Maximum latitudinal extent of selected key non-indigenous species

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3199
6
Added
23 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 23 Oct 2016.

Marine non-indigenous (exotic) species arrive in New Zealand waters on the hulls of international vessels (biofouling) or in discharged ballast waters. Some have little impact or cannot survive in New Zealand waters; others have a negative impact on our native habitats and species and become pests. They can compete with, and prey on, indigenous species, modify natural habitats, affect marine industries or can alter ecosystem processes. The potential impact of non-indigenous species on our native habitats and species means they could threaten our cultural and natural heritage, as well as economic activities such as commercial and recreational fishing, shellfish harvesting, and aquaculture.
The maximum latitudinal extent is the range between the northern-most and southern-most records of these species.

Table ID 53507
Data type Table
Row count 32
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of shorebird species and subspecies (2012)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3662
9
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand has 92 seabird and 14 shorebird species and subspecies (taxa). Seabirds and shorebirds tend to be at or near the top of the food chain, and thrive only if the marine ecosystem is healthy. Decreasing bird populations can signal that the ecosystem is degrading.
This dataset relates to the "Conservation status of seabirds and shorebirds" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52513
Data type Table
Row count 20
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average annual chlorophyll-a concentration anomalies 2014

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3235
7
Added
09 Feb 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 09 Feb 2016.

"The annual anomalies where primary productivity for 2014 deviated from the long-term mean (1997–2014).
Concentrations of chl-a in phytoplankton are used to assess primary productivity in our oceans. Phytoplankton are primary producers of biomass and form the basis of the oceans’ food chains."

Layer ID 52827
Data type Grid
Resolution 5000.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Soil health and land use - Change in soil sites within target range for given soil health indicators, 1995–2008 and 2009–13

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3029
15
Updated
20 Apr 2017

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 20 Apr 2017.

Updated 21/04/2017
(See "Land domain updates" page for details; www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/environment/env...)

Different land uses put pressure on the land environment and can result in changes to soil health. Healthy soil supports the productivity of agriculture and forestry, and filters water to help prevent waterways becoming contaminated. Soils are considered healthy if they fall within the target ranges for the indicators of acidity, fertility, organic reserves, and physical status.

This dataset relates to the "Soil health and land use" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

For raw data see "2015 land aotearoa soil health data for release.xlsx" attachment below.

Table ID 52484
Data type Table
Row count 8
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Cumulative overlap of TCEPR trawl footprint with BOMEC habitat classes (1990–2010)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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2885
11
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Seabed trawling is the practice of towing fishing nets near or along the ocean floor. The towing process can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed. This creates sediment plumes that change light conditions. This can affect marine species (for example by limiting their capacity to generate energy through photosynthesis) and smother sensitive species.
This dataset relates to the "Commercial seabed trawling and dredging" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52506
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Cumulative occupancy of key non-indigenous species by port of first entry (2009–2015)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3564
7
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Marine non-indigenous (exotic) species arrive in New Zealand waters on the hulls of international vessels (biofouling) or in discharged ballast waters. Some have little impact or cannot survive in New Zealand waters; others have a negative impact on our native habitats and species and become pests. They can compete with, and prey on, indigenous species, modify natural habitats, affect marine industries or can alter ecosystem processes. The potential impact of non-indigenous species on our native habitats and species means they could threaten our cultural and natural heritage, as well as economic activities such as commercial and recreational fishing, shellfish harvesting, and aquaculture.

Table ID 53493
Data type Table
Row count 77
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of extreme wave events exceeding 4m in oceanic regions, 2008–15

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5975
4
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Extreme wave indexes estimate the occurrence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters. Extreme wave indexes estimate the number of times a significant wave height exceeds one of three threshold values for at least 12 hours in 24 marine regions. The three wave-height thresholds are four metres, six metres, and eight metres.
This indicator estimates the exceedances of wave-height thresholds for each year from 2008 to 2015 in oceanic regions around New Zealand.
Significant wave height is a measure of the ‘typical’ wave height in a place over a time period. It is four times the standard deviation of the water surface if, for example, you were to measure water moving up and down a jetty piling for an hour. The largest individual wave will typically have a height around twice the significant wave height.
We use three wave-height thresholds because of the regional variation in extreme wave events. In general, the north experiences less exposure to consistently strong winds, and the waves generated by them, than the south. Four-metre tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts of New Zealand but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.
This dataset relates to the number of extreme wave events exceeding the four metre threshold in oceanic regions.

Layer ID 53503
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 48
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average number of days wind speed exceeded gale force (Beaufort Scale 8)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3588
10
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

The ocean storm index estimates the number of days in a year when wind speeds exceed gale and storm force on the Beaufort Scale. In a gale, sea conditions are rough and waves can be over six metres high. In a storm, waves can be over 10 metres high. To put this into context, on land a near gale would make walking difficult, and a storm would cause some damage to roofs, chimneys, and trees. Climate change could lead to changes in the frequency and intensity of storms. More frequent and intense storms will likely be a stressor for habitats and species.
The ocean storm index estimates the number of days that wind speeds exceed gale and storm force on the Beaufort Scale. The Beaufort Scale is a widely used international classification that rates sea conditions from 0 (calm) to 12 (hurricane). We report on estimated wind speeds broken down to:
- gales – measure 8 on the scale, have rough sea conditions with wind speeds of approximately 62–74 km per hour and wave heights of 5.5 metres
- storms – measure 10 on the scale, have wind speeds of approximately 89–102 km per hour and wave heights of 9–11.5 metres (McDonald & Parsons, 2016).
This data relates to the average number of days wind speed exceeded gale force (Beaufort Scale 8) from 1979–2015.

Layer ID 53461
Data type Grid
Resolution About 47632.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of extreme wave events exceeding 6m in coastal regions, 2008–15

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

5706
7
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Extreme wave indexes estimate the occurrence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters. Extreme wave indexes estimate the number of times a significant wave height exceeds one of three threshold values for at least 12 hours in 24 marine regions. The three wave-height thresholds are four metres, six metres, and eight metres.
This indicator estimates the exceedances of a wave-height threshold for each year from 2008 to 2015 in coastal regions.
Significant wave height is a measure of the ‘typical’ wave height in a place over a time period. It is four times the standard deviation of the water surface if, for example, you were to measure water moving up and down a jetty piling for an hour. The largest individual wave will typically have a height around twice the significant wave height.
We use three wave-height thresholds because of the regional variation in extreme wave events. In general, the north experiences less exposure to consistently strong winds, and the waves generated by them, than the south. Four-metre tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts of New Zealand but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.
This dataset relates to the number of extreme wave events exceeding the six metre threshold in coastal regions.

Layer ID 53501
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 144
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Landings from stocks meeting or exceeding performance thresholds (2009–14)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3229
14
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Our fish stocks are affected by commercial, customary, and recreational fishing, and environmental pressures (eg ocean temperature, acidity, and productivity). The Ministry for Primary Industries uses three performance measures to assess influences on fish stocks: a soft limit (below which a rebuilding plan is required), a hard limit (below which closing a fishery should be considered), and an overfishing threshold (where the rate of extraction is higher than the rate of replenishment).
This dataset relates to the "State of fish stocks" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52514
Data type Table
Row count 51
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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