreting these results. Monitored lakes consist of about 4 percent of all New Zealand lakes, and programmes may focus on those that have poor water quality or are at risk due to the type of land use in their catchment.
After checking for data consistency, the lakes considered suitable for national comparison are sparsely and unevenly distributed, with gaps in the Manawatu, Taranaki, Tasman, Marlborough, Otago, and West Coast regions. The lakes considered in the analysis are located mainly in Northland, Bay of Plenty, Hawke’s Bay, and Canterbury.
This dataset relates to the ""Lake water quality: trophic level index"" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.
"

Layer ID 53310
Data type Vector point
Feature count 86
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Erosion risk North Island 2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7789
103
Added
12 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Feb 2016.

"This data records estimated erosion risk for different areas in the North Island.

New Zealand experiences high rates of soil erosion. In the North Island, this is mostly due to the historical clearance of forest for agriculture (see also Estimated long-term soil erosion). In contrast, erosion in the South Island is mostly due to natural processes, primarily high rainfall and steep mountain slopes.
Highly erodible land comprises land at risk of landsliding, gullying, or earthflow erosion if it does not have protective woody vegetation (Dymond et al, 2006). Landsliding occurs on steep slopes where the soils do not have the support of tree roots.
Gullying and earthflow erosion can occur on all slopes, irrespective of steepness, but the land is only considered at risk if it does not have woody vegetation.
Landslide erosion is the shallow (approximately 1m) and sudden failure of soil slopes during storm rainfall. Gully erosion is massive soil erosion that begins at gully heads and expands up hillsides, over decadal time scales. Earthflow erosion is the slow downward movement (approximately 1m/year) of wet soil slopes towards waterways.

This data set relates to the "Estimated highly erodible land in the North Island" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 53177
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 100.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Distribution of possums 2002–2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7727
58
Added
12 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 12 Feb 2016.

"The pressure from animal and plant pests is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity in the land environment. Pest predators (such as stoats and possums) eat eggs, birds, lizards, insects, and snails. Other animal pests (such as deer and goats) damage and kill trees and other plants and can compete with indigenous animals for the plants’ fruit and seed. Pest plants can out-grow the local vegetation. All these activities can dramatically change both our indigenous and agricultural environments.

This data set relates to the "Land pests" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website."

Layer ID 53158
Data type Image/Raster
Resolution 100.000m
Services Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Lightning strike density, 2000–14

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

4336
29
Added
10 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 10 Feb 2016.

Lightning is the discharge of electricity, from thunderstorms, that equalises areas of positive and negative charge, for example, between a storm cloud and the ground. Thunderstorms form as a result of rapidly rising air with a high moisture content (humidity). On average, 1 in 10 lightning discharges strikes the ground (or sea) (Metservice, 2015). Lightning (and therefore thunderstorms) are also often associated with other severe weather events, such as strong wind gusts, and in extreme cases tornadoes.

By international standards, lightning does not occur frequently around New Zealand. However, thunderstorms, and thus lightning, can cause injury and damage (Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management, 2010), and may increase in frequency and intensity with climate change (Mullen et. al., 2011).

This data shows the average annual number of lightning strikes per 25km square.

This dataset relates to the "Lightning" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: grid/point

Unit: strikes/25km2/year

Further information can be found in:

MetService (nd). Lightning observation services. Accessed 3 June 2015 from www.metservice.com.

Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management (2010). Thunderstorms. Working from the same page: Consistent messages for CDEM (p3). Available from www.civildefence.govt.nz.

Mullan, B, Carey-Smith, T, Griffiths, G, & Sood, A (2011). Scenarios of storminess and regional wind extremes under climate change. NIWA Client Report: WLG2010-31 (pvii). Available from www.niwa.co.nz.

Layer ID 52851
Data type Grid
Resolution 5000.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average sea–surface temperature, 1993–2012

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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4912
52
Added
18 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Feb 2016.

The ocean waters surrounding New Zealand vary in temperature from north to south. They interact with heat and moisture in the atmosphere and affect our weather. Long-term changes and short-term variability in sea-surface temperatures can affect marine processes, habitats, and species. Some species may find it hard to survive in changing environmental conditions.

This grid shows average annual sea-surface temperature for years 1993 to 2013.

NIWA’s sea-surface temperature archive is derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data it receives from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The archive provides high spatial (approximately 1km) and high temporal (approximately 6-hourly in cloud-free locations) resolution estimates of sea-surface temperatures over the New Zealand region, dating from January 1993. Uddstrom and Oien (1999) and Uddstrom (2003) describe the methods used to derive and validate the data.

This dataset relates to the "Annual average sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Further information can be found in:

Uddstrom, MJ (2003). Lessons from high-resolution satellite SSTs. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 84(7), 896–897.

Uddstrom, MJ, & Oien, NA (1999). On the use of high resolution satellite data to describe the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface temperatures in the New Zealand region. Journal of Geophysical Research (Oceans) 104, chapter 9, 20729–20751.

Layer ID 53316
Data type Grid
Resolution 2000.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Soil moisture PED annual average 1972-2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5028
81
Added
18 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 18 Feb 2016.

Soil moisture is important for plant growth. A lack of moisture content over a growing season is a good indicator of drought, which can have social, environmental, and economic impacts. Increasing temperatures and changes in rainfall patterns are expected to increase the frequency and intensity of drought in many regions. Growing season soil moisture deficits are estimated by the potential evapotranspiration deficit, the difference between rainfall and evapotranspiration.

This dataset shows annual average soil moisture (potential evapotranspiration deficit (PED)) across New Zealand for years 1972 to 2014.

Evapotranspiration is the loss of water by evaporation and plant transpiration. PED is the difference between estimated evapotranspiration and rainfall.

We produced maps of the annual PED total (in millimetres) for every growing season (calculated as July–June years) from 1972 to 2013. Care should be taken when comparing maps from year to year – days may be missing from the PED GIS data, and data may have been interpolated to complete the dataset. The interpolation accuracy is lowest in areas of high elevation, where there are fewer climate stations and complex terrain affects accuracy. Climate stations may also open and close, affecting the accuracy of the data provided.

This dataset relates to the "Soil moisture and drought" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Geometry: raster catalogue
Unit: mm/yr

Layer ID 53315
Data type Grid
Resolution 5096.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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