DoC marine mammal sanctuaries (2016 report)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8538
40
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

New Zealand’s four million km2 marine environment is diverse, with a range of coastal habitats and offshore seabed environments. There are also many marine species unique to New Zealand. Marine protected areas conserve or manage some of these unique habitats and species, while a range of other tools also provide marine protection. We report on the area covered by these tools as an indirect measure to understand the state of the marine environment.
Marine mammal sanctuaries are one of the marine protection tools used. They are designed to protect New Zealand’s unique range of marine mammals by reducing harmful human impacts, particularly in vulnerable areas such as migratory routes and breeding grounds. Each marine mammal sanctuary has a specific set of restrictions based on the species that occupy, or pass through that particular area.

Layer ID 53495
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 9
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Ocean acidification, 1998–2016

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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8258
76
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

The pH of New Zealand subantarctic waters is calculated from pCO2 (dissolved carbon dioxide) and alkalinity measurements using refitted Mehrbach constants (see Mehrbach et al, 1973; Dickson & Millero, 1987), and in-situ temperature taken from the Munida time-series transect off the Otago coast. Measurements of pCO2 are taken every two months.
The Munida transect, in the subantarctic waters off Otago, is the Southern Hemisphere’s longest-running record of pH measurements (NIWA, 2015).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our Environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89461
Data type Table
Row count 660
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Coastal sea level rise, 1891–2015

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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7679
127
Added
14 Oct 2017

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 14 Oct 2017.

Sea-level rise is a consequence of climate change. Increased global temperatures lead to rising sea-levels because warmer waters take up more space and glaciers and polar ice sheets melt into the ocean. Sea-level varies naturally from place to place due to local ocean circulation and temperatures and the movement of the land relative to the sea. For example, earthquakes can lift or drop the land.
Linear trends were provided by NIWA and Emeritus Professor John Hannah (previously University of Otago). Ideally, linear trends in sea level would be reported if there are at least 50 years of data to account for climate variability from climate oscillations such as the 20–30 year Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) and the shorter ENSO cycle. Such climate variability can be seen in the increase in annual mean sea level in 1999–2000, when the IPO across the entire Pacific Ocean changed to a negative phase. While the Moturiki data cover 43 years, it was considered appropriate to apply a linear trend to further extend the number of reported sites. Further detail on the data processing (including adjustments for historic datum changes) and methods used for the trend analysis can be found in Hannah (1990), Hannah (2004), and Hannah and Bell (2012).
More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 89454
Data type Table
Row count 533
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

BOMEC_15_Class_region

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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18622
62
Updated
03 Jul 2018

This dataset was last updated on MfE Data Service on 03 Jul 2018.

The 15 class Benthic-Optimised Marine Environment Classification (BOMEC). The BOMEC divides the benthic environment into ecosystem types. These are grouped into three inshore groups, three continental shelf groups, and nine deeper-water groups. Each group represents areas with similar environmental variables, such as depth, temperature, salinity, and suspended sediment. The classification system considers the distributions of eight benthic taxonomic groups: asteroids, bryozoans, benthic foraminiferans, octocorals, polychaetes, matrix-forming scleratinian corals, sponges, and benthic fish.

Layer ID 52748
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 15
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Mean, maximum and minimum coastal sea surface temperature (1953–2014)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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7880
112
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Coastal sea-surface temperature is influenced by solar heating and cooling, latitude, and local geography. It is hard for some marine species to survive when the sea temperature changes. This can affect marine ecosystems and processes. It can also affect fish-farming industries based in our coastal areas.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal sea-surface temperature" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52524
Data type Table
Row count 33
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Conservation status of marine mammals

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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6116
42
Added
19 Oct 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 19 Oct 2016.

New Zealand has a diverse range of marine mammal species and subspecies, including whales, dolphins, seals, and sea lions. Marine mammals are indicator species for the state of our marine environment. The conservation status of a species relates to its risk of extinction.
Many of these species are endemic (only found in) to New Zealand. They are apex species (near the top of the food chain) and can thrive only if their ecosystems are healthy. A decreasing population can indicate that the ecosystem is degrading. Marine mammals played an important part in New Zealand history; in the past whales and seals were hunted in great numbers. Now we have a rapidly-growing whale- and dolphin-watching industry.

Table ID 53481
Data type Table
Row count 29
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine litter 2018-2019

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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4099
72
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

These data provide a snap shot of beach litter surveys submitted by Citizen Scientist ‘Monitoring Groups’ up to April, 2019. As defined by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP, 2009), marine litter is any persistent, manufactured or processed solid material discarded, disposed of, abandoned or lost in the marine and coastal environment. Marine litter washed onto beaches is one of the most obvious signs of marine pollution, and can have either land or sea-based origins. Land-based sources of marine litter include input from rivers, sewage and storm water outflows, tourism and recreation, illegal dumping, and waste disposal sites. Sea-based sources include commercial shipping, fisheries and aquaculture activities, recreational boating and offshore installations.

UNEP, 2009. Marine Litter: A Global Challenge. Nairobi: UNEP. 232 pp.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104071
Data type Table
Row count 984
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Marine Reserves

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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10332
230
Added
11 Jan 2016

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 11 Jan 2016.

The location and extent of Marine reserves (type 1 marine protected areas) in the territorial sea.

Layer ID 52760
Data type Vector multipolygon
Feature count 44
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Annual mean sea level (relative to land) (1900–2013)

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand

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8209
185
Added
28 Sep 2015

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 28 Sep 2015.

Sea-level rise is a consequence of climate change. Increases in global temperature cause ocean waters to expand, and glaciers and ice sheets to melt into oceans. Sea-level rise affects estuaries, coastal wetlands, and intertidal and sub-tidal habitats and species. The increased likelihood of coastal erosion from sea-level rise presents a risk for seaside communities and their infrastructure, and for the marine environment itself, from increased suspended sediments.
This dataset relates to the "Coastal sea-level rise" measure on the Environmental Indicators, Te taiao Aotearoa website.

Table ID 52523
Data type Table
Row count 575
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed

Ocean acidification state 1998 - 2017

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

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1400
10
Added
16 Oct 2019

This dataset was first added to MfE Data Service on 16 Oct 2019.

Ocean acidification is the long-term decrease in the pH of our coastal waters and oceans. This indicator measures the change in pH in subantarctic surface waters at a station east of Otago from 1998 to 2017, and also the pH at selected coastal sites via the New Zealand Ocean Acidification Observing Network (NZOA-ON) from 2015 to 2017.

More information on this dataset and how it relates to our environmental reporting indicators and topics can be found in the attached data quality pdf.

Table ID 104052
Data type Table
Row count 6526
Services Web Feature Service (WFS), Catalog Service (CS-W), data.govt.nz Atom Feed
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