Number of extreme wave events exceeding 8m in coastal regions, 2008–15

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

9979
32
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Extreme wave indexes estimate the occurrence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters. Extreme wave indexes estimate the number of times a significant wave height exceeds one of three threshold values for at least 12 hours in 24 marine regions. The three wave-height thresholds are four metres, six metres, and eight metres.
This indicator estimates the exceedances of a wave-height threshold for each year from 2008 to 2015 in coastal regions.
Significant wave height is a measure of the ‘typical’ wave height in a place over a time period. It is four times the standard deviation of the water surface if, for example, you were to measure water moving up and down a jetty piling for an hour. The largest individual wave will typically have a height around twice the significant wave height.
We use three wave-height thresholds because of the regional variation in extreme wave events. In general, the north experiences less exposure to consistently strong winds, and the waves generated by them, than the south. Four-metre tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts of New Zealand but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.
This dataset relates to the number of extreme wave events exceeding the eight metre threshold in coastal regions.

Layer ID 53502
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 144
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of extreme wave events exceeding 6m in coastal regions, 2008–15

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

8677
12
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Extreme wave indexes estimate the occurrence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters. Extreme wave indexes estimate the number of times a significant wave height exceeds one of three threshold values for at least 12 hours in 24 marine regions. The three wave-height thresholds are four metres, six metres, and eight metres.
This indicator estimates the exceedances of a wave-height threshold for each year from 2008 to 2015 in coastal regions.
Significant wave height is a measure of the ‘typical’ wave height in a place over a time period. It is four times the standard deviation of the water surface if, for example, you were to measure water moving up and down a jetty piling for an hour. The largest individual wave will typically have a height around twice the significant wave height.
We use three wave-height thresholds because of the regional variation in extreme wave events. In general, the north experiences less exposure to consistently strong winds, and the waves generated by them, than the south. Four-metre tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts of New Zealand but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.
This dataset relates to the number of extreme wave events exceeding the six metre threshold in coastal regions.

Layer ID 53501
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 144
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Number of extreme wave events exceeding 4m in coastal regions, 2008–15

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

You may use this work for commercial purposes.

You must attribute the creator in your own works.

8696
19
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Extreme wave indexes estimate the occurrence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters. Extreme wave indexes estimate the number of times a significant wave height exceeds one of three threshold values for at least 12 hours in 24 marine regions. The three wave-height thresholds are four metres, six metres, and eight metres.
This indicator estimates the exceedances of a wave-height threshold for each year from 2008 to 2015 in coastal regions.
Significant wave height is a measure of the ‘typical’ wave height in a place over a time period. It is four times the standard deviation of the water surface if, for example, you were to measure water moving up and down a jetty piling for an hour. The largest individual wave will typically have a height around twice the significant wave height.
We use three wave-height thresholds because of the regional variation in extreme wave events. In general, the north experiences less exposure to consistently strong winds, and the waves generated by them, than the south. Four-metre tall waves are considered extreme in the northern-most parts of New Zealand but are more common in the south. For the southern-most parts of New Zealand, eight-metre waves better represent extreme wave events.
This dataset relates to the number of extreme wave events exceeding the four metre threshold in coastal regions.

Layer ID 53500
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 144
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Mineral Coal Open newly available acreage

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

8495
11
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

The location and extent of Newly Available Acreage (NAA) in the territorial sea and the exclusive economic zone

Layer ID 52752
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 8
Services Vector Query API, Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal and estuarine water quality state 1973–2018

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4769
25
Added
16 Apr 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Apr 2019.

Data are for 15 measures of coastal water  quality at monitored sites in New Zealand. These 15 measures are dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, temperature, visual clarity, turbidity, suspended solids, ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrate-nitrite nitrogen, total nitrogen, dissolved reactive phosphorus, total phosphorus, faecal coliforms, enterococci, and chlorophyll-a.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Summary report available at www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporti....

Table ID 99882
Data type Table
Row count 2058
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Area of seabed trawled by BOMEC habitat classes (1990–2011)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6818
11
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

Seabed trawling and dredging (where fishing gear is towed near or along the ocean floor) can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. These fishing methods can also stir up sediment from the seabed, creating sediment plumes that can smother sensitive species. Recovery times for affected habitats and species depend on their sensitivity and the area affected by trawling or dredging. Bottom trawling is carried out on or near the seabed in both shallow and deep waters. Dredging is carried out on the seabed in shallow waters and targets marine creatures such as scallops. This measure focuses on deepwater areas (waters deeper than 200m).

Table ID 53488
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Average number of days wind speed exceeded gale force (Beaufort Scale 8)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6222
23
Added
14 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2016.

The ocean storm index estimates the number of days in a year when wind speeds exceed gale and storm force on the Beaufort Scale. In a gale, sea conditions are rough and waves can be over six metres high. In a storm, waves can be over 10 metres high. To put this into context, on land a near gale would make walking difficult, and a storm would cause some damage to roofs, chimneys, and trees. Climate change could lead to changes in the frequency and intensity of storms. More frequent and intense storms will likely be a stressor for habitats and species.
The ocean storm index estimates the number of days that wind speeds exceed gale and storm force on the Beaufort Scale. The Beaufort Scale is a widely used international classification that rates sea conditions from 0 (calm) to 12 (hurricane). We report on estimated wind speeds broken down to:
- gales – measure 8 on the scale, have rough sea conditions with wind speeds of approximately 62–74 km per hour and wave heights of 5.5 metres
- storms – measure 10 on the scale, have wind speeds of approximately 89–102 km per hour and wave heights of 9–11.5 metres (McDonald & Parsons, 2016).
This data relates to the average number of days wind speed exceeded gale force (Beaufort Scale 8) from 1979–2015.

Layer ID 53461
Data type Grid
Resolution About 47632.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ocean and coastal extreme waves (8m), 2010

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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3462
6
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

These data estimate the occurence of extreme wave events in coastal and oceanic waters for 2010, particularly for wave events where significant wave height exceeds a threshold of 8 metres and for a period of at least 12 hours. Significant wave height is defined as four times the square root of the variance of sea surface elevation due to wave motion.

This index was generated using NIWA’s operational wave forecasting model NZWAVE-12.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Layer ID 104081
Data type Grid
Resolution About 13356.000m
Services Raster Query API, Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Cumulative overlap of coastal trawl footprint by BOMEC class (2008–12)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

6612
12
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Seabed trawling, when fishing nets are towed near and along the ocean floor, can physically damage seabed (benthic) habitats and species. It can also stir up sediment from the seabed, shading or smothering marine species. For this measure, coastal areas are waters shallower than 250m.
This dataset relates to the "Commercial coastal seabed trawling" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52507
Data type Table
Row count 22
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of marine mammals

Licence

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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You must attribute the creator in your own works.

7034
29
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

New Zealand has a diverse range of marine mammal species. Marine mammals are indicator species for the state of our marine environment. They are apex species (near the top of the food chain) and can thrive only if their ecosystems are healthy. A decreasing population can indicate that the ecosystem is degrading.
This dataset relates to the "Conservation status of marine mammals" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52510
Data type Table
Row count 30
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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