Changes in the conservation status of indigenous marine species

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3084
14
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

Marine mammals, seabirds, and shorebirds are indicator species for the state of our marine environment. A decreasing population can indicate that the ecosystem is degrading. New Zealand has a diverse range of marine species, many of which are endemic to (only breed in) New Zealand. They are apex species (near the top of the food chain) and can thrive only if their ecosystems are healthy.
This measure reports on the number of indigenous marine species that have had a genuine change in conservation status between two monitoring periods (2008–11 and 2012–14). A change in a species’ conservation status reflects a change in its risk of extinction.

Table ID 53466
Data type Table
Row count 10
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal and oceanic extreme waves 2008 - 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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13
8
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

Extreme wave events can damage marine ecosystems and affect coastal infrastructure, ocean-based industries, and other human activities.

Changing wave characteristics can have impacts on natural systems, as most coastal and near-shore biological communities can be damaged or destroyed by extreme wave action (Ummenhofer & Mehl, 2017). In another example, extreme waves can disrupt ferries such as those crossing the Cook Strait. Sailings are often cancelled when significant wave heights exceed six metres.

It is important to report on extreme waves to gain greater insight into their frequency, particularly as sea level and storm surges are projected to increase and can compound wave effects.

In this dataset, an extreme wave event is defined as a continuous 12-hour period during which the significant wave height equals or exceeds one of three height thresholds: four, six, or eight metres.

Four-metre-tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104060
Data type Table
Row count 793
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal extreme waves (2008–15)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3115
12
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Extreme wave indexes estimate the occurrence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters. Extreme wave indexes estimate the number of times a significant wave height exceeds one of three threshold values for at least 12 hours in 24 marine regions. The three wave-height thresholds are four metres, six metres, and eight metres.
This indicator estimates the exceedances of wave-height thresholds for each year from 2008 to 2015 in coastal areas.
Significant wave height is a measure of the ‘typical’ wave height in a place over a time period. It is four times the standard deviation of the water surface if, for example, you were to measure water moving up and down a jetty piling for an hour. The largest individual wave will typically have a height around twice the significant wave height.
We use three wave-height thresholds because of the regional variation in extreme wave events. In general, the north experiences less exposure to consistently strong winds, and the waves generated by them, than the south. Four-metre tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts of New Zealand but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.

Table ID 53476
Data type Table
Row count 54
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal sea-level rise 1901 - 2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1114
19
Added
14 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2019.

This indicator measures the rise in annual mean coastal sea level relative to land. The national mean is derived from four long-term monitoring locations across New Zealand: Auckland, Wellington, Dunedin and Lyttelton. We also report the trends over time, from the beginning of our records until 2018. Relative sea-level rise includes the vertical land movement of the surrounding area (for example, a sinking landmass increases the rise in ocean sea level).

We report the change in annual mean coastal sea level to 2018 against the established baseline (mean sea level for 1986–2005) for the long-term sites plus an additional two sites: Moturiki (Mount Maunganui) and New Plymouth. These are not included in the national mean due to shorter records. We also measure the national annual sea-level rise for two time periods: the start of the records to 1960, and 1961–2018.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104055
Data type Table
Row count 524
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Commercial catch for sharks and rays

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3135
27
Added
24 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 24 Oct 2016.

New Zealand waters have at least 117 species of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, and other cartilaginous fish species). They are particularly vulnerable to overfishing because they are long-lived, mature slowly, and have a low reproductive rate. Chondrichthyans are important for healthy ocean ecosystems, and reporting their commercial catch and bycatch helps us understand the sustainability of our fisheries.

Table ID 53508
Data type Table
Row count 453
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of indigenous land species, 2010–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3569
28
Added
16 Apr 2018

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2018.

New Zealand has unique indigenous plants and animals that are our national taonga (treasures). Because most are endemic (found nowhere else in the world) New Zealand makes an important contribution to global biodiversity. Biodiversity is important for ecosystem processes, te ao Māori including mahinga kai (customary food gathering), and culture and recreation.

The conservation status of our biodiversity represents their risk of extinction. This data covers the conservation status, and most-recent change in status, of native and resident taxa for which we had sufficient information on abundance and distribution. This includes bats, birds, earthworms, lichens, plants, reptiles and frogs, snails, spiders, and insects.

We also include the number of species that have had a genuine change in conservation status between assessment periods.Where conservation status changed, this measure also looked at the NCTCS listings done in 2012 for birds (Robertson et al, 2017); 2012 for reptiles (Hitchmough et al, 2015); and 2010 for Orthoptera (Trewick et al, 2012). A change in a species’ conservation status reflects a change in its risk of extinction.

For more information on the Department of Conservation’s Threat Classification System (NZTCS) please refer to: www.doc.govt.nz/nztcs

Table ID 95341
Data type Table
Row count 8679
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of indigenous marine species

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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988
5
Added
14 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2019.

We report on the conservation status and most recent change in status of indigenous (native), resident (breeds in New Zealand) marine species that have been assessed by New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS) expert panels. This includes marine mammals (dolphins, whales, seals, and sea lions), seabirds and shorebirds, sharks, rays, and chimaeras (also known as ghost sharks), and a small fraction of marine invertebrates.

Conservation status is a representation of the threat classification of resident indigenous plant and animal species. The Department of Conservation (DOC) developed the New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS) to provide a national system that is similar to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources Red List.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104059
Data type Table
Row count 10942
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of marine mammals

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3151
24
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

New Zealand has a diverse range of marine mammal species and subspecies, including whales, dolphins, seals, and sea lions. Marine mammals are indicator species for the state of our marine environment. The conservation status of a species relates to its risk of extinction.
Many of these species are endemic (only found in) to New Zealand. They are apex species (near the top of the food chain) and can thrive only if their ecosystems are healthy. A decreasing population can indicate that the ecosystem is degrading. Marine mammals played an important part in New Zealand history; in the past whales and seals were hunted in great numbers. Now we have a rapidly-growing whale- and dolphin-watching industry.

Table ID 53481
Data type Table
Row count 29
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of native freshwater fish and invertebrates, 2013

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3884
48
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

New Zealand has a diverse range of freshwater species. Many of these species are endemic to (only occur in, or only breed in) New Zealand. Freshwater fish and invertebrates are indicator species for the state of our freshwater environment. A decreasing population can indicate that the ecosystem is degrading.

This measure reports on the conservation status of New Zealand's indigenous freshwater fish and invertebrate species, including the number of species that have had a genuine change in conservation status between two monitoring periods (2009–13 and 2005–13). A change in a species’ conservation status reflects a change in its risk of extinction.

Table ID 53612
Data type Table
Row count 723
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Cultural Health Index scores for waterways, 2005–16

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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3302
23
Added
25 Apr 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 25 Apr 2017.

Cultural Health Index scores for a waterway is a combination measure of historical cultural use and access, mahinga kai assessment, and water quality assessment from a cultural perspective of a site on a waterway.

The Cultural Health Index scores compile this information into a classification system to provide an overall grading of the state of a site and how the state of a site on a waterway affects the mauri, the ability for tangata whenua to feed the hapu and iwi and the overall water quality for the site. These are all important indicators of the cultural health of a waterway, and are also a consideration for other cultural and recreational activities like karakia, cleansing, swimming and wading.

Table ID 53617
Data type Table
Row count 42
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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